Andrei Medvedev (tennis)

Andrei Medvedev (Ukrainian: Андрій Медведєв, romanizedAndriy Medvedyev) (born 31 August 1974) is a former top five professional tennis player from Ukraine. He reached the final of the French Open in 1999, the French Open semifinals in 1993 and won four Masters titles during his career, achieving a career-high ranking of four in May 1994.

Andrei Medvedev
Andrey Medvedev 2012.JPG
Country (sports) Soviet Union (1991)
 Ukraine (1991–2001)
ResidenceMonte Carlo, Monaco
Born (1974-08-31) 31 August 1974 (age 46)
Kyiv, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet Union
Height1.93 m (6 ft 4 in)
Turned pro1991
Retired2001
PlaysRight-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money$6,721,560
Singles
Career record321–213
Career titles11
Highest rankingNo. 4 (16 May 1994)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian OpenQF (1995)
French OpenF (1999)
Wimbledon4R (1994)
US OpenQF (1993)
Other tournaments
Tour FinalsSF (1993)
Grand Slam CupSF (1999)
Doubles
Career record29–37
Career titles0
Highest rankingNo. 185 (5 July 1993)

CareerEdit

In 1991, Medvedev won the junior singles title at the French Open.

As a 17 year old the following year, Medvedev won his first two ATP-tour titles in Genoa and Stuttgart (where he beat world no. 2 Stefan Edberg, and finished the season ranked within the world's top 25.

His most successful tournament was the Hamburg Masters (formerly the German Open), which he won three times (1994, 1995 and 1997).[1] He reached a career-high singles ranking of World No. 4.

In the late 1990s, Medvedev's form and results began to flounder until he unexpectedly reached the final of the 1999 French Open where - ranked 100 - he defeated Dinu Pescariu, Pete Sampras, Byron Black, Arnaud Di Pasquale, Gustavo Kuerten and Fernando Meligeni en route.[2] Medvedev dominated the first two sets of the final against Andre Agassi before Agassi mounted a come-from-behind victory, which allowed him to complete a career Grand Slam.[3] Afterwards, Medvedev did not score further notable results, and retired from the tour in 2001.

One main rival of Medvedev's was Sergi Bruguera. While their head-to-head record ended deadlocked at 5–5, Bruguera was able to win their two most important matches — the semi-finals and quarter-finals of the 1993 and 1994 French Opens respectively, with Bruguera winning both matches in straight sets. Medvedev lost six times to the eventual French Open champion (1992–95, 1997 and 1999).

Personal lifeEdit

His sister, Natalia Medvedeva, formerly a top 25 player on the WTA Tour, partnered with Andrei to represent Ukraine at the seventh Hopman Cup in 1995, finishing as runners-up to Germany's Boris Becker and Anke Huber (Medvedev's girlfriend back then) in the final.[4]

He bears no relation to current ATP player, Daniil Medvedev.

Grand Slam finalsEdit

Singles: 1 (1 runner-up)Edit

Result Year Championship Surface Opponent Score
Loss 1999 French Open Clay   Andre Agassi 6–1, 6–2, 4–6, 3–6, 4–6

Masters Series finalsEdit

Singles: 5 (4 titles, 1 runner-up)Edit

Result Year Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Loss 1993 Paris Masters Carpet   Goran Ivanišević 4–6, 2–6, 6–7(2–7)
Win 1994 Monte Carlo Masters Clay   Sergi Bruguera 7–5, 6–1, 6–3
Win 1994 Hamburg Masters Clay   Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6–4, 6–4, 3–6, 6–3
Win 1995 Hamburg Masters Clay   Goran Ivanišević 6–3, 6–2, 6–1
Win 1997 Hamburg Masters Clay   Félix Mantilla 6–0, 6–4, 6–2

