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Alpine skiing at the 2018 Winter Olympics – Women's super-G

The women's super-G competition of the PyeongChang 2018 Olympics was held on 17 February 2018 at the Jeongseon Alpine Centre in PyeongChang.[1][2]

Women's super-G
at the XXIII Olympic Winter Games
Alpine skiing pictogram.svg
VenueJeongseon Alpine Centre, Gangwon Province, South Korea
Date17 February
Competitors44 from 23 nations
Winning time1.21.11
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s) Ester Ledecká  Czech Republic
2nd, silver medalist(s) Anna Veith  Austria
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Tina Weirather  Liechtenstein
← 2014
2022 →

QualificationEdit

A total of up to 320 alpine skiers qualified across all eleven events. Athletes qualified for this event by having met the A qualification standard only, which meant having 80 or less FIS Points and being ranked in the top 500 in the Olympic FIS points list. The Points list takes into average the best results of athletes per discipline during the qualification period (1 July 2016 to 21 January 2018). Countries received additional quotas by having athletes ranked in the top 30 of the 2017–18 FIS Alpine Ski World Cup (two per gender maximum, overall across all events). After the distribution of B standard quotas (to nations competing only in the slalom and giant slalom events), the remaining quotas were distributed using the Olympic FIS Points list, with each athlete only counting once for qualification purposes. A country could only enter a maximum of four athletes for the event.[3]

SummaryEdit

Ester Ledecká became the Olympic champion, her first Olympic medal and the first gold medal in alpine skiing for the Czech Republic. The defending champion Anna Veith (competing as Fenninger in 2014) was second, and Tina Weirather was third, the first Olympic medal for Liechtenstein since 1988. The results were extraordinarily dense, with 0.01 seconds separating gold and silver medals, as well as bronze medal from the fourth place (Lara Gut). Ledecká's victory was completely unexpected as she had been much better known for her snowboarding achievements.

Lindsey Vonn, starting first, was leading until her time was improved by Johanna Schnarf, then Lara Gut. Weirather, skiing seventh, improved Gut's time by 0.01 seconds, pushing Vonn, 0.26 seconds behind, off the podium. Starting 15th, Veith took the lead, with the main competitors either not finishing or posting inferior times, so that she believed her first place was assured, and NBC even announced her as a champion. However, the surprising champion was Ledecká who started 26th and improved Veith's time by 0.01. Ledecká's relative lack of experience in the super-G event might have led to her victory, as she took a more aggressive line that other, more experienced skiers shied away from. After the finish, Ledecká did not believe she won and thought that somebody else's time was shown by mistake.[4][5]

ResultsEdit

The race was started at 12:00.[6]

Rank Bib Name Country Time Behind
  26 Ester Ledecká   Czech Republic 1:21.11
  15 Anna Veith   Austria 1:21.12 +0.01
  7 Tina Weirather   Liechtenstein 1:21.22 +0.11
4 5 Lara Gut   Switzerland 1:21.23 +0.12
5 3 Johanna Schnarf   Italy 1:21.27 +0.16
6 11 Federica Brignone   Italy 1:21.49 +0.38
1 Lindsey Vonn   United States
8 19 Cornelia Hütter   Austria 1:21.54 +0.43
9 16 Michelle Gisin   Switzerland 1:21.57 +0.46
10 14 Viktoria Rebensburg   Germany 1:21.62 +0.51
11 13 Sofia Goggia   Italy 1:21.65 +0.54
12 4 Nadia Fanchini   Italy 1:21.88 +0.77
13 17 Ragnhild Mowinckel   Norway 1:22.00 +0.89
14 28 Breezy Johnson   United States 1:22.14 +1.03
15 12 Laurenne Ross   United States 1:22.17 +1.06
16 27 Alice McKennis   United States 1:22.20 +1.09
17 6 Corinne Suter   Switzerland 1:22.24 +1.13
18 9 Nicole Schmidhofer   Austria 1:22.30 +1.19
19 20 Romane Miradoli   France 1:22.36 +1.25
20 22 Jennifer Piot   France 1:22.38 +1.27
21 18 Tamara Tippler   Austria 1:22.50 +1.39
22 10 Tiffany Gauthier   France 1:22.56 +1.45
23 23 Valérie Grenier   Canada 1:22.77 +1.66
24 25 Lisa Hörnblad   Sweden 1:22.79 +1.68
25 30 Maruša Ferk   Slovenia 1:23.18 +2.07
26 33 Maryna Gąsienica-Daniel   Poland 1:23.21 +2.10
27 8 Jasmine Flury   Switzerland 1:23.30 +2.19
28 2 Tessa Worley   France 1:23.54 +2.43
29 24 Candace Crawford   Canada 1:23.69 +2.58
30 32 Alexandra Coletti   Monaco 1:24.01 +2.90
31 35 Greta Small   Australia 1:24.09 +2.98
32 31 Petra Vlhová   Slovakia 1:24.26 +3.15
33 36 Kateřina Pauláthová   Czech Republic 1:24.48 +3.37
34 38 Tina Robnik   Slovenia 1:24.49 +3.38
35 34 Barbara Kantorová   Slovakia 1:25.30 +4.19
36 43 Ania Monica Caill   Romania 1:25.74 +4.63
37 29 Roni Remme   Canada 1:25.90 +4.79
38 41 Sabrina Simader   Kenya 1:26.25 +5.14
39 37 Noelle Barahona   Chile 1:27.16 +6.05
40 40 Kim Vanreusel   Belgium 1:27.60 +6.49
41 39 Sarah Schleper   Mexico 1:27.93 +6.82
42 42 Elvedina Muzaferija   Bosnia and Herzegovina 1:27.97 +6.86
43 45 Olha Knysh   Ukraine 1:30.60 +9.49
21 Kira Weidle   Germany DNF
44 Maria Shkanova   Belarus DNS

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Venues". www.pyeongchang2018.com/. Pyeongchang 2018 Olympic Organizing Committee for the 2018 Winter Olympics. Retrieved 26 December 2017.
  2. ^ Start list
  3. ^ "Qualification Systems for XXII Olympic Winter Games, PyeongChang 2018 Alpine skiing" (PDF). International Ski Federation (FIS). 16 August 2017. Retrieved 20 January 2018.
  4. ^ Graham, Bryan Armen (17 February 2018). "Super-G: snowboarder Ledecka wins shock gold on borrowed skis with Vonn sixth". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  5. ^ Mulvenney, Nick (17 November 2018). "Czech snowboarder Ledecka stuns Alpine world with super-G gold". Reuters. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  6. ^ Final results