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The Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance is an automotive charitable event held each year during the second weekend in March at The Ritz-Carlton Amelia Island in Amelia Island, Florida. A The New York Times article about celebrity car ownership listed "the nation's top concours d'elegance: Pebble Beach in California, Meadow Brook in Michigan, Amelia Island in Florida and the Louis Vuitton Classic in midtown Manhattan."[1]

A concours d'elegance (French, literally "a competition of elegance") is according to The New York Times writer Keith Martin like a "beauty pageant for rare and elegant cars".[2] Each entry is rated for authenticity, function, history, style and quality of restoration by a team of judges that includes specialists for each car type. A perfect score is 100, but any imperfection, no matter how slight, requires a fractional point deduction. Classes are arranged by type, marque, coachbuilder, country of origin, or time period.

Judges select first-, second-, and third-place finishers for each class in the event, and the judges confer the best of show award on one car from the group of first-place winners. In addition, a group of honorary judges—typically individuals who have made significant contributions to the automotive industry or motorsports—give subjective awards to recognize standout vehicles regardless of class ribbons, as well as memorial awards created to honor automotive industry personages.

HistoryEdit

Businessman and car collector Bill Warner, a photographer and writer for Road & Track magazine since 1971, founded the Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance in 1996 at the urging of other northeast Florida auto enthusiasts who wanted a classic car show in Florida like the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance in California. Warner selected Community Hospice of Northeast Florida, which had provided service to his parents as well as his wife, as the beneficiary of the event.[3] The first event was held April 6, 1996 at Ritz-Carlton Amelia Island. Warner assembled a group of 163 cars and attendance was around 2,200.

By 1999 attendance had increased to 8,500; 205 cars were exhibited; and $268,000 was raised for Community Hospice. The New York Times assigned a reporter to write a story. In his full-page feature article, Keith Martin stated, "The Amelia Island event, which is sponsored by Mercedes-Benz, is the only one in its region to aspire to the same standard of excellence (as the) Concours d'Elegance at Pebble Beach, in California, as well as the Louis Vuitton Classic at Rockefeller Center".[2]

EventsEdit

Each year's Amelia Island Concours honors an outstanding person from motorsports, a featured marque (manufacturer) and/or theme, plus judging and awards for each class of the Field of Dreams, the showcase exhibition. Events have included a golf tournament, automobile auctions, art and fashion shows, dinners with honored guests, silent auctions of memorabilia, charity raffles and autograph sessions.[4] The top concours awards are the Best of Show Concours d'Elegance and the Best of Show Concours de Sport. Additionally, there are various corporate awards, vehicle class awards, and special awards such as the People's Choice award.[5]

Entrants submit an application for each car, and the Concours field is selected from each year's pool of applicants. Vehicles newer than 1974 models are normally not eligible to enter, and vehicle participation is by invitation only.[6] Many collectors spend years and hundreds of thousands of dollars purchasing and restoring a car in hopes of being chosen. Once a car is accepted to the Concours, it cannot again be entered in the event for five years, with three exceptions; the ownership of the car has changed, the car has been restored, or if the featured marque is obscure, the Concours car selection committee can reach out to invite cars of varying restoration quality—or cars that have previously been entered in the Concours—in order to provide a healthy representation of the marque for exhibition.

Most of the owners display their cars because they want everyone who appreciates style and beauty to see their project. Most view the weekend as a social gathering rather than a special interest event. The organizers attempt to invite vehicles from varying time periods so that spectators who prefer a certain style of car will always find several examples to examine.[7] Many of the competing cars are valued in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, with some worth millions. For this reason, along with its setting and amenities, the Amelia Island Concours is considered one of the premier concours in the world.

