Alpes Maritimae

Alpes Maritimae (Latin pronunciation: [ˈaɫpeːs maˈrɪtɪmae̯]) were a small province of the Roman Empire founded in 63 AD by Nero. It was one of the three provinces straddling the Alps between modern France and Italy, along with Alpes Graiae et Poeninae and Alpes Cottiae. The Alpes Maritimae included parts of the present-day French departments of Alpes-Maritimes, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence and Hautes-Alpes.[1]

Province of Alpes Maritimae
Provincia Alpes Maritimæ
Province of the Roman Empire
63 AD–476
Roman Empire - Alpes Maritimae (125 AD).svg
The Roman Empire c. 125 AD, with the province of Alpes Maritimae highlighted.
CapitalCemenelum (63 AD – 297 AD)
Ebrodunum (from 297 AD)
Historical eraAntiquity
• Established by Nero
63 AD
• Disestablished
476
Succeeded by
Kingdom of Italy (476-493)
Today part of France

HistoryEdit

Following the subjugation of the local Ligurian tribes in the summer of 14 BC, the region was ruled by a praefectus civitatium, then was given Latin Rights in 63 AD and administered by a procurator. Cemenelum (modern Cimiez, a neighbourhood of Nice), the chief town of the Vediantii, became the capital of the new province..[2]

Under Diocletian (284–305), the province was extended after it was given parts of the Narbonensis and Alpes Cottiae, and allocated to the praefectura Galliarum (Diocese of Vienne). The capital was transferred to Eburodunum (modern Embrun), which was initially part of the Alpes Cottiae.[2]

SettlementsEdit

Major settlements within the province included:

After 297 the province was expanded to include:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Michael Grant, Gli imperatori romani, Roma, Newton & Compton, 1984, ISBN 88-7819-224-4.
  2. ^ a b Graßl 2006.

BibliographyEdit

  • Graßl, Herbert (2006). "Alpes Maritimae". Brill’s New Pauly. doi:10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e116390.
  • Morabito, Stéphane (2010). "Entre Narbonnaise et Italie : le territoire de la province des Alpes Maritimae pendant l'Antiquité romaine (I er S. av. J.-C.-V e S. apr. J.-C.)". Gallia. 67 (2): 99–124. ISSN 0016-4119. JSTOR 43608132.

Coordinates: 44°34′21″N 6°29′37″E / 44.5724°N 6.4936°E / 44.5724; 6.4936