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Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Florence

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The Archdiocese of Florence (Latin: Archidioecesis Florentina) is a metropolitan see of the Catholic Church in Italy.[1][2] It was traditionally founded in the 1st century, according to the 14th century chronicler Giovanni Villani.[3] The diocese was directly subordinate to the Holy See (Papacy) until 1420.[4]

Archdiocese of Florence

Archidioecesis Florentinus
Firenze.Duomo01.JPG
West front of Florence Cathedral
Location
CountryItaly
Ecclesiastical provinceFlorence
Statistics
Area2,205 km2 (851 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2016)
833,624
824,000 (guess) (98.8%)
Parishes305
Information
RiteRoman
Established1st Century
CathedralBasilica Cattedrale di S. Maria del Fiore
Secular priests367 (diocesan)
216 (Religious Orders)
67 Permanent Deacons
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
Metropolitan ArchbishopGiuseppe Betori
Bishops emeritusEnnio Antonelli
Map
Italy Tuscany Diocese map Firenze.svg
Website
www.diocesifirenze.it

Florence was elevated to the dignity of an archdiocese on May 10, 1419, by Pope Martin V.[5] The ecclesiastical province of Florence includes the dioceses of Arezzo-Cortona-Sansepolcro, Fiesole, Pistoia, Prato, and San Miniato.

The seat of the Archbishop of Florence is Florence Cathedral, otherwise the Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore. Since September 2008 Cardinal Giuseppe Betori has been the Archbishop.

Contents

HistoryEdit

On 29 July 1322, Pope John XXII reserved to the pope the right to nominate as well as confirm the bishops of Florence.[6]

Due to heavy rains in the autumn and winter of 1346–1347, the crops were a failure, in wheat as well as in grapes and olives. By May 1347 the price of wheat in Florence had doubled. Arrangements were made to import grain from south Italy, Sicily and Africa, but the merchants of Siena and Genoa, who were contracted to transport the foodstuffs, kept half for their own cities. 94,000 inhabitants of Florence were dependent upon municipal charity, and some 4,000 were said to have died of starvation.[7]

Then, in April 1348, the pestilence known as the Black Death, struck Florence. By July nearly 100,000 people were dead. The historian Giovanni Villani estimated that nearly three out of every five persons in Florence and its neighborhood had been struck down. Ultimately he himself succumbed.[8] In his famous introduction to the Decameron, Giovanni Boccaccio repeats the number 100,000 and provides harrowing details of the breakdown of social connections and human feelings.[9]

Other episodes of pestilence in Florence occurred in 1325, 1340, 1344, 1363, 1509, 1522–1528, and 1630.[10]

Council of FlorenceEdit

In 1438, the Council of Basel was moved to Ferrara, and, in doing so, split into two factions, one remaining at Basel and electing their own pope, the Antipope Felix V. The faction that settled at Ferrara had to leave soon, however, due to an appearance of the plague. They were reconstituted at Florence by Pope Eugenius IV, and became the Council of Florence, which was transferred to Rome in 1443.[11]

Chapter and cathedralEdit

The current cathedral of Florence is dedicated to the Assumption of the Body of the Virgin Mary into Heaven. The cathedral was originally dedicated to S. John the Baptist, and occupied the former temple of Mars. When it became too small for the clergy and necessary rituals, a new cathedral, dedicated to S. Reparata, was built.[12]

The cathedral was administered by a Chapter, composed of five dignities and thirty-seven Canons. The dignities were: the Provost, the Archdeacon, the Archpriest, and the Dean.[13]

The diocese also had twelve collegiate churches, the most important of which is San Lorenzo.[14]

Diocesan synodsEdit

A diocesan synod was an irregularly held, but important, meeting of the bishop of a diocese and his clergy. Its purpose was (1) to proclaim generally the various decrees already issued by the bishop; (2) to discuss and ratify measures on which the bishop chose to consult with his clergy; (3) to publish statutes and decrees of the diocesan synod, of the provincial synod, and of the Holy See.[15]