Career finalsEdit

Singles: 18 (11 titles, 7 runners-up)Edit

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0–1)
Tennis Masters Cup (0–0)
ATP Masters Series (4–1)
ATP Championship Series (3–0)
ATP Tour (4–5)
Titles by surface
Hard (2–0)
Grass (0–1)
Clay (9–5)
Carpet (0–1)
Result No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Win 1. Jun 1992 Genoa, Italy Clay   Guillermo Pérez Roldán 6–3, 6–4
Win 2. Jul 1992 Stuttgart, Germany Clay   Wayne Ferreira 6–1, 6–4, 6–7(5–7), 2–6, 6–1
Win 3. Sep 1992 Bordeaux, France Clay   Sergi Bruguera 6–3, 1–6, 6–2
Win 4. Apr 1993 Estoril, Portugal Clay   Karel Nováček 6–4, 6–2
Win 5. Apr 1993 Barcelona, Spain Clay   Sergi Bruguera 6–7(7–9), 6–3, 7–5, 6–4
Loss 1. Jun 1993 Halle, Germany Grass   Henri Leconte 2–6, 3–6
Win 6. Aug 1993 New Haven, USA Hard   Petr Korda 7–5, 6–4
Loss 2. Nov 1993 Paris, France Carpet (i)   Goran Ivanišević 4–6, 2–6, 6–7(2–7)
Loss 3. Apr 1994 Estoril, Portugal Clay   Carlos Costa 6–4, 5–7, 4–6
Win 7. Apr 1994 Monte Carlo, Monaco Clay   Sergi Bruguera 7–5, 6–1, 6–3
Win 8. May 1994 Hamburg, Germany Clay   Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6–4, 6–4, 3–6, 6–3
Loss 4. Aug 1994 Prague, Czech Republic Clay   Sergi Bruguera 3–6, 4–6
Win 9. May 1995 Hamburg, Germany Clay   Goran Ivanišević 6–3, 6–2, 6–1
Loss 5. Jul 1996 Båstad, Sweden Clay   Magnus Gustafsson 1–6, 3–6
Win 10. Aug 1996 Long Island, USA Hard   Martin Damm 7–5, 6–3
Win 11. May 1997 Hamburg, Germany Clay   Félix Mantilla 6–0, 6–4, 6–2
Loss 6. Jul 1998 Båstad, Sweden Clay   Magnus Gustafsson 2–6, 3–6
Loss 7. Jun 1999 French Open, Paris, France Clay   Andre Agassi 6–1, 6–2, 4–6, 3–6, 4–6

Doubles: 1 (1 runner-up)Edit

Result No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Loss 1. Nov 1999 Moscow, Russia Carpet (I)   Marat Safin   Justin Gimelstob
  Daniel Vacek
6–2, 6–1

Team: 1 (1 runner-up)Edit

Result No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Loss 1. Jan 1995 Perth, Australia Hard   Natalia Medvedeva   Anke Huber
  Boris Becker
0–2

Singles performance timelineEdit

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A NH
(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (NH) not held. SR=strike rate (events won/competed)
Tournament 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 Career SR Career Win-Loss
Grand Slams
Australian Open A A A 3R A QF 2R 4R 2R 2R 1R 2R 0 / 8 13–8
French Open A A 4R SF QF 4R 2R 4R 1R F 4R 1R 0 / 10 29–10
Wimbledon A A A 2R 4R 2R 1R 3R 2R 2R 1R 1R 0 / 9 9–9
US Open A A A QF 2R 2R 4R 1R 2R 4R A A 0 / 7 13–7
Grand Slam SR 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 3 0 / 34 N/A
Annual Win-Loss 0–0 0–0 3–1 12–4 8–3 9–4 5–4 8–4 3–4 11–4 3–3 1–3 N/A 64–34
Year-End Championships
Tennis Masters Cup DNQ SF Did Not Qualify 0 / 1 2–2
Grand Slam Cup Was Not Invited 1R QF WNI SF Not Held 0 / 3 2–3
Masters Series
Indian Wells A A A A A 2R 1R 1R QF A 1R A 0 / 5 4–5
Miami A A A 3R A QF 3R QF 2R 2R 2R 1R 0 / 8 14–8
Monte Carlo A A A QF W 1R 3R 3R 2R 1R 2R 1R 0 / 9 14–8
Rome A A A 3R 3R 3R QF 1R 1R A 3R 1R 0 / 8 11–8
Hamburg A A A A W W 2R W 1R A 3R 1R 3 / 7 20–4
Canada A A A A A A A A A A A A 0 / 0 0–0
Cincinnati A A A 3R 1R 2R 2R 3R 2R A A A 0 / 6 7–6
Stuttgart A A 2R 1R 1R 2R A 2R A 1R A A 0 / 6 3–6
Paris A A 2R F 1R 2R A A A 2R A A 0 / 5 7–5
Masters Series SR 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 2 0 / 6 2 / 6 1 / 8 0 / 6 1 / 7 0 / 6 0 / 4 0 / 5 0 / 4 4 / 54 N/A
Annual Win-Loss 0–0 0–0 2–2 12–6 13–4 15–7 9–6 15–6 6–6 2–4 6–5 0–4 N/A 80–50
Year End Ranking
Ranking 1007 227 24 6 15 16 35 27 62 31 58 156 N/A

