Andreas Möller

Andreas Möller (born 2 September 1967) is a retired German international footballer who played as an attacking midfielder. He is currently the head of the youth department at Eintracht Frankfurt.

Andreas Möller
Andreas Möller.jpg
Möller in 2005
Personal information
Full name Andreas Möller
Date of birth (1967-09-02) 2 September 1967 (age 53)
Place of birth Frankfurt, West Germany
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)[1]
Position(s) Attacking midfielder
Club information
Current team
Eintracht Frankfurt (head of youth)
Youth career
1973–1981 BSC Schwarz-Weiß 1919 Frankfurt
1981–1985 Eintracht Frankfurt
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1985–1987 Eintracht Frankfurt 35 (5)
1988–1990 Borussia Dortmund 75 (24)
1990–1992 Eintracht Frankfurt 69 (28)
1992–1994 Juventus 56 (19)
1994–2000 Borussia Dortmund 153 (47)
2000–2003 Schalke 04 86 (6)
2003–2004 Eintracht Frankfurt 11 (0)
Total 485 (129)
National team
1988–1990 West Germany U-21 4 (2)
1988–1999 Germany 85 (29)
Teams managed
2007–2008 Viktoria Aschaffenburg
2015–2017 Hungary (assistant)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Club careerEdit

At club level, Möller played for Eintracht Frankfurt (1985–87, 1990–92, 2003–04), Borussia Dortmund (1988–90, 1994–2000), Juventus (1992–94), and Schalke 04 (2000–03).[2]

In his first spell with Borussia Dortmund, he won the DFB-Pokal during the 1988–89 season.[2] After moving to Italian side Juventus, he won the UEFA Cup in 1993, beating out his former club, Borussia Dortmund, 6–1 on aggregate, with Möller scoring one of the goals and providing three assists across both legs of the final.[3][4][5] Upon his return to Dortmund, he won several domestic titles with the club, including consecutive Bundesliga titles in 1995 and 1996,[2] as well as the Champions League in 1997, once again beating his former team, Juventus on this occasion, 3–1, and providing two assists during the match, while his corner also led to the opening goal;[6][7] he followed up the victory with the Intercontinental Cup later that year, after which he was named Man of the Match.[8] With Schalke, he won the DFB-Pokal twice more in 2001 and 2002.

International careerEdit

With the German national team, Möller was capped 85 times between 1988 and 1999, scoring 29 goals.[9] He took part at five major international tournaments, winning the 1990 World Cup and Euro 96.[2][10] He also played for his country at Euro 92, where his team reached the final, only to lose out 2–0 to Denmark (although Möller did not feature during the match),[11] as well as the 1994[12][13][14] and 1998 World Cups, in which Germany suffered quarter-final eliminations; in the former edition of the tournament, Germany were eliminated following a surprising 2–1 defeat to Bulgaria,[15] while in the latter edition, Germany lost out 3–0 to Croatia.[16] Möller did not play in the 1–0 victory over Argentina in the 1990 World Cup Final[17][18] and was also suspended for Germany's 2–1 golden goal victory over Czech Republic in the final of Euro 96[19] after he was booked in the semi-final against hosts England; in the resulting shoot out of the latter match, following a 1–1 draw after extra-time, Möller scored the winning penalty, which he celebrated by mimicking the bravado of the pose struck earlier in the shoot out when Paul Gascoigne had converted his penalty.[2][20][21][22]

Style of playEdit

Described by Stephan Uersfeld of ESPN FC as "one of the greatest midfielders of his generation,"[2] Möller was a talented, versatile, and complete advanced playmaker, who was known for his range of passing, creativity, vision, intelligence, and technical ability, as well as his agility, reactions, and his speed of thought and execution, which enabled him to play first–time passes; he also had the ability to carry the ball or run forward at defences while in possession. In addition to his creative capabilities and ability to provide assists to teammates, he was also known for his goalscoring, courtesy of his powerful and accurate striking ability with either foot, as well as his heading ability, which allowed him to excel in the air; his offensive qualities also allowed him to be deployed in more advanced roles, as a supporting striker or even as a winger on occasion, in addition to his usual central position as an attacking midfielder behind the strikers. He was also a free kick specialist.[3][12][13][14][23][24]

After retirementEdit

In June 2007, Möller started his career as football manager at Viktoria Aschaffenburg, playing in the Oberliga Hessen. From 2008 to 2011, he was athletic director for Kickers Offenbach.

On 20 October 2015 Möller was given a job for the Hungary national football team. Here he worked as an assistant for Bernd Storck. They played together for Borussia Dortmund when Dortmund won the West German Cup in the 1988–89 season.

On 5 October 2019, Möller returned to Eintracht Frankfurt and was hired as head of the youth department.[25]

MediaEdit

Möller features in EA Sports' FIFA video game series; he was on the cover of the German edition of FIFA 98.[26]

Career statisticsEdit

ClubEdit

[27]

Club performance League Cup League Cup Continental Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Germany League DFB-Pokal DFB Ligapokal Europe Total
1985–86 Eintracht Frankfurt Bundesliga 1 0
1986–87 22 1
1987–88 12 4
1987–88 Borussia Dortmund 14 3
1988–89 29 11
1989–90 32 10
1990–91 Eintracht Frankfurt 32 16
1991–92 37 12
Italy League Coppa Italia League Cup Europe Total
1992–93 Juventus Serie A 26 10
1993–94 30 9
Germany League DFB-Pokal DFB Ligapokal Europe Total
1994–95 Borussia Dortmund Bundesliga 30 14
1995–96 23 8
1996–97 26 5
1997–98 26 10
1998–99 30 7
1999–00 18 3
2000–01 Schalke 32 1
2001–02 32 4
2002–03 22 1
2003–04 Eintracht Frankfurt 11 0
Country Germany 429 110
Italy 56 19
Total 485 129