  • 1073 - Raynerius.[16]
  • 1139 - Gottifredo degli Alberti.[17]
  • 1310, 13 August - Antonio D'Orso.
  • 1327, 1 August - Francesco di Silvestro.[18]
  • 1343 - Angelo Acciaiuoli seniore.
  • 1346 Angelo Acciaiuoli[19]
  • 1350, March - Angelo Acciaioli seniore.
  • 1372, 13-14 January -Angelo Ricasoli.
  • 1393, 3 July - Onofrio Visdomini.
  • 1415 - Amerigo Corsini.
  • 1446, 22 April - Antonino Pierozzi.
  • 1508 - Cosimo Pazzi.
  • 1517 - Cardinal Giulio de' Medici
  • 1565, 29 March - Antonio Altoviti.
  • 1569, 5 May - Antonio Altoviti.[20]
  • 1573, 9 April - Antonio Altoviti (provincial synod)
  • 1589, 26 March-11 June - Cardinal Alessandro de' Medici.[21]
  • 1603, 17 June - Cardinal Alessandro de' Medici.[22]
  • 1610, 27 May - Alessandro Marzi Medici.
  • 1614, 4 June - Alessandro Marzi Medici.
  • 1619, 14-15 May - Alessandro Marzi Medici.[23]
  • 1623, 17 May - Alessandro Marzi Medici.[24]
  • 1627, 18 May - Alessandro Marzi Medici.[25]
  • 1629, 10 May - Alessandro Marzi Medici.[26]
  • 1637, 16 June - Pietro Niccolini.[27]
  • 1645, 17 May - Pietro Niccolini.[28]
  • 1656, 4 April - Cardinal Francesco Nerli seniore.[29]
  • 1663, 26 September - Cardinal Francesco Nerli seniore.[30]
  • 1666, 23 September - Cardinal Francesco Nerli seniore.[31]
  • 1669, 25 September - Cardinal Francesco Nerli seniore.[32]
  • 1674, 12 September - Cardinal Francesco Nerli iuniore.[33]
  • 1678, 31 August - Cardinal Francesco Nerli iuniore.[34]
  • 1681, 27 August - Cardinal Francesco Nerli iuniore.[35]
  • 1691, 26 September - Jacopo Antonio Morigia.[36]
  • 1699, 24 September - Jacopo Antonio Morigia[37]
  • 1710, 10 September - Tommaso Bonaventura Della Gherardesca.[38]
  • 1732, 24 September - Giuseppe Maria Martelli.[39]
  • 1905, 21-23 November - Alfonso Maria Mistrangelo.
  • 1936, 10-12 September - Cardinal Elia Dalla Costa.
  • 1946, 8-9 May - Cardinal Elia Dalla Costa.
  • 1988 - Cardinal Silvano Piovanelli.
  • 1992 - Cardinal Silvano Piovanelli.[40]

Bishops of FlorenceEdit

to 1200Edit

  • Felix (attested 313)[41]
...
...
Mauritius ( –550)[43]
...
  • Reparatus (attested 679, 684)[44]
...
  • Speciosus (attested 716, 724)[45]
...
  • Thomas (attested 743)[46]
...
  • Aliprandus (attested 826, 833)[47]
...
  • Rodingus (attested 852)[48]
  • Gerardus (attested 853, 855)[49]
  • Petrus (attested 861)[50]
  • Andreas (attested 873, 876, 890)[51]
...
  • Grasulphus (attested 897, 898, 904)[52]
...
  • Podo (Podio) (attested 908–926)[53]
...
  • Raimbaldus (attested 941, 964)[54]
  • Sichelmus (attested 966, 972)[55]
...
  • Podio (Podius) (attested 987–999)[56]
  • Guido (attested 1004–1007)[57]
  • Ildebrandus (Hildebrand) (attested 1008–1024)[58]
  • Lambertus (attested 1025, 1028, 1032)[59]
  • Atto (attested 1036, 1037)[60]
  • Gérard de Bourgogne (1045–1058) [61]
  • Petrus Mezzabarba (attested 1065–1068)[62]
Sede vacante (1068–1071)[63]
Rodulfus, Bishop of Todi, Apostolic Administrator[64]
  • Rainerius (attested 1071–1113)[65]
  • Gotefridus (c.1114–c.1146)[66]
  • Actius (Atto) (1143–1154)[67]
  • Ambrosius (1155–1158)[68]
  • Julius (attested 1158–1182)[69]
  • Bernardus (1182-1187)[70]
  • Paganus (1087–1090)[71]
  • Petrus (1190–1205)[72]

