Open main menu

Wikipedia β

Arrington Dixon

Arrington Dixon is an American politician who is a former city council member and chairman of Washington, D.C.

Arrington Dixon
Born Arrington Dixon
Washington, D.C.
Alma mater Howard University, George Washington Law School[1]
Occupation Politician
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Sharon Pratt Kelly (1966–82)
(divorced)
Children Aimee Arrington Dixon (b. November 27, 1968) and Drew Arrington Dixon (b. November 8, 1970)

Contents

Early yearsEdit

Dixon was born in Anacostia in Washington, D.C., to James and Sally Dixon.[2]

Council of the District of ColumbiaEdit

1975–1979Edit

In November 1974, Dixon was chosen to represent Ward 4 when voters elected the first members of the Council of the District of Columbia, the legislature of the city's new home rule government.[3] The initial term for the Ward 4 seat, like those for half the council seats, was only 2 years, to provide for staggered council elections in later years,[4] but in 1976 Dixon was reelected to a full four-year term.[3]

1979–1983Edit

In 1978, council chairman Sterling Tucker ran for mayor rather than seeking reelection.[5] Dixon, who was halfway through his Ward 4 term, decided to run for council chairman and won. He served 4 years. In 1982, Dixon ran for reelection, but he was defeated in the Democratic primary by David A. Clarke.[5]

Dixon was later appointed by Mayor Marion Barry to serve as a public member of the National Capital Planning Commission.

1997Edit

More than a decade later, Dixon returned to the council as an at-large member for a few months in 1997 when he was chosen in August by the District of Columbia Democratic State Committee to replace Linda Cropp, who had vacated her at-large seat to become chairman.[6] The appointment lasted only until a December special election, in which he was defeated by then-Republican David Catania.[7] Catania was sworn in on December 15, 1997.[8]

Personal lifeEdit

In 1966, he married Sharon Pratt Kelly, and they had daughters Aimee and Drew. His daughters were born in 1968 and 1970.[9][10] The couple divorced in 1982 after sixteen years of marriage.[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Trescott, Jacqueline. "Arrington Dixon: Seeking Systems To Run the System". The Washington Post. May 18, 1975. p. M1.
  2. ^ Trescott, Jacqueline. "Arrington Dixon: Seeking Systems To Run the System". The Washington Post. May 18, 1975. p. M1.
  3. ^ a b District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. "Historical Elected Officials: Ward 4 Member of the Council of the District of Columbia". Archived from the original on 2008-07-16. Retrieved 2008-07-20. 
  4. ^ District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. "Historical Elected Officials: Length of Initial Terms Following First Home Rule Election". Archived from the original on 2008-07-16. Retrieved 2008-07-21. 
  5. ^ a b District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. "Historical Elected Officials: Chairman of the Council of the District of Columbia". Archived from the original on 2008-07-16. Retrieved 2008-07-20. 
  6. ^ "Arrington Dixon to Fill Vacancy Left by Cropp on D.C. Council". The Washington Post. 1997-08-16. p. D06. Retrieved 2008-07-22. 
  7. ^ Williams, Vanessa (1997-12-03). "Republican Wins Seat on D.C. Council; Catania Upsets Dixon Amid Low Turnout". The Washington Post. p. C01. Retrieved 2008-07-22. 
  8. ^ Williams, Vanessa (December 16, 1997). "New D.C. Council Member Knows Loss and Victory". The Washington Post. p. C1. 
  9. ^ a b "Sharon Pratt Dixon." Notable Black American Women, Book 1. Gale Research, 1992. Updated: 12/20/1992 Reproduced in Biography Resource Center. Farmington Hills, Michigan: Gale, 2009. http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/BioRC, Document Number: K1623000108. Fee, via Fairfax County Public Library 2009-04-10.
  10. ^ Randolph, Laura B. (Feb 1992). "Her marriage … her mission and … her mid-life transformation - Sharon Pratt Kelley". Ebony magazine. Johnson Publishing Company. Retrieved 2009-04-09. 

External linksEdit

Council of the District of Columbia
First Ward 4 Member, Council of the District of Columbia
1975 – 1979
Succeeded by
Charlene Drew Jarvis
Preceded by
Sterling Tucker
Chairman, Council of the District of Columbia
1979 – 1983
Succeeded by
David A. Clarke
Preceded by
Linda W. Cropp
At-Large Member, Council of the District of Columbia
1997
Succeeded by
David Catania