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Native American Pidgin English (AIPE) was an English-based pidgin spoken by Europeans and Native Americans in the United States. The main geographic regions AIPE was spoken in was British Columbia, Oregon, and Washington.

Native American Pidgin English
RegionUnited States
Native speakers
None
Language codes
ISO 639-3None (mis)
Glottologamer1255[1]

AIPE is mentioned in World Englishes as one of many factors influencing American English.

Native American Pidgin English is much more similar to English than many other English-based pidgins, and could be considered a mere ethnolect of American English.

The earliest variety of Pidgin English to appear in British North America is AIPE.[2] AIPE was used by both Europeans and the Native Americans in the contact situation and is therefore considered to be a true pidgin.[3] A pidgin language is made up of two languages sometimes spoken by only one group, but because AIPE was spoken by both groups some would say this makes it a true pidgin. The European people are the ones who taught the Native Americans how to speak English so they could develop AIPE together. This helped them communicate more efficiently.[4]

Native American Pidgin English’s phonology is characterized primarily by decreasing the English phonemic record, through definite exchanges and the loss of some phonemes, together with other distributed phenomena.[5]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Kirkpatrick, Andy. The Routledge Handbook of World Englishes. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2010. ISBN 978-0-203-84932-3 (page 56)
  • Dillard, Joey Lee. Toward a Social History of American English. Berlin, New York, Amsterdam: Mouton, 1985. ISBN 0-89925-046-7
  1. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "American Indian Pidgin English". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  2. ^ Gramley, Stephan (2018-10-08). The History of English. doi:10.4324/9780429460272. ISBN 9780429460272.
  3. ^ Leechman, Douglas; Hall, Robert A. (1955). "Native American Pidgin English: Attestations and Grammatical Peculiarities". American Speech. 30 (3): 163–171. doi:10.2307/453934. JSTOR 453934.
  4. ^ Leechman, Douglas; Hall, Robert A. (1955). "Native American Pidgin English: Attestations and Grammatical Peculiarities". American Speech. 30 (3): 163–171. doi:10.2307/453934. JSTOR 453934.
  5. ^ Leechman, Douglas; Hall, Robert A. (1955). "Native American Pidgin English: Attestations and Grammatical Peculiarities". American Speech. 30 (3): 163–171. doi:10.2307/453934. JSTOR 453934.
  • Englishes. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2010. ISBN 978-0-203-84932-3 (page 56)
  • Gramley. S. Varieties of American English. WS 2009‐2010. http://wwwhomes.uni-bielefeld.de/sgramley/VarAmE-01-Introduction.pdf
  • Jump up ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). American Indian Pidgin English. Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  • Leechman, Douglas, and Robert A. Hall. American Indian Pidgin English: Attestations and Grammatical Peculiarities. American Speech 30, no. 3 (1955): 163-71. doi:10.2307/453934.