1200 to 1411Edit

  • Joannes de Velletri (1205–1230)
  • Ardingus Trotti (1231–1247)[73]
  • Philippus Fontana (1250–1251)
  • Joannes de Mangiadori (1251–after 1275)[74]
  • Jacobus (Castelbuono), O.P. (1286)[75]
  • Andreas de Mozzi (1286–1295)[76]
  • Franciscus de Monaldeschi (1295–1302)[77]
  • Loterius della Tosa (1303–1309)
  • Antonius Orso (1310–1321)
  • Franciscus Silvestri (1323–1341)[78]
  • Angelo Acciaiuoli, O.P. (26 Jun 1342–1355)[79]
  • Francesco degli Atti (1355–1356)[80]
  • Filippo dell'Antella (1357–1363)
  • Pietro Corsini (1 Sep 1363 Appointed – 7 Jun 1370)[81]
  • Angelo Ricasoli (1370–1383)[82]
  • Angelo Acciaioli (1383 Appointed – 20 Nov 1385)[83]
  • Bartolomeo Uliari, O.Min. (1385–1389)[84]
  • Onofrio Visdomini, O.E.S.A. (1390–1400)[85]
  • Alamanno Adimari (1400–1401)[86]
  • Jacopo Palladini (1401–1410)[87]
  • Francesco Zabarella (1410– 17 June 1411)[88]

