Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas

  (Redirected from Alberta Pandas)

The Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas are the sports teams that represent the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Alberta athletics teams have won a total of 93 national championships, including 79 U Sports sanctioned sports, making it one of the most successful programs in the country.[3]

Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas
Logo
UniversityUniversity of Alberta
AssociationU SPORTS
ConferenceCanada West
Athletic directorIan Reade
LocationEdmonton, Alberta
Varsity teams24[1]
Football stadiumFoote Field
ArenaClare Drake Arena
Other arenasUniversiade Pavilion
GymnasiumSaville Community Sports Centre
MascotGUBA (Great University Bear of Alberta)
NicknameGolden Bears
Pandas
Fight song"Alberta Cheer Song"
ColorsGreen and gold[2]
   
Websitebearsandpandas.ca/index.aspx

HistoryEdit

The University of Alberta has featured varsity teams since the school's inception in 1908, notably with the men's ice hockey team first playing a season of six games during that school year.[3] The school's colours of evergreen and gold were approved as the varsity teams' official colours on October 13, 1908.[3] The football team adopted the name "Golden Bears" for the 1935 season with the men's basketball team following suit in 1936 and all other male varsity programs soon after.[3] After World War II ended and teams resumed play, the women's varsity teams first began playing under the "Pandas" moniker which was adopted by all of the school's women's teams.[3]

Currently, Alberta's athletics program fields 24 teams in 14 different sports administered by U Sports in the Canada West conference.[1] The football and soccer teams play their home games at Foote Field, and the basketball and volleyball teams' home is the Saville Community Sports Centre.[4][5] The ice hockey teams play at Clare Drake Arena, named after long-time coach Clare Drake.[6] Professor W. G. Hardy coached the men's team from 1922 to 1926, and played a leading role in getting the first ice hockey rink built at the university campus in 1927.[7]

Varsity teamsEdit

Men's sports Women's sports
Basketball Basketball
Cross country Cross country
Curling Curling
Football Rugby
Golf Golf
Ice hockey Ice hockey
Soccer Soccer
Swimming Swimming
Tennis Tennis
Track and field Track and field
Volleyball Volleyball
Wrestling Wrestling
† – Track and field includes both indoor and outdoor

Golden Bears footballEdit

The Golden Bears football program has been in competition since 1910.[8] The Golden Bears have won three Vanier Cup national championships, in 1967, 1972 and most recently in 1980.[8] The program has also won 16 Hardy Cup conference titles, which is the third most championships won in the conference.[9] The program has also had three players win the Hec Crighton Trophy, with Mel Smith winning in 1971, Bryan Fryer winning in 1975, and most recently Ed Ilnicki winning the award in 2017.[10]

 
The Golden Bears played against the Edmonton Oilers rookies in 2014.

Golden Bears ice hockeyEdit

The men's ice hockey program has been competing since 1908, in the same year that the University of Alberta was first established.[3] The Golden Bears have won the most David Johnston University Cup championships with 16 wins, most recently in 2018.[11] The program has also featured 55 conference championship teams, including a recent period of domination where Golden Bear teams have won 16 out of 20 Canada West championships from 2000 to 2020.[12] The team's head coach, Ian Herbers, returned to the team in 2018 following a stint with the Edmonton Oilers after previously being the team's head coach for three seasons from 2012 to 2015.[13]

Pandas ice hockeyEdit

The University of Alberta has featured a women's ice hockey program since at least 1913, near the beginning years of the school's creation in 1908.[3] Since U Sports women's ice hockey became a nationally sanctioned sport in 1997, the Pandas have been the most prolific program in the country with eight national championships won, with the most recent victory occurring in 2017.[14] The program has also been dominant in Canada West play as Panda teams have won 14 conference championships, including seven in a row from 2001 to 2008.[15] The team has been led by head coach Howie Draper since the inaugural season in 1997–98.[16]

Golden Bears volleyballEdit

The Golden Bears men's volleyball first began intercollegiate play in the 1955–56 season and has competed in the Canada West conference since the 1971–72 season.[17] The Golden Bears first won a U Sports men's volleyball championship in 1981 and have won eight national championships in total, which is the third-most out of all of the U Sports men's volleyball programs.[18] The program has also featured 13 Canada West conference champions, most recently in 2015 when the Golden Bears also won their most recent national championship.[19] Golden Bears players have won the U Sports Men's Volleyball Player of the Year award eight times, the most in the country, with Terry Danyluk winning the first two and while the other six players were coached by Danyluk when he was the team's head coach.[20]

