Angelo Borrelli

Angelo Borrelli (born 18 November 1964) is an Italian government official, who is serving as Head of the Civil Protection, since 8 August 2017.[1]

Angelo Borrelli
Angelo Borrelli 2018 crop.jpg
Extraordinary Commissioner for the
COVID-19 Emergency
Assumed office
31 January 2020
Preceded byPosition established
Head of the Civil Protection
Assumed office
8 August 2017
Preceded byFabrizio Curcio
Personal details
Born (1964-11-18) 18 November 1964 (age 55)
Santi Cosma e Damiano, Lazio, Italy
Alma materUniversity of Cassino

BiographyEdit

Borrelli was born in Santi Cosma e Damiano, near Latina in Lazio region. He graduated in Economics at the University of Cassino, becoming auditor and tax advisor.[2]

Leading member of Civil ProtectionEdit

In 2000 he entered the National Office for Civil Service. In 2002 he was appointed executive of the Civil Protection Department, the government body in Italy that deals with the prediction, prevention and management of exceptional events. From 2010 to August 2017 he served as Deputy Head of the Civil Protection, and when Fabrizio Curcio resigned, Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni appointed him new Head of the Civil Protection.[3]

As Head of the Civil Protection he had to face the reconstruction after the August 2016 Central Italy earthquake, which was still to be completed.

COVID-19 pandemicEdit

On 31 January, the Italian Council of Ministers appointed Borrelli Extraordinary Commissioner for COVID-19 pandemic.[4][5]

In February 2020, Italy became one of the world's main centres for confirmed cases of COVID-19, a virus from China which caused a respiratory disease.[6] In late January, the government banned all flights from and to China, becoming the first European country to adopt this measure.[7]

On 22 February, the Council of Ministers announced a bill to contain the COVID-19 outbreak, quarantining more than 50,000 people from 11 different municipalities in Northern Italy. Prime Minister Conte stated: "In the outbreak areas, entry and exit will not be provided. Suspension of work activities and sport events has already been ordered in those areas."[8]

Schools were closed in 10 municipalities in Lombardy, one in Veneto and in Emilia-Romagna. In some areas, all public events were cancelled and commercial activities were halted.[9] Regional train services suspended the stops in the most affected areas – with trains not stopping at Codogno, Maleo and Casalpusterlengo stations.[10][11] Universities in Lombardy suspended all activities from 23 February.[12][13][14]

On 8 March 2020, on the advise of the Civil Protection scientific committee, Prime Minister Conte extended the quarantine to all of Lombardy and 14 other northern provinces, putting more than a quarter of the national population under lockdown.[15] On the following day, he announced in a press conference that all measures previously applied only in the so-called "red zones" had been extended to the whole country, putting de facto 60 million people in lockdown. He later proceeded to officially sign the executive decree.[16][17] This measure was described as the largest lockdown in human history.[18][19][20][21]

 
Borrelli during the emergency

On 20 March, the Ministry of Health ordered tighter regulations on free movement. The new measures banned open-air sports and running, except individually and in close proximity of one's residence. Parks, playgrounds and public green were closed down. Furthermore, movement across the country was further restricted, by banning "any movement towards a residence different from the main one", including holiday homes, during weekends and holidays.[22] While on the following day, Conte announced further restrictions within the nationwide lockdown, by halting all non-essential production, industries and businesses in Italy,[23] following the rise in the number of new cases and deaths in the previous days.[24][25]

On 24 March, a new decree imposed higher fines for the violation of the restrictive measures, and a regulation of the relationship between government and Parliament during the emergency. It included also the possibility of reducing or suspending public and private transport, and gave the regional governments power to impose additional restrictive regulations in their Regions for a maximum of seven days before being confirmed by national decree.[26][27]

