Angelo Alessio

Angelo Alessio (born 29 April 1965 in Capaccio) is an Italian football manager and former player.

Angelo Alessio
Angelo Alessio (Viceallenatore della Juventus).jpg
Alessio in 2012
Personal information
Date of birth (1965-04-29) 29 April 1965 (age 55)
Place of birth Capaccio, Italy
Height 1.81 m (5 ft 11 12 in)
Playing position(s) Midfielder
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1984–1987 Avellino 48 (7)
1987–1992 Juventus 99 (11)
1988–1989Bologna (loan) 29 (4)
1992–1995 Bari 77 (12)
1995–1997 Cosenza 57 (15)
1997 Avellino 5 (1)
1997–1998 Modena 18 (1)
Teams managed
2002 Napoli (assistant)
2003 Napoli (assistant)
2004–2005 Imolese
2006–2007 Massese
2008 SPAL
2010–2011 Siena (assistant)
2011–2014 Juventus (assistant)
2012 Juventus (caretaker)
2014–2016 Italy (assistant)
2016–2018 Chelsea (assistant)
2019 Kilmarnock
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Playing careerEdit

A central midfielder, Alessio started his professional career as a player with then-Serie A club Avellino in 1984. He was then signed by Italian powerhouse Juventus in 1987, with whom he played until 1992 (except for a season loan at Bologna in 1988–89), winning a Coppa ItaliaUEFA Cup double in 1990.[1] He then moved to Serie A club Bari, before to join Cosenza in the Serie B and then returning to Avellino (now in Serie C1) in 1997. He ended his career in 1998 after a season with Modena.

Coaching careerEdit

After retirement, Alessio joined Napoli as a coaching staff member, first in charge of the youth teams and subsequently as a first team assistant. He then served as head coach for a number of Serie C2 teams (Imolese, Massese, SPAL); however it was not until his combination with Antonio Conte at Siena where his talents were truly noticed.

After achieving promotion out of the Serie B under Conte with Siena, the pair accepted the job at Juventus. At Juventus, Alessio enjoyed three consecutive years of Serie A domination, with three league titles and two Italian Super Cups. After three years at Juventus, in which he once managed as caretaker from October 2012 to December 2012, he again joined Conte at the Italy national football team. After a somewhat successful term and Italy's exit out of the Euros, Alessio parted with Italy and again to followed Conte to Chelsea.[2][3] In January 2019 he confirmed his intention to start a career of his own as a head coach, thus effectively ending his long-time collaboration with Conte.

On 16 June 2019, Alessio was named manager of Scottish Premiership club Kilmarnock.[4] In his first matches in charge, Kilmarnock lost in Europa League qualification to Welsh Premier League club Connah's Quay Nomads.[5] Alessio was sacked by Kilmarnock in December 2019, with the team sitting in fifth place.[5]

Style of playEdit

A versatile player, Alessio was known for his willingness to play not only anywhere in midfield, but also in almost any position across the entire pitch. Usually deployed as a central midfielder, he was also frequently played as a second striker during his time with Avellino.[1]

Managerial statisticsEdit

As of match played 14 December 2019
Managerial record by team and tenure
Team Nat From To Record Ref
G W D L GF GA GD Win %
Kilmarnock   16 June 2019 17 December 2019 22 8 6 8 20 24 −4 036.36 [6]
Career Total 22 8 6 8 20 24 −4 036.36

HonoursEdit

Avellino
Juventus[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Bedeschi, Stefano (29 April 2013). "Gli eroi in bianconero: Angelo ALESSIO" (in Italian). tuttojuve.com. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  2. ^ "Men - Official Site - Chelsea Football Club". ChelseaFC.
  3. ^ "Backroom team unveiled - Official Site - Chelsea Football Club". ChelseaFC.
  4. ^ "Kilmarnock appoint Angelo Alessio as the club's new manager". BBC Sport. 16 June 2019. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Angelo Alessio: Italian sacked as Kilmarnock manager". BBC Sport. 17 December 2019. Retrieved 17 December 2019.
  6. ^ "Kilmarnock FC: Matches". Soccerway. Perform Group. Retrieved 11 July 2019.
  7. ^ Rota, Davide (3 December 2003). "Italy - Torneo Estivo 1986". RSSSF. Retrieved 1 October 2019.