Pandas volleyballEdit

The Pandas women's volleyball program first began in the 1950s where the team won their first Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union championship in 1953.[3][21] The Pandas first qualified for the U Sports women's volleyball championship tournament in 1993 under the direction of then-second year head coach Laurie Eisler and soon won the first national championship in team history in 1995.[22] The Pandas then repeated as champions five times to tie the U Sports women's volleyball record with six consecutive national championships won.[3] The team won their seventh and most recent national championship in 2007, with their seven wins second only to the UBC Thunderbirds.[23] The Pandas have also won 18 conference titles with their most recent occurring in 2017.[21] Eisler continues to serve as the team's head coach and has won the Marilyn Pomfret Award as the U Sports Coach of the Year three times.[24][25] Four Pandas players have won the Mary Lyons Award with Miroslava Pribylova winning in 1996 and 1997, Jenny Cartmell winning in 1999 and 2000, Tiffany Dodds winning in 2007, and Meg Casault winning most recently in 2017.[26]

Golden Bears awards and standingsEdit

The Golden Bears are considered a strong school team in Canada in multiple sports. The hockey and volleyball teams, in particular, are frequent challengers in U Sports national championships.

In addition to their success over Canadian competition, the Golden Bears host the annual Husky Energy Can-Am Challenge of Champions tournament, where they frequently spearhead the Canadian contingent's success. This tournament sees four top teams from both Canada and the USA competing for supremacy, with the Canadian teams holding the overall title, having won 9 of the 13 tournaments.

ChampionshipsEdit

Sport National Championships Additional National Appearances Conference Championships Conference Podiums
Basketball 3 (1994, 1995, 2002)[27] 10 (1974, 1977, 1990 (7th), 1996 (2nd), 1998 (7th), 1999 (2nd), 2000 (5th), 2003 (t3), 2005 (t5), 2008 (t7), 2012 (t2) 13 (1969, 1973, 1974, 1977, 1985, 1987, 1990, 1994, 1999, 2000, 2005, 2012, 2014, 2017)[28] 24 (1st – 10, 2nd – 6, 3rd – 8)
Cross-Country 1 (1980)[27] 16 (1983 (2nd), 1984 (4th), 1985 (4th), 1986 (2nd), 1997 (5th), 1998 (12th), 1999 (9th), 2000 (2nd), 2001 (4th), 2002 (3rd), 2003 (3rd), 2004 (3rd), 2005 (4th), 2006 (7th), 2007 (12th), 2008 (t9) 12 (1975, 1976, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004)[28] 22 (1st – 12, 2nd – 6, 3rd – 4)
Curling 3 (2012, 2015, 2018)[27] 3 (2008, 2010, 2011) 5 (1973, 1974, 1975, 2019, 2020)[28] -
Football 3 (1967, 1972, 1980)[27] 3 (1965, 1971, 1981) 16 (1922, 1926, 1928, 1944, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1960, 1963, 1964, 1967, 1971, 1972, 1979, 1980, 1981)[9] 22 (1st – 16, 2nd – 6)
Hockey 16 (1964, 1968, 1975, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1986, 1992, 1999, 2000, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2014, 2015, 2018)[27] 22 (1966 (2nd), 1969 (3rd), 1970, 1972 (3rd), 1973, 1977, 1984, 1985 (2nd), 1987, 1989, 1991 (2nd), 1993, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2003 (3rd), 2004 (4th), 2009, 2010 (2nd), 2011, 2013) 55 (1934, 1936–1940, 1946–1951, 1954–1958, 1960–1962, 1964, 1966–1970, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977–1979, 1984, 1985, 1989, 1991–1993, 1997, 2001–2006, 2008–2011, 2013–2015, 2017–2019)[28] 39 (1st – 25, 2nd – 10, 3rd – 4)
Soccer 5 (1972, 1979, 2003, 2006, 2016)[27] 7 (1973 (2nd), 1981 (2nd), 1988 (3rd), 1994 (2nd), 1995 (2nd), 1998 (2nd), 1999 (2nd)) 11 (1972, 1973, 1979, 1981, 1988, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2011, 2017)[28] 31 (1st – 9, 2nd – 8, 3rd – 14)
Swimming 0[27] 37 (1972–2009: 2nd – 2, 3rd – 10, 4th – 7, 5th – 2, 6th – 5, 7th – 2, 8th – 2, 9th – 1, 10th – 2, 12th – 3, 18th – 1) 15 (1961, 1963, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1978, 1979, 1992, 1993, 1996)[28] 32 (1st – 9, 2nd – 7, 3rd – 16)
Track and Field 1 (2001)[27] 27 (1981–1987, 1989–2000, 2002–2009: 2nd – 3, 3rd – 5, 4th – 2, 5th – 3, 6th – 4, 7th – 2, 8th – 1, 10th – 2, 11th – 2, 14th – 1, 16th – 1, 19th – 1) 7 (1978, 1979, 1980, 1982, 1993, 2006, 2018)[28] 25 (1st – 6, 2nd – 11, 3rd – 8)
Volleyball 8 (1981, 1997, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2014, 2015)[27] 18 (1975 (2nd), 1980 (3rd), 1990 (6th), 1993 (5th), 1994 (4th), 1995 (4th), 1996 (2nd), 1998 (3rd), 1999 (3rd), 2001 (5th), 2003 (2nd), 2004 (2nd), 2006 (2nd), 2007 (2nd), 2010 (3rd), 2011 (5th), 2012 (6th), 2013 (5th)) 16 (1961, 1966, 1975, 1981, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2014, 2015)[28] 30 (1st – 13, 2nd – 11, 3rd – 6)
Wrestling 4 (1970, 1971, 1972, 2013)[27] 33 (1980, 1983–1987, 1989–2015: 1st – 1, 2nd – 1, 3rd – 2, 4th – 1, 5th – 4, 6th – 3, 7th – 4, 8th – 2, 9th – 3, 10th – 4, 11th – 2, 13th – 1, 14th – 1, 16th – 1) 18 (1963, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1985, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2017, 2018, 2019)[28] 27 (1st – 15, 2nd – 7, 3rd – 5)
Total 44 176 168 252 (1st – 115, 2nd – 72, 3rd – 65)