On 1 April, the period of lockdown was extended until 13 April.[28] While on 6 April, Conte announced a new economic stimulus plan, consisting of €200 billion of state-guaranteed loans to companies and additional €200 billion of guarantees to support exports.[29] On 10 April, Conte made further announcements extending the lockdown until the 3rd of May, allowing some specific businesses, like bookstores and silviculture activities, to reopen under specific safe measures.[30] On the same day, he appointed a task force to relaunch Italy after the crisis; the team was led by Vittorio Colao and composed by a total of nineteen members, chosen among university professors, managers and public administration officers, which notably included Mariana Mazzucato and Enrico Giovannini.[31]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Chi è Angelo Borrelli, nominato Commissario per l'emergenza coronavirus
  2. ^ Angelo Borrelli nuovo capo Protezione civile: “Continuità”
  3. ^ Curcio lascia a sorpresa la Protezione Civile, Gentiloni nomina Borrelli
  4. ^ Chi è Angelo Borrelli, nominato Commissario per l'emergenza coronavirus
  5. ^ Coronavirus, Angelo Borrelli commissario straordinario: potrà anche requisire gli hotel
  6. ^ "Coronavirus, Italia prima in Europa per numero di contagi: è caccia ai focolai". Archived from the original on 23 February 2020. Retrieved 23 February 2020.
  7. ^ "Coronavirus, primi due casi confermati in Italia: sono turisti cinesi a Roma. Chiuso il traffico aereo con la Cina". Archived from the original on 25 February 2020. Retrieved 23 February 2020.
  8. ^ "Coronavirus, decreto del governo: nei comuni focolaio stop ad ingressi ed uscite. Conte: "Non trasformeremo l'Italia in un lazzaretto"". la Repubblica (in Italian). 2020-02-22. Retrieved 2020-02-22.
  9. ^ online, Redazione (2020-02-21). "Quali sono i Comuni che hanno chiuso le scuole per il Coronavirus". Corriere della Sera (in Italian). Retrieved 2020-02-23.
  10. ^ online, Redazione (2020-02-22). "Coronavirus, treni fermi per ore a Lecce e Milano. I convogli non-fermano nei Comuni a rischio del Lodigiano". Corriere della Sera (in Italian). Retrieved 2020-02-23.
  11. ^ "Coronavirus, per una settimana didattica sospesa nelle università lombarde. Comune di Milano e grandi aziende: i lavoratori a rischio restano a casa". la Repubblica (in Italian). 2020-02-22. Archived from the original on 22 February 2020. Retrieved 2020-02-23.
  12. ^ "news.unipv – Coronavirus: Sospensione delle attività didattiche dal 24/2 all'1/03". news.unipv (in Italian). Retrieved 2020-02-23.
  13. ^ "Coronavirus: misure urgenti per la comunità universitaria | Università degli Studi di Milano Statale". www.unimi.it. Retrieved 2020-02-23.
  14. ^ "Sospensione precauzionale delle attività didattiche | Università degli studi di Bergamo". www.unibg.it. Retrieved 2020-02-23.
  15. ^ "Coronavirus: Northern Italy quarantines 16 million people". BBC. 8 March 2020. Archived from the original on 8 March 2020. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  16. ^ "All of Italy is in lockdown as coronavirus cases rise". Archived from the original on 9 March 2020. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  17. ^ "Coronavirus: Italian PM extends lockdown to entire country". Archived from the original on 23 March 2020. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  18. ^ "On Day 1 of Broad Lockdown, a Debate Arises: Can Italians Follow the Rules?". Archived from the original on 9 March 2020. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  19. ^ Lyons, Kim (7 March 2020). "Italy locks down northern region in response to coronavirus outbreak". The Verge. Archived from the original on 8 March 2020. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  20. ^ Horowitz, Jason (7 March 2020). "Italy Locks Down Much of the Country's North Over the Coronavirus". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 8 March 2020. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  21. ^ To contain coronavirus, Italy will restrict movement across much of its northern region, including the city of Milan Archived 9 March 2020 at the Wayback Machine, The Washington Post, Chico Harlan and Stefano Pitrelli, 7 March 2020. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  22. ^ "Le nuove restrizioni decise dal governo". Il Post (in Italian). 20 March 2020. Archived from the original on 21 March 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  23. ^ "Coronavirus, Milano trema: 634 casi in un giorno. Fontana chiama Conte: chiudere tutto, Esercito per strada". ilmessaggero.it (in Italian). Archived from the original on 20 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  24. ^ Farrer, Martin (22 March 2020). "Italy: PM warns of worst crisis since WW2 as coronavirus deaths leap by almost 800". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 22 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  25. ^ De Angelis, Alessandro (20 March 2020). ""Chiudete tutto, anche le fabbriche" (di A. De Angelis)". L'HuffPost (in Italian). Archived from the original on 21 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  26. ^ "Italy announces fines of up to €3,000 for breaking quarantine rules". thelocal.it. 24 March 2020. Archived from the original on 25 March 2020. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  27. ^ "Cosa ha detto Giuseppe Conte". Il Post (in Italian). 24 March 2020. Archived from the original on 25 March 2020. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  28. ^ Henley, Jon (1 April 2020). "Italy extends lockdown amid signs coronavirus infection rate is easing". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 1 April 2020. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  29. ^ Leali, Giorgio (6 April 2020). "Italy adopts €400B liquidity plan amid coronavirus crisis". POLITICO. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  30. ^ Coronavirus, il premier Conte: "Chiusura fino al 3 maggio, non possiamo cedere adesso"
  31. ^ Coronavirus, ecco la task force per la Fase 2