Allen High School (Texas)

Allen High School is a public, co-educational secondary school in Allen, Texas (United States). It is the only high school in the Allen Independent School District.

Allen High School
Address
Map
300 Rivercrest Boulevard

, ,
75002

Information
TypePublic, co-educational high school
MottoHome of the Allen Eagles
Established1910
School districtAllen Independent School District
NCES District ID4807890[1]
SuperintendentRobin Bullock[2]
NCES School ID480789000117[1]
PrincipalMatt Russell[3]
Faculty277.75 (FTE)[1]
Grades9–12[1]
Enrollment5,317 (2022–23)[1]
Student to teacher ratio19.14[1]
Campus size177 acres (720,000 m2)
Color(s)Navy, White, Red      
Fight songAcross the Field
AthleticsUIL Class 6A
MascotAmerican Bald Eagle
WebsiteAllen High School

Allen High School serves most of the city of Allen. Until fall 2006, when Lovejoy High School opened, Allen High School served high school students in the Lovejoy Independent School District, which includes the city of Lucas, most of Fairview, and a small portion of Plano.[4]

History edit

The first Allen High School, built in 1910 at the corner of Belmont and Cedar, was a two-story brick building housing six classrooms and an auditorium, and saw the first graduating class of eight students in 1914.

The second Allen High School was established in 1959 on land donated by Mr. Harris Brown on the corner of Jupiter and Main Streets.[5]

August 1999 saw the opening of Allen High School "2000," a new facility (at the corner of Greenville and Rivercrest) which opened to 2,200 students in grades 10 through 12. The former high school was converted into the Becky Lowery Freshman Center, named in honor of a former middle school teacher and school counselor. In 2018, the building was partly demolished and replaced with a new building on an adjacent plot of land on Greenville Ave. The southernmost part of the school was renovated into the Dillard Special Achievement Center, while the northern section became a parking lot. The football stadium still stands. The new building started serving grade 9 students during the 2018–19 school year, and had an enrollment of 1,634 in 2015–16.[6] The final expansion of the school was completed in 2011.[clarification needed] The expansion included a new 1,500 seat performing arts center, an expansion of band hall space and a Career and Technology Education center featuring a student-managed restaurant open to the public, a student-managed apparel store with student-designed items, multiple new Mac labs, Mac-equipped rooms for the photojournalism, yearbook, commercial photography, audiovisual, radio, and newspaper classes as well as learning-classrooms for the medical education programs.

Location edit

  • Freshman Center (9): 368 N Greenville Ave, Allen, TX 75002
  • Main campus (10–12): 300 Rivercrest Blvd. Allen, TX 75002

Academics edit

 
Allen High School was designated a Blue Ribbon School during the 2001–02 school year.

Allen High School offers the International Baccalaureate program to its students, with the class of 2002 being the first to graduate Full Diploma. AHS also provides Advanced Placement, Dual Credit, and elective courses. AP course enrollment at AHS is 53%.[7]

Allen uses an 8:45 a.m. to 4:05 p.m. modified block schedule. The period schedule includes five standard periods per day, though students are required to be present for only four in 10th grade, and only three in 11th or 12th grade.

Allen High School was named a 2001–02 National Blue Ribbon School[8] and a 2004 TEA Pathfinder School.[citation needed]

Extracurricular activities edit

Athletics edit

As of 2021 Allen High has the largest University Interscholastic League (UIL) athletic program of any Texas high school.[9]

Programs include:

Football edit

For over twenty years, the Allen Eagles football team has been one of the top high school football programs in Texas, qualifying for post season play in every season from 1999 to 2023. During this time, the team has won five state championships (2008, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2017), appeared in ten final fours (2003, 2006, 2008, 2012-2018), won 16 district titles in a row (2006-2021), and achieved a won-loss record of 234-28 in the 19 seasons from 2004 through 2022.[10] Thirteen players from Allen have made their way to play professionally in the NFL.[11]

Football stadium edit

 
Eagle Stadium in 2012

Due to the program's popularity and student population, the school was authorized, via an approved April 2009 referendum, to build an 18,000-seat stadium for the team. The stadium cost nearly $60 million, and opened for the 2012 football season.[12][13] It is the fifth largest high school stadium in the state, but the largest designed for the use of only one team. The facility houses a weight room, wrestling practice facility, and indoor golfing facility.[14]

Basketball edit

  • Boys
    • 2018 6A state champions[15]
    • 2014 5A state semi-finalist[16]
  • Girls
    • 2019 6A state semi-finalist[17]

Girls golf edit

Wrestling edit

  • State champions[21]
    • Boys team (13): 2009-2010, 2010-2011, 2011–2012, 2012-2013 5A, 2013-2014 5A, 2014-2015 6A, 2015-2016 6A, 2016-2017 6A, 2017-2018 6A, 2018-2019 6A, 2019-2020 6A, 2020-2021 6A, 2021-2022 6A
    • Boys individual (49): 2006-2007 (1), 2008-2009 (1), 2009-2010 (2), 2010-2011 (3), 2011-2012 (4), 2012-2013 5A (6), 2013-2014 5A (1), 2014-2015 6A (2), 2015-2016 6A (4), 2016-2017 6A (5), 2017-2018 6A (6), 2018-2019 6A (5), 2019-2020 6A (3), 2020-2021 6A (3), 2021-2022 6A (3)
    • Girls team (2): 2020-2021 6A, 2021-2022 6A
    • Girls individual (7): 2012-2013 5A (1), 2014-2015 6A (1), 2015-2016 6A (1), 2016-2017 6A (1), 2017-2018 6A (1), 2020-2021 6A (2)