Awards and honorsEdit

Athletes of the YearEdit

The female athlete of the year is awarded the Bakewell Trophy while the Wilson Challenge Trophy is presented to the male athlete of the year.

Year Female Athlete Sport Male Athlete Sport
2019-20[29] Kory White Volleyball Max Elgert Volleyball

Canada West Hall of FameEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "About Us – University of Alberta". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  2. ^ "Our Colors - Marketing & Communcications - University of Alberta". Retrieved August 11, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Athletics History – University of Alberta". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  4. ^ "Foote Field". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  5. ^ "Competition Gym – Saville Community Sports Centre". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  6. ^ "Clare Drake Arena". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  7. ^ "Dr. W. George Hardy (Builder)". Canada West Hall of Fame. Canada West Universities Athletic Association. November 15, 2019. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  8. ^ a b "Team History – Golden Bears Football". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  9. ^ a b "Football history". Canada West. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  10. ^ "Hec Crighton Trophy (Most Outstanding Player)" (PDF). U Sports. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  11. ^ "Final: Golden Bears golden again". U Sports. March 18, 2018.
  12. ^ "Golden Bears hockey team history". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  13. ^ "Ian Herbers". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  14. ^ "Young Pandas bring home eighth national women's hockey title back to Alberta". U Sports. April 18, 2017.
  15. ^ "Pandas hockey team history". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  16. ^ "Howie Draper". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  17. ^ "2018-19 University of Alberta Golden Bears Volleyball Media Guide" (PDF). U Sports. 2019. Retrieved 14 May 2021.
  18. ^ "U Sports Volleyball Championship History". usports.ca. U Sports. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  19. ^ "Golden Bears volleyball program history". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  20. ^ "Of the Year" (PDF). U Sports. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  21. ^ a b "Women's volleyball history records". Canada West. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  22. ^ "Pandas volleyball program history". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  23. ^ "U Sports Volleyball Championship History". U Sports. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  24. ^ "Laurie Eisler". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  25. ^ "Marilyn Pomfret Award" (PDF). U Sports. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  26. ^ "Mary Lyons Award (Play of the Year)" (PDF). U Sports. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "National championships". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Canada West championships". Alberta Golden Bears and Pandas. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  29. ^ "Alberta Golden Bears & Pandas: Elgert and White named Athletes of the Year". usports.ca/. 2020-04-14. Retrieved 2021-07-26.
  30. ^ "Janine Helland WSOC Student-athlete". canadawesthalloffame.org/. 2019-09-16. Retrieved 2021-07-26.

External linksEdit