Metropolitan Archbishops of FlorenceEdit

1411 to 1700Edit

since 1700Edit

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ "Archdiocese of Firenze {Florence}" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 7 October 2016.[self-published source]
  2. ^ "Metropolitan Archdiocese of Firenze" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved October 7, 2016.[self-published source]
  3. ^ Villani places "Saint Frontinus" here, one of Jesus' seventy-two disciples and a follower of Saint Peter, in the time of Nero. Lanzoni, p. 577.
  4. ^ Kehr, Italia pontificia III, p. 7.
  5. ^ Cappelletti, Le chiese d'Italia XVI, p. 568.
  6. ^ Cappelletti, p. 551. G. Mollat, Jean XXII: Lettres communes Tome quatrième (Paris: Fontemoing 1904), p. 165, no. 16165.
  7. ^ Jean-Charles-Léonard Simonde Sismondi (1840). Histoire des républiques italiennes du moyen âge (in French). Tome IV (nouvelle ed.). Paris: Furne et ce. pp. 86–90.
  8. ^ Francis Aidan Gasquet (1908). The Black Death of 1348 and 1349 (second ed.). London: G. Bell. pp. 23–29.
  9. ^ Giovanni Boccaccio (1855). The Decameron: Or Ten Days' Entertainment of Boccaccio. London: H. G. Bohn. pp. 1–6.
  10. ^ M. Zucchi, "The Misericordia of Florence," The Dublin Review 94 (1894), p. 339.
  11. ^ Carl Joseph Hefele, Histoire des conciles Tome VII, deuxième partie (Paris: Letouzey 1916), pp. 987-1105.
  12. ^ Ughelli, p. 7.
  13. ^ Ughelli, p. 8. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 217, note 1.
  14. ^ Ughelli, p. 8.
  15. ^ Benedictus XIV (1842). "Lib. I. caput secundum. De Synodi Dioecesanae utilitate". Benedicti XIV ... De Synodo dioecesana libri tredecim (in Latin). Tomus primus. Mechlin: Hanicq. pp. 42–49. John Paul II, Constitutio Apostolica de Synodis Dioecesanis Agendis (March 19, 1997): Acta Apostolicae Sedis 89 (1997), pp. 706-727.
  16. ^ Ughelli, III, p. 78.
  17. ^ Ughelli, p. 92.
  18. ^ Ughelli, p. 145. Cappelletti, p. 551.
  19. ^ J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XXVI (Venice: A. Zatta 1784), pp. 23-74.
  20. ^ Diocesana Synodus Florentiæ celebrata tertio non Maias. MDLXIX (in Latin). Florentiae: apud Bartholomaeum Sermartellium. 1569. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XXXVIbis (Venice: A. Zatta 1784), p. 989.
  21. ^ Medici, Alessandro de' (1589). Decreta dioecesanae Florentinae synodi. Celebrata ab illustriss. ... Alexandro Medice S.R.E. cardinali & archiepiscopo Florentino. 3. Id. Iulii 1589 (in Latin). Florentiae: apud Bartholomaeum Sermartellium.
  22. ^ J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XXXVIbis (Venice: A. Zatta 1784), p. 941.
  23. ^ Marzi Medici, Alessandro (1619). Decreta synodi dioecesanae Florentinae. Habita in metropolitana ecclesia die 14. & 15. mensis Maii 1619 (in Latin). Florentiae: apud Bartholomaeum Sermartellium, & fratres.
  24. ^ Marzi Medici, Alessandro (1623). Decreta synodi dioecesanae Florentinae, habita in metropolitana ecclesia die XVII mensis Maii 1623 (in Latin). Florentiae: apud B. Sermartellium & fratres.
  25. ^ J. D. Mansi, Louis Petit, J. B. Martin (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XXXVIter (Arnhem & Leipzig: H. Welter 1924), p. 133.
  26. ^ J. D. Mansi, Louis Petit, J. B. Martin (ed.), Tomus XXXVIter, p. 149.
  27. ^ J. D. Mansi, Louis Petit, J. B. Martin (ed.), Tomus XXXVIter, p. 221.
  28. ^ Niccolini, Pietro (1645). Decreta, et acta synodi dioecesanae Florentinae habitae in metropolitana ecclesia 17. mensis Maij anni 1645 (in Latin). Florentiae: ex Typographia Archiepiscopali.
