Amphithea (Ancient Greek: Ἀμφιθέα) is the name of several women in Greek mythology:

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Apollodorus, 1.9.14, other accounts call Lycurgus' wife and Opheltes' mother Eurydice.
  2. ^ Apollodorus, 1.9.13
  3. ^ Servius on Virgil, Eclogues 8.29 – if indeed "Amphithea, daughter of Pronax" is the correct reading behind the actually surviving "*Iphitea, daughter of *Prognaus"
  4. ^ Homer, Odyssey 19.412; Tzetzes on Lycophron, 344
  5. ^ Plutarch, Parallela minora 28
  6. ^ Stephanus of Byzantium, s.v. Tenedos

ReferencesEdit

  • Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. ISBN 0-674-99135-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Homer, The Odyssey with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, PH.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1919. ISBN 978-0674995611. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus, Moralia with an English Translation by Frank Cole Babbitt. Cambridge, MA. Harvard University Press. London. William Heinemann Ltd. 1936. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Stephanus of Byzantium, Stephani Byzantii Ethnicorum quae supersunt, edited by August Meineike (1790–1870), published 1849. A few entries from this important ancient handbook of place names have been translated by Brady Kiesling. Online version at the Topos Text Project.