Andrew Maynard (boxer)

Andrew Maynard (born April 8, 1964) is an American former professional boxer who competed from 1989 to 2000. As an amateur boxer, he won the Gold Medal in the Light Heavyweight division at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea.

Andrew Maynard
Boxer Andrew Maynard, 1987.JPEG
Maynard at the 1987 Pan American Games
Personal information
BornCheverly, Maryland

Military serviceEdit

Andrew Maynard started boxing while serving in the United States Army. He was a cook stationed at Fort Carson, Colorado and his final military rank was specialist.[1]

Amateur careerEdit

As an amateur boxer, Maynard was a relentless pressure fighter — often throwing 1,000 punches per bout.

Maynard was the 1987 and 1988 United States Amateur Boxing Champion in the Light Heavyweight division (178 lbs.). He won the Bronze Medal at the 1987 Pan American Games, where he first burst into international prominence beating up on Cuban world champion Pablo Romero only to collapse in the second round without being hit. Later, Maynard acknowledged that he had suffered a broken ankle during a pickup basketball game the day before the Romero bout but didn't tell anybody about it. "I figure that I owed myself some kind of a gold medal after that situation," he said. So, at the 1988 Summer Olympics, Maynard methodically avoided all basketball courts in Seoul.[2]

Pan Am Box-Offs (178 lbs.), International Center of the Broadmoor, Colorado Springs, Colorado, July 1987:

  • Defeated Joseph Pemberton.

In the United States Olympic Box-Offs held from July 16 - 17, 1988 at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, Nevada, Maynard had to earn a spot on the 1988 United States Olympic Boxing Team by defeating fellow soldier Alfred “Ice” Cole in two bouts on consecutive nights. The judges’ scores for each respective bout was 4-1 in favor of Maynard.

He was one of three amateur boxers — the other two being Kelcie Banks (125 lbs.) and Riddick “Big Daddy” Bowe (Super Hvt.) — who lost in the Olympic trials but made the 1988 United States Olympic Boxing Team by attaining two wins in the United States Olympic Box-Offs.

Prior to competing in the United States Olympic Box-Offs, and since 1986, Maynard had won nine of ten boxing competitions — including the two national championships and an armed forces championship. Subsequently, and deservedly so, the determined 24-year-old had developed a reputation as one of the United States’ best amateur boxers at that point in time with a relatively limited but deceiving 35-5 amateur boxing record.

Maynard went on to win the Light Heavyweight Gold Medal for the United States at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea — averaging an overwhelming 150 punches per round and culminating in the shutout of his Russian opponent on points in the gold medal bout. He dedicated his gold medal win in honor of his father, Theodore “Slim” Maynard.

The highest prize in amateur boxing was an amazing achievement for a boxer who picked up the gloves to compete only five years earlier.

Results were:

Maynard worked on the inside against Shanavazov throughout the gold medal bout, with both fighters leaning against each other, and was relentless in beating the Russian to the punch. He was successful in repeatedly throwing left hooks to the body in the first two rounds, while landing a hard right to the head of Shanavazov in the final round.

The light heavyweight competition in the 1988 Summer Olympics included boxers representing 26 countries.

Along with “King” Kennedy McKinney (Bantamweight division) and “Merciless” Ray Mercer (Heavyweight division), Maynard was one of three Americans to capture gold for the 1988 United States Olympic Boxing Team in Seoul. He was the first American to win the Light Heavyweight Gold Medal since Leon Spinks in 1976. Maynard is one of seven Americans to win the Light Heavyweight Gold Medal in the history of the Olympic Games, including Muhammad Ali in 1960.

Professional careerEdit

Following the Olympics, Maynard made the decision to move to Laurel, Maryland where he began his professional career by signing with the management team of “Sugar” Ray Leonard and Mike Trainer.

Maynard quickly became known for his hard hitting along with his outgoing personality and trademark smile. Maynard’s classic one-punch “KO” of Arthur “Butch” Hall in 1989, a punch described in the live telecast as a “freight train right”, was featured on a video of “Boxing’s Greatest Hits.” His boxing monikers included “BAM” (“Boxing Andrew Maynard”) and “Smilin’ Drew”.