  29. ^ Nerli, Francesco (1656). Constitutiones synodi dioecesanæ Florentinæ habitæ in metropolitana ecclesia pridie nonas Aprilis anno 1656. Ab illustriss. et reuerendiss. d.d. Francisco Nerlio archiepiscopo (in Latin). Firenze: typis F. Honofrij, typographi archiepiscopalis.
  30. ^ Nerli, Francesco (1663). Constitutiones synodi dioecesanæ Florentinæ habitæ in metropolitana ecclesia 6. Kal. Octobr. 1663 (in Latin). Firenze: ex officina Francisci Honuphrij Typographi Archiepiscopalis.
  31. ^ Nerli, Francesco (1666). Constitutiones synodi dioecesanæ Florentinæ habita in metropolitana ecclesia 9. Kalend. Octob. 1666 (in Latin). Firenze: ex officina Francisci Honuphrij typographi archiepiscopalis.
  32. ^ Nerli, Francesco (iuniore) (1669). Constitutiones synodi dioecesanæ Florentinæ habitæ in metropolitana ecclesia pridie 7. Kalend. Octob. 1669 (in Latin). Firenze: ex officina Francisci Honuphrij Typographi Archiepiscopalis.
  33. ^ Nerli, Francesco (iuniore) (1674). Constitutiones synodi dioecesanæ Florentinæ habitæ in metropolitana ecclesia pridie idus Septembris 1674 (in Latin). Firenze: ex officina Francisci Honuphrij Typographi Archiepiscopalis.
  34. ^ Nerli, Francesco (1678). Constitutiones synodi dioecesanæ Florentinæ habita in metropolitana ecclesia pridie Kal. Septembris 1678 (in Latin). Firenze: ex officina Francisci Honuphrij.
  35. ^ Nerli, Francesco (1681). Dioecesana synodus Florentina habita in ecclesia metropolitana die 27. Augusti anno salut. incarnat. 1681 sub auspiciis emin., ac reuer. d. d. Francisci cardin. Nerlii Dei, at apostholicæ sedis gratia archiep. Florentini (in Latin). Firenze: apud Vincentium Vangelisti archiepiscopalem typographum.
  36. ^ J. D. Mansi, Louis Petit, J. B. Martin (ed.), Tomus XXXVIter, p. 537.
  37. ^ J. D. Mansi, Louis Petit, J. B. Martin (ed.), Tomus XXXVIter, p. 841.
  38. ^ J. D. Mansi, Louis Petit, J. B. Martin (ed.), Tomus XXXVIter, p. 888.
  39. ^ Martelli, Giuseppe (1830). Decreta synodi dioecesanae Florentinae celebratae in ecclesia metropolitana die 24. Septembris 1732 (in Latin) (secunda ed.). Florentiae: in Archiepiscopali typographia ad Crucem Rubram.
  40. ^ Piovanelli, Silvano (1993). 34. Sinodo della Chiesa fiorentina primo dopo il Concilio Vaticano 2. 1988-1992: documento conclusivo (in Italian). Firenze.
  41. ^ Bishop Felix was present at the Roman council of Pope Miltiades on 7 October 313. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus II (Florence: A. Zatta 1759), p. 437. Richa, p. 167. Lanzoni, p. 578.
  42. ^ The 'Life of S. Zenobius' by Bishop Laurentius of Amalfi (1040–1048) is printed by Ughelli, Italia sacra III, pp. 11-18. Lanzoni, pp. 579-580.
  43. ^ Mauritius is said to have been killed by Atila the Hun and by Totila the Visigoth. Ughelli, pp. 19-20. Lanzoni, pp. 580-581: "In verità i cronisti italiani furono facili a far morire o tormentare i loro vescovi per opera del fiero Baduilla. Tuttavia non oso rigettare un vescovo Maurizio."
  44. ^ Bishop Reparatus signed the synodical letter (Epistola III) of Pope Agatho sent to the Roman emperors Constantine, Heraclius, and Tiberius in Constantinople. Ughelli, p. 20. Cappelletti, p. 447. J.P. Migne, Patrologiae Latinae Tomus LXXXVII (Paris 1863), p. 1240.
  45. ^ Speciosus: Gams, p. 747 column 2.
  46. ^ Bishop Thomas attended the Roman synod of 743 of Pope Zacharias. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XII (Florence: A. Zatta 1766), p. 384c. Ughelli, pp. 21-22.