Show summaries
Year Honoree Marque/theme Attendance Best in Show Concours d'Elegance Best in Show Concours de Sport
2019[8] Jacky Ickx Coachbuilt Volkswagens, Dragsters and Funny Cars, Porsche 962 race cars, Jaguar XK120s, Head of State Cars, Ferrari 250 GT SWB, and Cars of Rock Stars 1938 Mercedes-Benz 540K Autobahn-Kurier 1957 Ferrari 335 S
2018[9] Emerson Fittipaldi Cars of Martini Racing; Cars of ‘Big Daddy’ Ed Roth; the 50th anniversary of the Ferrari Daytona; IMSA Grand Touring Prototypes; Jaguar E-Type; the 70th anniversary of N.A.R.T; Pre-War MGs 1929 Duesenberg J/SJ convertible 1963 Ferrari 250/275P
2017[10] Al Unser Jr. Jaguar D-Type; Chevrolet Camaro, Mercedes-Benz Gullwings The Cars of the Movies 1935 Duesenberg SJ 582 1939 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900 Lungo Spider
2016[11] Hans-Joachim Stuck Trophy Cars 1930 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Town Car 1952 Pegaso Z-102 BS 2.5 Cupula Coupe
2015[12][13] Stirling Moss Stutz[14],Cars of the Cowboys, Speedsters, Orphan Concepts, Horseless Carriages, Forgotten Fiberglass 32,000[14] 1930 Cord L-29 Speedster 1932 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Zagato Spider
2014[15] Jochen Mass Offenhauser-powered cars; American Underslung; Selections from Zagato 29,000[16] 1937 Horch 853 1958 Scarab Mark II Sport Racer
2013[17] Sam Posey Porsche 911, Corvette Sting Ray, Ford GT40, Cars of Harry Miller, Ducati Motorcycles 25,000[18] 1936 Duesenberg SJN 1968 Ford GT40
2012[19] Vic Elford Ferrari GTO; Shelby Cobra; Custom Coachwork Cadillacs 23,000 1962 Ferrari 330 LM 1938 Bugatti Type 57
2011 Bobby Rahal Duesenberg; Allard; Kurtis[20] 15,000[21] 1933 Duesenberg SJN Arlington Torpedo Sedan 1935 Duesenberg SJ Speedster (Mormon Meteor)
2010[22] Richard Petty 40th anniversary of Porsche’s inaugural victory at the 24 Hours of Daytona & Le Mans; the last Cuban Grand Prix 18,000[23] 1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster 1960 Maserati Tipo 61
2009 David Hobbs Bohman & Schwartz 15,000 1931 Voisin C20 Demi-Berline 1923 Miller Special 122 Supercharged
2008 Parnelli Jones 100th Anniversary of GM, Model T, New York-to-Paris "Great Race" of 1908 20,000 1935 Duesenberg J Roadster 1957 Ferrari 335 Sport
2007 Derek Bell Discontinued road races: Mille Miglia,Targa Florio, Carrera Panamericana, Isle of Man TT motorcycle race 18,000 1937 Talbot-Lago T-150 CSS 1953 Ferrari 375 MM
2006 Johnny Rutherford Stanley Steamer 18,000 1931 DuPont Model H Sport Phaeton 1961 Ferrari 250 TRI/61
2005 Bobby Allison Alfa Romeo & 50th Anniversary
of Chevy small block V8
18,000 1931 Bugatti Type 51 1953 Porsche 550 Coupe
2004 Bobby Unser 100th Anniversary of Rolls Royce 18,000 1934 Voisin C-15 Award did not exist until 2005.
2003 Jim Hall 50th Anniversary of Corvette and
100th Anniversary of Buick
Rain 1958 Dual-Ghia Chrysler-powered
2002 Dan Gurney 100th Anniversary of Cadillac 14,000 1937 Delage D8 120SS Aerodynamic Coupe
2001 John Surtees 100th Anniversary of Pierce-Arrow 11,000 1937 Hispano Suiza Dubonnet
2000 Brian Redman Mercer 8,500 1938 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900
1999 Carroll Shelby 100th Anniversary of Packard 7,200 1938 Delage D8 120
1998 Hurley Haywood 50th Anniversary of Porsche 6,500 1932 Lincoln KB Dual Cowl Phaeton
1997 Phil Hill 50th Anniversary of Ferrari 3,500 1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster
1996 Sir Stirling Moss Mercedes-Benz 2,200 1938 Talbot-Lago 150SS Figoni & Falaschi

