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Lieutenant General Sir Arthur Thomas Sloggett, KCB, KCMG, KCVO (24 November 1857 – 27 November 1929) was a doctor and British Army officer. He served as Director General Army Medical Services in 1914 and Director-General of the Medical Services of the British Armies in the Field during First World War.[1][2]

Sir Arthur Sloggett
Sir Arthur Thomas Sloggett 1917.jpg
Sir Arthur Sloggett in 1917
Born3 October 1845
Died29 December 1937
Allegiance United Kingdom
Service/branch British Army
RankLieutenant General
UnitRoyal Army Medical Corps
Commands heldDirector General Army Medical Services
Battles/warsMahdist War
Second Boer War
First World War
AwardsKnight Commander of the Order of the Bath
Knight Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George
Knight Commander of the Royal Victorian Order
Knight of Grace of the Order of St John of Jerusulem
Mentioned in Despatches
Order of the Medjidie (Ottoman)
Legion of Honour (France)
Order of Leopold (Belgium)

BiographyEdit

He was the son of the late Inspector-General W. H. Sloggett, R.N., and of his wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Cornish-Crossing J.P., of Stoke Damerel, Devon. Sloggett was educated at King's College London. Entering into the army as surgeon on 5 February 1881, he was soon promoted to Surgeon Captain and then Surgeon Major on 5 February 1893. In the Dongola Campaign of 1896, he served as senior medical officer of British Troops, was mentioned in dispatches in November 1896, and was specially promoted to surgeon Lieutenant-Colonel on 18 November 1896. During the Mahdist War, he served as Senior Medical Officer of the 1st Brigade, British Division, and took part in the battle of Khartum. He was dangerously wounded, when his horse was shot from under him, and he himself was shot through the chest by a bullet. For his services in the Nile Expedition he was mentioned in despatched in September 1898, and was specially promoted to the higher rate of pay of Lieutenant-Colonel on 16 October 1898. He also received the Egyptian medal with a clasp; a third class of the Order of the Medjidie; and the fourth class of the Osmanieh. He was appointed a Knight of Grace of the Order of St John of Jerusulem on 7 March 1900.[3]

Sloggett then served in the Second Boer War from 1899 to 1902, first in charge of the Imperial Yeomanry hospital, afterwards as principal medical officer of a general hospital, and then as commandant of Declfontein district and as Deputy Administrator for Cape Colony. He took part in operations in the Transvaal, the Orange River Colony, and Cape Colony. He was mentioned in dispatches in 1901, and received the Queen’s medal with three clasps, the King’s medal with two clasps, and was invested as a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George on 9 September 1903.

He was promoted to Surgeon-General on 13 May 1908, and then between 24 July 1908 and 30 December 1911 was Principal Medical Officer, 6th (Poona) Division in Bombay, India. In 1910 he was invested as a Companion of the Order of the Bath on 31 December 1911. He was appointed Principal Medical Officer at headquarters in India and Director of Medical Services in India. Sloggett also became an Honorary Surgeon to the King. On 1 June 1914, he was appointed Director General of the Army Medical Services, with the rank of Lieutenant-General.

Two months after his appointment as Director-General, the First World War started. He was sent to France on 28 October 1914, taking up the roll of Director-General of Medical Services of the British Expeditionary Force and Chief Commissioner of the British Red Cross Society and St John Ambulance Association. The responsibility of dealing with and organising the whole of the medical services at home and abroad became too much for him and caused him to become ill. It was decided, therefore, that Sloggett should remain the Director-General on active service abroad and Sir Alfred Keogh rejoined the services from retirement to become Director-General on the duties at home. Sloggett remained in France for nearly four years, until June 1918, when his four years’ term of office as Director-General came to an end. For his service during the war he was mentioned in dispatches seven times. He was made a Knight of the Order of the Bath and awarded the Legion of Honour in 1915, the Order of King Leopold of Belgium, Commander (3rd class) in 1916, and was invested as a Knight Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George and a Knight Commander of the Royal Victorian Order in 1917. In 1917, he was also elected a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England.

Sir Arthur Thomas Sloggett died suddenly while walking with his son near Regent's Park.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "No. 28836". The London Gazette. 2 June 1914. p. 4382.
  2. ^ "Sloggett, Sir Arthur Thomas (1857–1929)". Plarr's Lives of the Fellows Online. Royal College of Surgeons of England. Retrieved 7 February 2014.
  3. ^ "No. 27172". The London Gazette. 9 March 1900. p. 1628.
Military offices
Preceded by
Sir William Gubbins
Director General Army Medical Services
1914
Succeeded by
Sir Alfred Keogh