InternationalEdit

[9]

Germany national team
Year Apps Goals
1988 1 0
1989 6 2
1990 7 1
1991 5 1
1992 7 1
1993 10 7
1994 12 2
1995 9 5
1996 12 6
1997 4 0
1998 10 4
1999 2 0
Total 85 29

HonoursEdit

Borussia Dortmund
Juventus
Schalke 04
Germany
Individual

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Andreas Möller - Spielerprofil - DFB" (in German). dfb.de. Retrieved 4 December 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Uersfeld, Stephan (2 September 2017). "Germany, Dortmund great Andreas Moller on meeting Gazza after Euro 96". ESPN FC. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  3. ^ a b Stefano Bedeschi (4 September 2013). "Gli eroi in bianconero: Andreas MÖLLER" [The heroes in black and white: Andreas MÖLLER] (in Italian). Tutto Juve. Retrieved 18 September 2015.
  4. ^ "BVB VS JUVENTUS: A GAME STEEPED IN TRADITION". DFB. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  5. ^ Menicucci, Paolo (18 February 2017). "Roberto Baggio turns 50: five of his best UEFA goals". UEFA.com. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  6. ^ Milne, David (29 May 1997). "Football: Juventus wrecked by German bite". The Independent. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  7. ^ Hesse, Uli (24 February 2015). "Remembering the rich, crazy history of Borussia Dortmund versus Juventus". ESPN FC. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  8. ^ a b "Toyota Cup - Most Valuable Player of the Match Award". Archived from the original on 24 December 2008. Retrieved 25 January 2015.
  9. ^ a b Mühlen, Michael (4 December 2004). "Andreas Möller - Goals in International Matches". RSSSF. Retrieved 14 September 2012.
  10. ^ Faiers, Anthony (20 March 2012). "Borussia Dortmund: Top 10 All Time Club Legends". Bleacher Report. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  11. ^ "Gatecrashing Denmark down Germany". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 5 October 2003. Archived from the original on 14 June 2012. Retrieved 14 June 2012.
  12. ^ a b Mifflin, Lawrie (12 June 1994). "WORLD CUP '94: SCOREBOARD WATCHING; New Rules Plus New Players Should Equal Goals". The New York Times. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  13. ^ a b JONES, GRAHAME L. (12 June 1994). "World Cup '94 : WORLD CUP USA '94 – GROUP C PREVIEW : Coming to Its Own Defense : Germany Has Been at or Near the Top in the Last Five World Cups and That Isn't Expected to Change This Year". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  14. ^ a b Mike Zizzo (15 June 1994). "Baggio Takes Great Strides Toward Soccer Greatness". The Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved 24 September 2015.
  15. ^ Goff, Steven (11 July 1994). "BULGARIA IN SEMIS A COMPLETE SHOCK TO GERMANY". The Washington Post. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  16. ^ Wilson, Jonathan (21 March 2020). "Ranked! The 10 best players of France 98". FourFourTwo. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  17. ^ Chacoff, Alejandro (6 April 2016). "The fall: how diving became football's worst crime". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  18. ^ "A magical night in Rome". FIFA.com. 10 July 2014. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  19. ^ "Bierhoff hero of Germany's EURO '96 win". UEFA.com. 6 October 2003. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  20. ^ Lyttleton, Ben (27 June 2016). "England and penalties: 20 years of hurt that could continue against Iceland". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  21. ^ Smyth, Rob (6 June 2008). "The Joy of Six: European Championship memories". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  22. ^ "Euro 96 Archive - Germany 1-1 England". BBC Sport. 25 April 2011. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  23. ^ "MOLLER ANDREAS" (in Italian). tuttocalciatori.net. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  24. ^ Chiappini, Paolo (20 July 2015). "Gotze alla Juve nel segno della tradizione" (in Italian). TuttoCalciatori. Retrieved 17 June 2020.
  25. ^ Andreas Möller ist neuer Leiter des Nachwuchsleistungszentrums von Eintracht Frankfurt, eintracht.de, 5 October 2019
  26. ^ "FIFA 98: Road to World Cup". Retrieved 2 April 2015.
  27. ^ Andreas Möller at National-Football-Teams.com
  28. ^ "Deutscher Supercup, 1989, Finale". dfb.de. Retrieved 9 November 2020.
  29. ^ "Bundesliga Historie 1988/89" (in German). kicker.
  30. ^ "Bundesliga Historie 1989/90" (in German). kicker.
  31. ^ "Bundesliga Historie 1990/91" (in German). kicker.
  32. ^ "Bundesliga Historie 1991/92" (in German). kicker.
  33. ^ "Bundesliga Historie 1995/96" (in German). kicker.
  34. ^ "Bundesliga Historie 2000/01" (in German). kicker.
  35. ^ "1. Bundesliga: alle Topscorer der Saison 1989/90" (in German). kicker.de.
  36. ^ "1. Bundesliga: alle Topscorer der Saison 1995/96" (in German). kicker.de.
  37. ^ "Das Tor des Jahres 1991 - Andreas Müller" (in German). Sportschau. Retrieved 11 December 2018.

External linksEdit