Maynard won his first 12 bouts in the light heavyweight division (175 lbs), prior to getting stopped in the seventh round by Bobby Czyz. His apparent shift of training styles from that of a puncher to a boxer during this period was a subject of debate and discussion.

Maynard then went on a six-fight winning streak, stopping former world light heavyweight champion Matthew Saad Muhammad in 1991 after a barrage of punches thrown over a little more than two rounds and setting up a bout with Frank Tate. Tate dropped Maynard in the 11th round, prompting the referee to halt the contest.

Maynard, who won the NABF Light Heavyweight Title by a majority decision against Mike Sedillo on April 1, 1990, lost his championship belt to Tate after having successfully defending it on four occasions.

Maynard, who fought at 178 pounds as an amateur, had difficulty adjusting to the lower 175-pound light heavyweight limit on the pro level and eventually transitioned to the cruiserweight division.

Maynard moved up to cruiserweight to challenge WBC World Cruiserweight champion Anaclet Wamba in a title bout held in Paris, France on October 16, 1992. Knocked down in the first round, the typically slow-starting American battled back courageously and lost by a 12-round unanimous decision with one judge having the bout as close as 113-116.

The championship bout versus Wamba was Maynard’s only world title opportunity and only his second bout scheduled in the cruiserweight division. Conceding five pounds at the weigh-in which occurred the day before, Maynard traded punches throughout the bout held the next night with what appeared to be a considerably bigger opponent and was effective at times in landing shots to the body of Wamba. In a display of good sportsmanship by all, Maynard was invited to, and attended, Wamba’s victory party and was well-received by the French fans in attendance.

After losing to Wamba, Maynard fought on in obscurity. Among his notable fights which followed were a knockout loss to Thomas Hearns and a stoppage at heavyweight to Brian Nielsen.

Maynard retired in 2000 and lives in Harlingen, Texas with his common law wife, Cynthia Ann Montgomery. For several years, Maynard served as a youth boxing trainer in Harlingen after being recruited for the position by the Harlingen Foundation for Valley Sports. For a short period of time, he worked in a public relations capacity for USA Boxing in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Maynard is the proud father of three children.

In March 1996, the Country of Nicaragua issued a stamp in honor of Maynard and in his likeness. He was inducted into the “Maryland State Athletic Hall of Fame” in 2001. Maynard was a 2016 inductee of the “Washington, D.C. Boxing Hall of Fame” and, in 2019, was one of five members of the inaugural class of Texas’ “Rio Grande Valley Boxing Hall of Fame”.

