Ali Mohammad Besharati

Ali Mohammad Besharati (born 1945) is a senior Iranian politician who served as deputy foreign minister and also, interior minister.

Ali Mohammad Besharati
Minister of Interior
In office
16 August 1993 – 20 August 1997
Preceded byAbdollah Nouri
Succeeded byAbdollah Nouri
Personal details
Born1945 (age 75–76)
Jahrom
NationalityIranian

Early life and educationEdit

Besharati was born in Jahrom in 1945.[1][2] He studied medicine. However, he holds a bachelor's degree in education.[1] During the reign of Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, when he was a medical student, he was detained and jailed for five years.[3]

CareerEdit

Following the 1979 revolution, Besharati became a member of the Iranian Parliament. He was very powerful official in the foreign ministry as deputy minister for ten years.[3][4] He was deputy to Ali Akbar Velayati.[5] He also served as an advisor to former President Ayatollah Hashemi Rafsanjani.[6]

Besharati served as interior minister from 1993 to 1997.[3][7] Besharati succeeded Abdollah Nouri as interior minister.[8][9] Besharati's major task was to organize the election process. It was he who appointed Mahmoud Ahmedinejad as governor.[3]

Then he worked in the Strategic Studies Center.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Jamal S. Al-Suwaidi (2002). Iran and the Gulf: A Search for Stability. I.B.Tauris. p. 60. ISBN 978-1-86064-144-2.
  2. ^ a b "Ali Muhammad Besharati". Utah University Archives. 12 May 2007. Archived from the original on 21 February 2014. Retrieved 28 August 2013.
  3. ^ a b c d Michael Slackman (28 August 2006). "An Ex-Official Offers Glimpse of Iranian Views of U.S." The New York Times. Retrieved 11 February 2013.
  4. ^ Dilip Hiro (1987). Iran Under the Ayatollahs. Routledge & Kegan Paul. p. 382. ISBN 978-0-7102-1123-1.
  5. ^ Farhang Rajaee (2010). Islamism and Modernism. University of Texas Press. p. 162. ISBN 978-0-292-77436-0.
  6. ^ Hanif Zarrabi-Kashani (18 July 2013). "Iran: The Week in Review". United States Institute of Peace. Retrieved 28 August 2013.
  7. ^ Peter Feuilherade (1 April 1994). "Iran: media and the message". The Middle East. Retrieved 19 June 2013.
  8. ^ Mohammad Sahimi (28 April 2010). "The Middle Road of Hashemi Rafsanjani". PBS. Retrieved 11 February 2013.
  9. ^ Rachel Ingber (14 August 1997). "Khatami's Cabinet Choices: On the Record" (PolicyWatch 264). Retrieved 28 August 2013.

External linksEdit