  47. ^ Aliprandus was present at the Roman synod of Pope Eugenius II. Ughelli, p. 25. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XIV (Venice: A. Zatta 1761), p. 999.
  48. ^ Rodingus (Radingo, Ardingus): Ughelli, pp. 25-26. Cappelletti, pp. 452-453.
  49. ^ Gerardus: J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XV (Venice: A. Zatta 1770), p. 34.
  50. ^ Bishop Petrus was present at the Roman synod of Pope Nicholas I on 18 November 861. Mansi (ed.), Tomus XV, p. 603.
  51. ^ Andreas: Ughelli, pp. 26-27. Cappelletti, p. 460.
  52. ^ Bishop Grasulphus was the recipient of a grant of territory from the Emperor Lambert in 898. He was present at the Roman synod, held in the Lateran Palace in 904 by Pope Benedict IV. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XVIII (Venice: A. Zatta 1773), p. 241. Ughelli, pp. 27-28. Cappelletti, XVI, p. 460.
  53. ^ Podo: Cappelletti, pp. 460-461.
  54. ^ Raimbaldus: Ughelli, p. 28. Schwartz, p. 207.
  55. ^ Sichelmus: Ughelli, p. 28-29. Schwartz, p. 207.
  56. ^ In May 991, Bishop Podo made a grant of property: Lami II, p. 786 column 1. Podio: Schwartz, pp. 207-208.
  57. ^ Guido: Ughelli, p. 43. Schwartz, pp. 207-208.
  58. ^ Alibrando: Ughelli, pp. 45-50. Lami, p. 42-43 (document of 27 April 1013). Schwartz, p. 209.
  59. ^ Lambertus had been Prior of S. Apollinare in classe in Ravenna. Ughelli, pp. 50-53. Lami, I, p. 46. Schwartz, p. 209.
  60. ^ Acto, Hacto, Atho. Ughelli, pp. 53-62. Lami, I, p. 48. Schwartz, p. 209.
  61. ^ Gerardus first appears in documents on 9 January 1045. On 6 Dec 1058, at an uncanonical election held in Siena Gerardus was elected Pope Nicholas II. There was already a canonically elected pope in Rome, Benedict X (Bishop John of Velletri). The schism which followed disturbed the church for forty years. Schwartz, pp. 209-210.
  62. ^ A native of Pavia, Petrus was the son of the wealthy Teuzo Mezzabarba, who may have engaged in simony to get his son elected bishop of Florence. Petrus then angered Pope Alexander II by seeking confirmation from the Emperor rather than the Pope. On 13 February 1065, Bishop Petrus made a feudal grant: Lami II, p. 783 column 1. In 1067, complaints against Petrus were brought to Pope Alexander in the Roman synod of that year; Cardinal Peter Damiani was sent to Florence to deal with the complaints. When the full facts were known, however, Pope Alexander condemned Bishop Petrus as a simoniac, and had him deposed. Kehr, p. 8, nos.3-6. Ughelli, pp. 72-77. Cappelletti, pp. 489-498. Schwartz, p. 210.
  63. ^ Kehr, p. 8, no. 6, note; no. 7.
  64. ^ Cappelletti, pp. 505-506.
  65. ^ Rainerius died on 12 July 1113. Ughelli, pp. 77-89. Schwartz, p. 210.
  66. ^ Goffredo was the son of Count Albert of Prato. He is first attested on 22 September 1114, and died after 12 November 1142. Lami, p. 74 column 1, prints a document of Gotefredus dated 1 April 1146. Ughelli, pp. 89-95. Lami, I, pp. 73-74. Schwartz, p. 210.
  67. ^ Actius: Ughelli, pp. 94-95. Cappelletti, p. 517.
  68. ^ Ambrosius was a Vallombrosian monk and abbot. On 2 November 1155, Bishop Ambrosius made a land grant: Lami II, p. 763 column 2. He died on 20 May 1158. Ughelli, pp. 95-97. Cappelletti, p. 517.
  69. ^ Bishop Julius ratified a donation on 27 November 1158: Lami II, p. 854. On 8 August 1159, Cardinal Henricus, who had been delegated to hear a case between Julius of Florence and Tracia of Pistoria, sitting in Pisa, found in favor of the bishop of Pistoria. Bishop Julius received a gift on 6 January 1161: Lami I, p. 168. On 30 January 1178, Bishop Julius received the agreement of subjects to pay their dues: Lami II, p. 823 column 1. Kehr, p. 11 no. 22.