Charitable contributionsEdit

The non-profit Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance Foundation was formed in 2000 to organize and manage the workload of more than 300 volunteers.[24] The proceeds of the Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance have helped support Community Hospice of Northeast Florida with total contributions of over $1.5 million through 2008. The event's goal is to raise at least $100,000 for Community Hospice each year. Other charities receiving funding include The Spina Bifida Association of Florida at Jacksonville, Shop with Cops, Duval County 4-H Foundation and the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society. The concours' foundation has donated over $3.5 million since 1996 to these charitable organizations.[25]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Martin, Keith (February 25, 2000). "Collecting; It's The Stars' Cars That Steal the Scene". Autos on Friday. The New York Times.
  2. ^ a b Martin, Keith (May 19, 1999). "Where Old Cars Go to Gleam". The New York Times. Retrieved March 4, 2009.
  3. ^ Scanlan, Dan (March 9, 2003). "Full Force". The Florida Times-Union. Jacksonville.
  4. ^ Kozak, Graham (March 7, 2019). "Throttle-Back Thursday: Rain couldn't stop the inaugural Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance". Autoweek. Crain Communications, Inc. Retrieved August 25, 2019.
  5. ^ "2019 Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance Media Report". Amelia Island Concours d'elegance. March 12, 2019. Retrieved August 25, 2019.
  6. ^ "Entrant Information". Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance. Retrieved August 25, 2019.
  7. ^ Medford, Brian (2011). "Report: 2011 Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance". AutoTrader Classics.
  8. ^ Lentinello, Richard (August 2019). "Amelia Island Concours". Hemmings Classic Car. Bennington, Vermont: Hemmings Motor News. pp. 42–47.
  9. ^ Bomstead, Carl (June 2017). "Timing the Weather at Amelia Island". Sports Car Market. 30 (6): 68.
  10. ^ Bomstead, Carl (June 2017). "Dodging the Storm and Basking in the Sun". Sports Car Market. 29 (6): 58.
  11. ^ Lentinello, Richard (July 2019). "Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance". Hemmings Classic Car. Bennington, Vermont: Hemmings Motor News. pp. 46–50.
  12. ^ "The Best One Yet". Autoweek. 65 (7): 12. April 13, 2015.
  13. ^ Lentinello, Richard (July 2015). "Amelia Island Concours". Hemmings Classic Car. Bennington, Vermont: Hemmings Motor News. pp. 38–43.
  14. ^ a b Bomstead, Carl (June 2015). "Twenty Years Old and Still Gaining Speed". Sports Car Market. 27 (6): 52–54.
  15. ^ Bomstead, Carl (June 2014). "Sunshine and Surprises on Sunday". Sports Car Market. 26 (6): 60.
  16. ^ "Amelia Island Concours 2014 - Report and Photos". Sports Car Digest. Off Camber Group, Inc. Retrieved August 24, 2019.
  17. ^ Lentinello, Richard (September 2013). "Amelia Island Concours". Hemmings Classic Car. Bennington, Vermont: Hemmings Motor News. pp. 38–39.
  18. ^ "Amelia Island Concours 2013 - Report and Photos". Sports Car Digest. Off Camber Group, Inc. Retrieved August 24, 2019.
  19. ^ "Amelia Island Concours 2013 - Photo Gallery". Sports Car Digest. Off Camber Group, Inc. Retrieved August 25, 2019.
  20. ^ DeLorenzo, Matt (June 2011). "Road Ahead: Amelia On My Mind". Road & Track. 10. 62: 9.
  21. ^ "Amelia Island Concours 2011 - Photo Gallery". Sports Car Digest. Off Camber Group, Inc. Retrieved August 24, 2019.
  22. ^ "2010 Amelia Island Concours Photo Gallery". Sports Car Digest. Off Camber Group, Inc. Retrieved August 25, 2019.
  23. ^ Scanlan, Dan (March 15, 2010). "Record Numbers for Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance". The Florida Times-Union. Jacksonville.
  24. ^ Scanlan, Dan (July 28, 2000). "Non-Profit to Run Concours d'Elegance". The Florida Times-Union. Jacksonville.
  25. ^ "About the Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance". Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance. August 22, 2019. Retrieved August 25, 2019.

External linksEdit