Archduchess Maria Magdalena of Austria (1689–1743)

Maria Magdalena, Archduchess of Austria (Maria Magdalena Josefa; 26 March 1689 – 1 May 1743) was a daughter of Emperor Leopold I and his third wife Eleonore Magdalene of the Palatinate. She died unmarried.

Archduchess Maria Magdalena
Archduchess Maria Magdalena of Austria 1689 1743.jpg
Born26 March 1689
Hofburg Palace, Vienna, Austrian Empire
Died1 May 1743(1743-05-01) (aged 54)
Hofburg Palace, Vienna, Austrian Empire
Burial
HouseHabsburg
FatherLeopold I, Holy Roman Emperor
MotherEleonore Magdalene of the Palatinate

BiographyEdit

Born at the Hofburg Palace in Vienna she was the ninth child of Emperor Leopold I and Eleonore Magdalene of the Palatinate. Shortly before the War of the Spanish Succession, there was the question of the new king of Spain, Philip V, marrying the archduchess, but Louis XIV was opposed to this match for political reasons, and the official reason given was that none of the archduchesses offered pleased his grandson. In 1708, her older sister Archduchess Maria Anna married John V of Portugal; plans for a second union between Austria and Portugal were discussed when Maria Magdalena was proposed as a bride for Infante Francis, Duke of Beja, brother of John V. Negotiations failed in the early stages and, as such, both candidates died unmarried. Again after the war the question of her becoming queen of Spain to replace the now deceased Luisa Maria of Savoy was floated. However, again it came to naught and Philip married Elisabeth Farnese instead.

After the failed marriage, she lived a life of seclusion and remained unmarried and died without issue. She had a close relationship to her niece Maria Theresa, the daughter of her brother Emperor Charles VI and future Empress and also with her sister Archduchess Maria Anna. She died of pneumonia at the age of 54. She was buried at the Imperial Crypts in Vienna.

AncestorsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Genealogie ascendante jusqu'au quatrieme degre inclusivement de tous les Rois et Princes de maisons souveraines de l'Europe actuellement vivans [Genealogy up to the fourth degree inclusive of all the Kings and Princes of sovereign houses of Europe currently living] (in French). Bourdeaux: Frederic Guillaume Birnstiel. 1768. p. 100.
  2. ^ a b Eder, Karl (1961), "Ferdinand III.", Neue Deutsche Biographie (NDB) (in German), 5, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 85–86; (full text online)
  3. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Maria Anna von Spanien" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 23 – via Wikisource.
  4. ^ a b Fuchs, Peter (2001), "Philipp Wilhelm", Neue Deutsche Biographie (NDB) (in German), 20, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, p. 384; (full text online)
  5. ^ a b Louda, Jirí; MacLagan, Michael (1999). Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (2nd ed.). London: Little, Brown and Company. table 84.
  6. ^ a b Eder, Karl (1961), "Ferdinand II.", Neue Deutsche Biographie (NDB) (in German), 5, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 83–85; (full text online)
  7. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Maria Anna von Bayern" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 23 – via Wikisource.
  8. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Philipp III." . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 120 – via Wikisource.
  9. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Margaretha (Königin von Spanien)" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 13 – via Wikisource.
  10. ^ a b Breitenbach, Josef (1898), "Wolfgang Wilhelm", Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB) (in German), 44, Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 87–116
  11. ^ a b Wolf, Joseph Heinrich (1844). Das Haus Wittelsbach. Bayern's Geschichte (in German). p. 281.
  12. ^ a b Becker, Wilhelm Martin (1964), "Georg II.", Neue Deutsche Biographie (NDB) (in German), 6, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, p. 217; (full text online)
  13. ^ a b Flathe, Heinrich Theodor (1881), "Johann Georg I. (Kurfürst von Sachsen)", Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB) (in German), 14, Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 376–381