  70. ^ In July 1183, Bishop Bernardus made a land grant: Lami II, p. 763 column 2. Ughelli, pp. 101-103. Cappelletti, p. 518.
  71. ^ Paganus is omitted by Ughelli. Cappelletti, p. 518.
  72. ^ Petrus: Ughelli, pp. 103-105. Cappelletti, p. 518. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica I, p. 250, with note 1.
  73. ^ Bishop Ardingus had a Vicar, Marsoppinus, who took possession of a property on 8 June 1241. Lami II, p. 721.
  74. ^ Joannes Mangiadori: Eubel I, p. 250.
  75. ^ An election took place by the Chapter of the cathedral of Florence, and pruduced a disputed result: some supported Sciatta degli Ubaldini of Bologna, the rest supported Lothario della Tosa. The matter was referred to Rome, where both parties resigned their claims to Pope Honorius IV. He selected Jacobus of Perugia, who had been Prior of the convent of Santa Sabina in Rome, who was appointed on 28 May 1286, and made his solemn entry into Florence on 29 June. He died on 16 August 1286. Ughelli, p. 127. Cappelletti, pp. 534-540. Eubel I, p. 250.
  76. ^ Andrea, a Canon of the cathedral Chapter, was elected by the Chapter, and approved on 29 December 1286 by Pope Honorius IV. On 13 September 1295, Bishop Andrea was transferred to the diocese of Vicenza by Pope Boniface VIII. He died on 28 April 1296. Eubel I, pp. 250, 526.
  77. ^ Francesco Monaldeschi: Lami I, p. 168 column 1 (27 June 1299).
  78. ^ Franciscus died on 21 October 1341. Eubel I, p. 250.
  79. ^ Accaiauoli had been Bishop of Aquila (1328–1342). He was appointed Bishop of Florence on 26 June 1342 by Pope Clement VI. On 18 Mar 1355 Acciaiuoli was appointed Bishop of Monte Cassino by Pope Innocent VI. He died on 4 October 1357. Eubel I, pp. 98, 169, 250.
  80. ^ Francesco was named a cardinal on 23 December 1356 by Pope Innocent VI, and appointed Major Penitentiarius. He died of the plague in Avignon on 25 August or 4 September 1361. Cappelletti, pp. 557-558. Eubel I, pp. 19 no. 3; 250.
  81. ^ Corsini was appointed Cardinal-Priest of San Lorenzo in Damaso.
  82. ^ Ricasoli had previously been Bishop of Aversa. He was transferred to the diocese of Florence by Pope Urban V on 19 June 1370. He was transferred to the diocese of Faenza on 9 February 1383. He was transferred to Arezzo in 1391. Eubel I, pp. 246, 250.
  83. ^ Acciaioli was appointed Cardinal-Priest of San Lorenzo in Damaso by Urban VI on 17 December 1384. He died at Pisa on 31 May 1408. Eubel I, pp. 24 no. 36; 250.
  84. ^ Bartolomeo: Eubel I, p. 250.
  85. ^ Onofrio: Eubel I, p. 250.
  86. ^ Adimari was named Bishop of Florence on 13 December 1400 by Pope Boniface XI. On 16 Nov 1401 Adimari was appointed Archbishop of Taranto. Eubel I, p. 250.
  87. ^ A native of Teramo, Palladini had been Bishop of Monopoli (1391–1401). He was transferred from the archbishopric of Taranto (where he had been appointed on 24 March 1401) on 16 November 1401 by Pope Boniface IX (Roman Obedience). He was transferred to the diocese of Spoleto on 18 July 1410 by John XXIII. He died in 1417. Eubel I, pp. 251, 347, 461, 473.
  88. ^ Zabarella had been Archpriest of the cathedral of Padua. He was appointed Bishop of Florence by John XXIII on 18 July 1410. He was named a cardinal on 6 June 1411, and allowed to keep the diocese of Florence as Administrator. He resigned the administratorship on 17 June 1411. He died at the Council of Constance on 26 September 1417. Eubel I, pp. 33 no. 15; 251.