Bowling edit

    • Girls team (3): 2004, 2005, 2009
    • Girls individual (2): 2005, 2021
    • Boys team (3): 2002, 2008, 2015
  • State finalists[22][23]
    • Girls team (1): 2010
    • Girls individual (1): 2004
    • Boys team (2): 2003, 2013

Hockey edit

Soccer edit

  • Boys

Other sports edit

Band edit

The Allen Escadrille claims to be the country's largest high school marching band, with a membership of over 800 students. They perform at pre-game and halftime of all Allen varsity football games, participate in Texas UIL competitions, and perform in parades and at other venues. The band was invited to perform in the St. Patrick's Day Parade in Honolulu, Hawaii, in 2009, and performed in the 2006 and 2016 Rose Parades in Pasadena, California. The band received the Sudler Shield Award from the John Philip Sousa Foundation in 2004.[citation needed] The band won the 4A State Marching Band Competition two years in a row, 1987 and 1988.[citation needed]

Notable performances:

Other programs edit

  • 2011 - 1st place in Culinary at the Texas ProStart Competition in Austin, TX.[30] 17th place at the National ProStart Competition.[citation needed]
  • 2011 – Named a Grammy Signature Gold School,[31] recognizing Allen as a U.S. public high school making an outstanding commitment to music education during an academic school year.
  • 2011–2012 - Chorale Choir was invited to perform at the Texas Music Educators Association's annual convention. A recording of their performance was published om Spotify in 2012.[32] The TMEA event invites by audition only the top 5 schools in the state.[citation needed]
  • Orchestra - The orchestra was invited to perform at The International Midwest Clinic and Convention in 2006.[33]
  • Photography - Association of Texas Photography Instructors (ATPI) Top Program Contests
    • 2002 – 3rd place Photojournalism/Sports[34]
    • 2003 – 2nd place Architecture[35]
    • 2004 – 2nd place Architecture, Honorable Mention Sports[36]
    • 2005 – 3rd place Landscape/Nature, Honorable Mention Sports and Architecture[37]
    • 2006 – 1st place Top Award; 1st place in Architecture, Landscape, and Thematic categories, and 2nd place in portrait[38]
    • 2007 – 5th Place Top Award; 1st place Thematic, 3rd place portrait, and Honorable Mention in Architecture and Landscape/Nature[39]
    • 2008 – 2nd Place Architecture, 3rd Place Portrait, Honorable Mention Landscape/Nature[40]
    • 2009 – 2nd Place Top Award; 1st Place Documentary/Photojournalism, 2nd Place Architecture, Portrait, and Thematic[41]
    • 2010 – 1st Place Top Award (tie); 1st Place Landscape/Nature and Portrait, 2nd Place Documentary/Photojournalism and Still Life[42]
    • 2011 – 2nd Place Top Award; 1st Place Portrait and Thematic, 3rd Place Still Life[43]
    • 2012 – 3rd Place Top Award; 1st Place Landscape/Nature, 2nd Place Still Life, 3rd Place Architecture, Honorable Mention Portrait[44]
    • 2013 – 2nd Place Top Award; 1st Place Architecture and Thematic, 2nd Place Landscape/Nature and Portrait[45]
    • 2014 – 3rd Place Top Award; 1st Place Portrait, 3rd Place Architecture and Landscape/Nature, Honorable Mention Thematic[46]
    • 2016 – 2nd Place Top Award; 1st Place Portrait, 2nd Place Still Life, 3rd Place Architecture and Landscape/Nature[47]
    • 2017 – 3rd Place Top Award; 1st Place Still Life and Thematic, 3rd Place Architecture[48]
    • 2018 – 2nd Place Commercial/Advertising, Honorable Mention Architecture and Portrait[49]
    • 2019 – 3rd Place Top Award; 1st Place Commercial/Advertising, 2nd Place Thematic, 3rd Place Portrait[50]
    • 2020 – 2nd Place Portrait and Thematic, 3rd Place Landscape/Nature[51]
    • 2021 – 1st Place Landscape/Nature, 2nd Place Architecture[52]
    • 2022 – 1st Place Architecture, 2nd Place Commercial/Advertising[53]
  • Rugby - 2011 Division 2 state runner-up at the Championship in Houston, Texas.[citation needed]
  • UIL Academics Team
    • 2022 6A state runner up[54]
    • 2023 6A state champions[55]

Notable alumni edit

References edit

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  2. ^ "Superintendent of Schools". Allen Independent School District. Archived from the original on 5 November 2021. Retrieved 5 November 2021.
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  4. ^ "Dallas Morning News: Collin County districts learning as they grow". Archived from the original on 2006-08-20. Retrieved 2006-09-02.
  5. ^ "Allen High School web page". Archived from the original on 2013-12-24. Retrieved 2013-12-23.
  6. ^ "LOWERY FRESHMAN CENTER". National Center for Education Statistics. Archived from the original on May 29, 2018. Retrieved May 5, 2018.
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External links edit


33°06′33″N 96°39′39″W / 33.109223°N 96.660819°W / 33.109223; -96.660819