Alice Eyton (1874 – November 3, 1929), sometimes credited under her married name Alice von Saxmar, was a New Zealand–born journalist, screenwriter, playwright, and novelist active in Hollywood between 1918 and 1922.

Alice Eyton
Born
Alice Rose Eyton

1874
Hokitika, New Zealand
DiedNovember 3, 1929
Pasadena, California, USA
Cause of deathThird-degree burns
OccupationScreenwriter, novelist, playwright
Spouse(s)Robert von Saxmar
RelativesCharles Eyton (brother)
Kathlyn Williams (sister-in-law)
Vera Doria (sister)

BiographyEdit

OriginsEdit

Eyton was born in New Zealand, to Robert Eyton and Eleanor Fosbury. Her father died when she was young. Her brother, Charles Eyton, became a prominent actor and producer in Hollywood.

By 1900, Eyton had already had a number of short stories published in New Zealand and Australia, under such titles as 'Behind the hills',[1] 'Queen Empress and the cotter's wife',[2] 'Down by the sea wall',[3] 'Woman in the clutches of the law: At the gaols',[4] and 'The girl he left behind him: An incident of the Transvaal war'.[5]

In January 1901, along with many of the Sydney Bohemian set such as sculptor Nelson Illingworth, writer Louise Mack, and poet Banjo Paterson, she attended the farewell dinner of Scottish-Australian poet and bush balladeer Will H. Ogilvie (1869–1963).[6] Following her own testimonial dinner, in February 1902, Eyton travelled to London on board P&O's RMS Arcadia.[7][8]

Hollywood careerEdit

She moved to Hollywood, California, by 1905, where she continued her literary efforts.[9] By April 1909, Eyton's first play, based on Victor Cherbuliez's 1877 novel Samuel Brohl et cie, was accepted for production in New York City.[10][11]

She married fellow writer Robert von Saxmar around 1920 in Los Angeles, where she found work as a stenographer at Paramount. After working her way up the ranks,[12][13] she earned a spot on the studio's writing staff; her first known credit was on 1918's A Girl Named Mary. She wrote over a dozen scripts in the ensuing five years. By June 1921 she was listed as a writer for the Realart company.[14]

DeathEdit

Eyton died of burns sustained when her Halloween costume caught fire at a party being held in Pasadena, California.[15] The party was being held in a cabin in Arroyo Seco, where she was temporarily residing while working on a novel; a lit match or cigarette somehow landed on Eyton's cotton snow maiden costume, which quickly went up in flames.[15] She was rushed to the nearby Pasadena Hospital, but her burns were fatal.[15]

Selected filmographyEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Behind the Hills". The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser. LXIII (1918). New South Wales, Australia. April 10, 1897. p. 791. Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  2. ^ "Queen Empress and the Cotter's Wife". The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser. LXIII (1928). New South Wales, Australia. June 19, 1897. p. 1311. Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ "Down by the Sea Wall". The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser. LXV (1967). New South Wales, Australia. March 19, 1898. p. 606. Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  4. ^ "Woman in the Clutches of the Law". The Sunday Times (771). New South Wales, Australia. October 28, 1900. p. 10. Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  5. ^ "The girl he left behind him". Delegate Argus And Border Post. 5 (268). New South Wales, Australia. December 22, 1900. p. 1 (Christmas Supplement to the Delegate Argus.). Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ "Bohemia up to date". Freeman's Journal. LII (3239). New South Wales, Australia. February 2, 1901. p. 11. Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "Personal". The Sunday Times (840). New South Wales, Australia. February 23, 1902. p. 7. Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ "Departure of the R. M. S. Arcadia". The Australian Star (4372). New South Wales, Australia. February 19, 1902. p. 3. Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  9. ^ "11 Mar 1909, 19 - The Los Angeles Times at Newspapers.com". Retrieved February 15, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Personal". The Sunday Times (1214). New South Wales, Australia. April 25, 1909. p. 3. Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  11. ^ "Australians' success abroad". The Referee (1184). New South Wales, Australia. July 14, 1909. p. 16. Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "23 Jan 1920, Page 4 - The Tennessean at Newspapers.com". Retrieved February 15, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "17 Apr 1919, 5 - The Tampa Times at Newspapers.com". Retrieved February 15, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Six writers now with Realart". Table Talk (1871). Victoria, Australia. June 9, 1921. p. 42. Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  15. ^ a b c "4 Nov 1929, Page 18 - The Cincinnati Enquirer at Newspapers.com". Retrieved February 15, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "The silver screen". South Western Times. VII (43). Western Australia. April 12, 1924. p. 2. Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  17. ^ "Film Flashes". National Advocate. New South Wales, Australia. July 27, 1922. p. 1. Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  18. ^ "His Majesty's". The World. II (254). Tasmania, Australia. October 25, 1919. p. 8. Retrieved February 24, 2019 – via National Library of Australia.