Top 10 winsEdit

Season 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 Total
Wins 1 6 2 2 2 2 1 3 2 1 22
# Player Rank Event Surface Round Score AMR
1992
1.   Stefan Edberg No. 2 Stuttgart, Germany Clay Quarterfinals 1–6, 6–4, 6–4 No. 100
1993
2.   Ivan Lendl No. 9 Barcelona, Spain Clay Quarterfinals 7–6(7–5), 6–2 No. 19
3.   Stefan Edberg No. 3 French Open, Paris, France Clay Quarterfinals 6–0, 6–7(3–7), 7–5, 6–4 No. 12
4.   Petr Korda No. 9 New Haven, United States Hard Final 7–5, 6–4 No. 12
5.   Richard Krajicek No. 9 US Open, New York, United States Hard 4th Round 6–4, 3–6, 6–1, 7–6(7–4) No. 8
6.   Jim Courier No. 2 ATP Finals, Frankfurt, Germany Carpet Round Robin 6–3, 1–6, 7–6(7–4) No. 6
7.   Michael Chang No. 7 ATP Finals, Frankfurt, Germany Carpet Round Robin 2–6, 6–4, 6–2 No. 6
1994
8.   Jim Courier No. 4 Monte Carlo, Monaco Clay Quarterfinals 6–7(5–7), 7–5, 7–6(7–3) No. 9
9.   Sergi Bruguera No. 4 Monte Carlo, Monaco Clay Final 7–5, 6–1, 6–3 No. 9
1995
10.   Pete Sampras No. 2 Hamburg, Germany Clay Semifinals 6–4, 2–6, 6–4 No. 20
11.   Goran Ivanišević No. 5 Hamburg, Germany Clay Final 6–3, 6–2, 6–1 No. 20
1996
12.   Yevgeny Kafelnikov No. 7 Antwerp, Belgium Carpet 1st Round 6–1, 6–3 No. 17
13.   Yevgeny Kafelnikov No. 7 Rome, Italy Clay 3rd Round 3–6, 6–3, 6–0 No. 40
1997
14.   Richard Krajicek No. 5 Hamburg, Germany Clay 2nd Round 6–1, 6–1 No. 38
15.   Yevgeny Kafelnikov No. 4 Hamburg, Germany Clay Semifinals 6–3, 6–1 No. 38
1998
16.   Karol Kučera No. 8 Ostrava, Czech Republic Carpet 2nd Round 6–4, 6–7(4–7), 6–4 No. 72
1999
17.   Pete Sampras No. 2 French Open, Paris, France Clay 2nd Round 7–5, 1–6, 6–4, 6–3 No. 100
18.   Gustavo Kuerten No. 8 French Open, Paris, France Clay Quarterfinals 7–5, 6–4, 6–4 No. 100
19.   Richard Krajicek No. 9 Grand Slam Cup, Munich, Germany Hard Quarterfinals 7–6(7–5), 6–4 No. 34
2000
20.   Tim Henman No. 10 Estoril, Portugal Clay Quarterfinals 6–2, 6–3 No. 34
21.   Yevgeny Kafelnikov No. 5 Stuttgart, Germany Clay 2nd Round 6–7(4–7), 7–5, 6–3 No. 48
2001
22.   Tommy Haas No. 10 St. Petersburg, Russia Hard 1st Round 3–6, 7–6(9–7), 6–4 No. 72

Main achievementsEdit

  • 1991 Won junior French Open, beating Thomas Enqvist in the final
  • 1992 Won the title in Stuttgart (Outdoor) with the strongest draw in the history of the event
  • 1993 Semifinalist at the French Open and Masters in Frankfurt
  • 1994 Won the titles in Monte Carlo and Hamburg (Super 9 events)
  • 1995 Won the title in Hamburg
  • 1997 Won the title in Hamburg title for the third time in four years
  • 1999 Reached the final of the French Open

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Sampras earns comeback success. The Independent (17 May 2000)
  2. ^ Finn, Robin (5 June 1999) Medvedev, a Finalist at the French Open, Can Feel the Love. New York Times.
  3. ^ String Quartet. Sportsillustrated.cnn.com (14 June 1999). Retrieved on 22 February 2014.
  4. ^ Past Results – Hopman Cup VII. Hopmancup.com (4 January 2014). Retrieved on 22 February 2014.

External linksEdit