  89. ^ Corsini had been Archdeacon of Curavada in the Church of Bayeux. He was named Bishop of Florence on 16 July 1411 by John XXIII. He died on 18 March 1434. Eubel I, p. 251 with note 12.
  90. ^ Vitelleschi already held the title of Patriarch of Alexandria when he was appointed Bishop of Florence on 12 October 1435 by Pope Eugenius IV. He was named a cardinal on 9 August 1437. He was appointed Administrator of Trogir (Traù), exchanging sees with Ludovico Scarampi. He died on 2 April 1440. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica II, pp. 7 no. 3; 154, 253.
  91. ^ On 6 August 1437 he exchanged the see of Traù (Traguriensis) with Bishop Vitelleschi for the diocese of Florence. On 18 Dec 1439 he was appointed Patriarch of Aquileia by Pope Eugenius IV. He died on 22 March 1465. Eubel II, pp. 92, 154, 253.
  92. ^ Zabarella held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure, and was a Protonotary Apostolic. He had been Archpriest of the cathedral of Padua, and then Archbishop of Spalato (Split) in Dalmatia (1428–1439). He was transferred to the diocese of Florence by Pope Eugenius IV on 18 December 1439. He died on 21 December 1445. Eubel I, p. 460; II, pp. 154.
  93. ^ Antonino: Eubel II, pp. 154.
  94. ^ BonarliEubel II, pp. 154.
  95. ^ Diotisalvi: Eubel II, pp. 154.
  96. ^ Riario: Eubel II, pp. 154.
  97. ^ Eubel II, pp. 154; III, p. 197.
  98. ^ Pazzi: Eubel, Hierarchia catholica III, p. 197.
  99. ^ On 19 Nov 1523 Medici was elected pope, taking the throne name Clement VII. Eubel III, pp. 18 with notes 1-3; 197 with note 3.
  100. ^ Ridolfi: Eubel III, p. 197.
  101. ^ Buondelmonti: Eubel III, p. 197.
  102. ^ Ridolfi: Eubel III, p. 197.
  103. ^ Altoviti: Eubel III, p. 197.
  104. ^ On 1 Apr 1605 Medici was elected Pope, taking the throne name Leo XI. Eubel III, p. 197.
  105. ^ Marzi, who held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure, had been Bishop of Fiesole (1596–1605). He was transferred to the diocese of Florence by Pope Paul V on 27 June 1605. He died on 13 August 1630. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, pp. 187, 188.
  106. ^ bardi: Gauchat, p. 188.
  107. ^ Niccolini: Gauchat, p. 188.
  108. ^ Gauchat, p. 188. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 203, note 2.
  109. ^ Nerli: Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 203 with note 3.
  110. ^ Morigia; Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 203 with note 4.
  111. ^ Strozzi: Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 203 with note 5.
  112. ^ Gherardesca; Ritzler-Sefrin, p. 203 with note 6.
  113. ^ Martelli: Ritzler-Sefrin, p. 203 with note 7.
  114. ^ Incontri: Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 217 with note 2.
  115. ^ Martini: Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 217 with note 3.
  116. ^ Antonelli had been Bishop of Gubbio (1982–88), Archbishop of Perugia-Città della Pieve (1988–95), and then Secretary General of the Italian Episcopal Conference (1995-2001). He was named Archbishop of Florence on 21 March 2001. On 7 Jun 2008 Cardinal Antonelli was appointed President of the Pontifical Council for the Family; he retired on 26 June 2012.

BibliographyEdit

Reference for bishopsEdit

StudiesEdit

External linksEdit

  • GCatholic.org
  • Catholic Hierarchy
  • Davies, Gerald Stanley (1916). Renascence: The Sculptured Tombs of the Fifteenth Century in Rome, with Chapters on the Previous Centuries from 1100. E. P. Dutton.

Coordinates: 43°47′00″N 11°15′00″E / 43.7833°N 11.2500°E / 43.7833; 11.2500