In Greek mythology, Amythaon (/ˌæməˈθɒn/; Ancient Greek: Ἀμυθάων, gen.: Ἀμυθάονος) was a son of Cretheus and Tyro and brother of Aeson and Pheres.[1] He dwelt at Pylos in Messenia, and by Idomene, his niece, or by Aglaia became the father of Bias, Melampus, Aeolia[2] and Perimele.[3] His wife Idomene is sometimes said to be daughter of Abas, king of Argos.

MythologyEdit

According to Pindar, he and several other members of his family went to Iolcus to intercede with Pelias on behalf of Jason.[4] Pausanias mentions him among those to whom the restoration of the Olympic Games was ascribed.[5] A part of Elis was thought to have been named Amythaonia after him.[6]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Homer, Odyssey 11.255–260; Scholia on Homer, Odyssey 12.69 [= FGrHist 3 F104c]; see also Scholia on Euripides, Phoenician Women 150 [= FGrHist 4 F99].
  2. ^ Apollodorus, 1.9.11; Diodorus Siculus, 4.68.3.
  3. ^ Diodorus Siculus, 4.69.3.
  4. ^ Pindar, Pythian Ode 4.220
  5. ^ Pausanias, 5.8.2.
  6. ^ Stephanus of Byzantium, s.v. ᾽Αμυθαονία [= FGrHist 265 F11].

ReferencesEdit

  • Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. ISBN 0-674-99135-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History translated by Charles Henry Oldfather. Twelve volumes. Loeb Classical Library. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press; London: William Heinemann, Ltd. 1989. Vol. 3. Books 4.59–8. Online version at Bill Thayer's Web Site
  • Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotheca Historica. Vol 1-2. Immanel Bekker. Ludwig Dindorf. Friedrich Vogel. in aedibus B. G. Teubneri. Leipzig. 1888-1890. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Homer, The Odyssey with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, PH.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1919. ISBN 978-0674995611. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Pausanias, Description of Greece with an English Translation by W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., and H.A. Ormerod, M.A., in 4 Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1918. ISBN 0-674-99328-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library
  • Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio. 3 vols. Leipzig, Teubner. 1903. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Pindar, Odes translated by Diane Arnson Svarlien. 1990. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Pindar, The Odes of Pindar including the Principal Fragments with an Introduction and an English Translation by Sir John Sandys, Litt.D., FBA. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1937. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Stephanus of Byzantium, Stephani Byzantii Ethnicorum quae supersunt, edited by August Meineike (1790-1870), published 1849. A few entries from this important ancient handbook of place names have been translated by Brady Kiesling. Online version at the Topos Text Project.

  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, William, ed. (1870). "Amythaon". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.