Professional boxing recordEdit

26 Wins (21 knockouts, 5 decisions), 13 Losses (9 knockouts, 4 decisions), 1 Draw [3]
Result Record Opponent Type Round Date Location Notes
Loss 14-1-1   Gary "The Whip" Wilcox TKO 10 20/10/2000   Albany, New York, U.S.
Win 14-10   Tyler "Working Man" Hughes SD 6 29/04/2000   Scottsbluff, Nebraska, U.S.
Loss 15-22-5   John "Killer" Kiser TKO 1 05/02/2000   Denver, Colorado, U.S. Referee stopped the bout at 1:59 of the first round.
Win 3-1   Joe Escamilla TKO 5 25/09/1999   Scottsbluff, Nebraska, U.S.
Draw 7-3-2   Leon "Shades of" Gray PTS 6 29/07/1999   Denver, Colorado, U.S.
Loss 29-0   "Super" Brian Nielsen TKO 6 18/10/1996   Vejle, Denmark
Loss 12-4-1   Justin Fortune TD 4 29/05/1996   Rochester, Washington, U.S.
Loss 14-0   Torsten May KO 10 20/04/1996   Düsseldorf, Germany
Loss 33-1   Kenny Keene UD 10 13/03/1996   Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Loss 18-0   Sergei Kobozev TKO 10 27/08/1994   Miami Beach, Florida, U.S. USBA Cruiserweight Title. Referee stopped the bout at 1:37 of the tenth round.
Win 15-36-2   Danny Wofford PTS 8 20/07/1994   Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S.
Win 16-7-1   Tim "Scrap Iron" Johnson TKO 2 11/05/1994   Annandale, Virginia, U.S. Referee stopped the bout at 2:36 of the second round.
Win 7-11   Alonzo Cutchins TKO 1 02/04/1994   Richmond, Virginia, U.S. Referee stopped the bout at 1:32 of the first round.
Loss 50-4-1   Thomas "Hitman" Hearns TKO 1 06/11/1993   Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. Referee stopped the bout at 2:34 of the first round.
Loss 10-0   Egerton Marcus RTD 8 22/05/1993   Washington, D.C., U.S. NABF Light Heavyweight Title.
Win 7-8   Larry Davis KO 2 26/03/1993   Erie, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Loss 26-5   Eric Nicoletta UD 10 29/01/1993   Nimes, France
Win 3-9-1   Charles Price TKO - referee stoppage! 7 09/12/1992   Virginia Beach, U.S.
Loss 38-2   Anaclet Wamba UD 12 16/10/1992   Bercy, France WBC Cruiserweight Title.
Win 16-6   Jeff McCall KO 4 29/08/1992   Fredericksburg, Virginia, U.S. McCall knocked out at 2:12 of the fourth round.
Loss 28-2   Frank Tate TKO 11 10/01/1992   New York City, U.S. NABF Light Heavyweight Title.
Win 39-14-3   Matthew Saad Muhammad TKO 3 29/10/1991   Washington, D.C., U.S. Referee stopped the bout at 0:20 of the third round.
Win 13-1-1   Ed Mack TKO 10 18/06/1991   Washington, D.C., U.S. NABF Light Heavyweight Title. Referee stopped the bout at 2:41 of the tenth round.
Win 9-0-1   Govoner Chavers TKO 12 20/04/1991   Stateline, Nevada, U.S. NABF Light Heavyweight Title.
Win 10-3-1   "Lightning" Lenzie Morgan TKO 8 26/02/1991   Washington, D.C., U.S. NABF Light Heavyweight Title. Referee stopped the bout at 1:02 of the eighth round.
Win 19-24   Robert Curry TKO 5 24/01/1991   Owings Mills, Maryland, U.S. Referee stopped the bout at 2:45 of the fifth round.
Win 12-9-1   Keith "Sir Jabalot" McMurray UD 8 25/10/1990   Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.
Loss 35-5   Bobby "Matinee Idol" Czyz KO 7 24/06/1990   Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S. Maynard knocked out at 0:42 of the seventh round.
Win 14-4   Art Jimmerson RTD 3 29/04/1990   Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S. NABF Light Heavyweight Title.
Win 22-7   Mike Sedillo MD 12 01/04/1990   Stateline, Nevada, U.S. NABF Light Heavyweight Title.
Win 15-4-2   Kemper Morton TKO 3 02/02/1990   Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.
Win 11-3-2   Mike DeVito UD 8 07/12/1989   Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.
Win 5-5   Carl "Little Truth" Williams TKO 5 12/09/1989   Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S.
Win 7-11-1   Arthur "Butch" Hall KO 5 15/08/1989   West Orange, New Jersey, U.S. Hall knocked out at 0:46 of the fifth round.
Win 8-1   Greg Townes KO 3 15/07/1989   Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S.
Win 12-5-1   "Cowboy" Stephen Schwann TKO 1 12/06/1989   Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. Referee stopped the bout at 2:34 of the first round.
Win 5-9   John "King Bee" Keys TKO 6 22/05/1989   Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S. Referee stopped the bout at 2:10 of the sixth round.
Win 1-2   Anthony Williams TKO 2 18/04/1989   Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S.
Win 1-0   Rodney Brown TKO 2 25/03/1989   Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. Referee stopped the bout at 2:29 of the second round.
Win --   Zack Worthy TKO 1 24/02/1989   Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S. Referee stopped the bout at 2:49 of the first round.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Army Olympic Update". Army. 38 (11): 71. November 1988. ISSN 0004-2455. Retrieved 2019-06-18.
  2. ^ Boxers Rise From Swamp By Dave Nightingale, St Louis Sporting News, October 10, 1988.
  3. ^ http://boxrec.com/list_bouts.php?human_id=3432&cat=boxer[dead link]

External linksEdit