Anti-monarchism in Japan

Anti-monarchism in Japan was a minor force during the twentieth century.

HistoryEdit

In 1908, a letter allegedly written by Japanese revolutionaries denied the Emperor's divinity, and threatened his life.[1] In 1910, Kōtoku Shūsui and 10 others plotted to assassinate the Emperor.[2] In 1923, 1925 and 1932 Emperor Hirohito survived assassination attempts.[3]

After World War II, the communists were antagonistic to the Emperor. The Japanese Communist Party demanded the abolition of the emperor system.[4] They boycotted the formal opening of the National Diet in 1949 because of the presence of Hirohito.[5] The Japanese Communist Party continued to be antagonistic after Hirohito's death.[6]

During the Imperial visits to Otsu, Japan in 1951, and Hokkaido in 1954, Communist posters and handbills antagonistic to the Imperial Family Members were plastered in the cities.[7][8]

In 1951, three thousand students in Kyoto University protested against the reign of Emperor Hirohito.[9]

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "PLOT AGAINST THE MIKADO. ALLEGED ANARCHIST ASSOCIATION. AMONG JAPANESE IN AMERICA". Evening News. 17 January 1908.
  2. ^ "Kōtoku Shūsui". Encyclopædia Britannica.
  3. ^ Masako Gavin, Ben Middleton (Aug 21, 2013). Japan and the High Treason Incident. Routledge.
  4. ^ "Japanese Communist Party Asks End of Feudal System". Berkeley Daily Gazette. February 23, 1946.
  5. ^ "Anti-Hirohito Diet Boycott". The Sydney Morning Herald. March 21, 1949.
  6. ^ "JAPAN'S ROLE: A MILESTONE; Hirohito's Death Puts Focus on New Identity". The New York Times. January 8, 1989.
  7. ^ "Horrified Citizens Scrub Walls of Opposition As Hirohito Visits". Eugene Register-Guard. November 16, 1951.
  8. ^ "Hirohito, Wife Tour Island". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. August 9, 1954.
  9. ^ "3,000 Leftist Students Heckle Japanese Emperor". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. November 13, 1951.