Al-Khanqah al-Salahiyya Mosque

The Al-Khanqah al-Salahiyya Mosque (Arabic: مسجد الخانقاه الصلاحية al-Khānqāh aṣ-Ṣalāḥiyya) is an Islamic place of worship located in the Christian Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem, north of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.[1][2][3] It was named after Saladin, who endowed it. As the name indicates, the complex was originally a khanqah, a place for gatherings of Sufi Islamic adherents, including dervishes. The complex today comprises the mosque as well as a school, a public sitting room, rooms for military officers, a dining room for wayfarers, small rooms for guards, and a very small room for Saladin’s spiritual retreat.[4]

Al-Khanqah al-Salahiyya Mosque
مسجد الخانقاه الصلاحية
Al-Khanka Mosque in the old Jerusalem.jpg
Ottoman period
Religion
AffiliationIslam
DistrictJerusalem
Location
LocationChristian Quarter, Old City, Jerusalem
Architecture
TypeMosque
StyleAyyubid, Ottoman
Minaret(s)1

HistoryEdit

The building is situated on the former palace of the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem.

Following the Crusader surrender of Jerusalem to Ṣalāḥ ad-Dīn (Saladin) in 1187, it became al-Khānqāh aṣ-Ṣalāḥiyya (lit.'the lodge of Saladin'). The building comprised a mosque, a school, a public sitting room, rooms for military officers, a dining room for wayfarers, and small rooms originally for guards, as well as a very small room for Salah ad-Din (Saladin)'s spiritual retreat. As the name indicates, it has also been a Khanqah, a convent of Sufi adherents.[4]

The minaret was built in 1417, during the Mamluk period.[5][6] The minaret is almost identical to that of the Mosque of Omar, located on the other side of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.[2] The two minarets were obviously designed as a pair; a line connecting the two minarets would intersect the door of the Tomb of Jesus inside the church, and the minarets are equidistant to that door[7] with their tops at exactly the same elevation despite starting at different ground levels.[8]

 
The 1936 Survey of Palestine map – the Khanqa mosque is number 35

GalleryEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "al-Khanqah al-Salahiyya Mosque - Madain Project (en)". madainproject.com. Retrieved 2022-06-18.
  2. ^ a b "El-Khanqah as-Salahiyya Moschee in Jerusalem, Bilderserie, Fotos, Photos für DSL". www.theologische-links.de. Retrieved 2022-06-18.
  3. ^ PASSIA ISLAMIC AND CHRISTIAN HOLY PLACES
  4. ^ a b Murphy-O'Connor, Jerome (2008-02-28). The Holy Land: An Oxford Archaeological Guide from Earliest Times to 1700. OUP Oxford. ISBN 978-0-19-152867-5.
  5. ^ Winter, Dave & Matthews, John (1999). Israel Handbook, p. 147. Footprint Travel Guides. ISBN 1-900949-48-2
  6. ^ Moudjir ed-Dyn (1876), p. 169
  7. ^ El Khanqah-Moschee in Jerusalem (German text and pictures at theologische-links.de)
  8. ^ Murphy-O’Connor, J. (2008). The Holy Land: An Oxford Archaeological Guide from Earliest Times to 1700. Oxford Archaeological Guides. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 62. ISBN 978-0-19-923666-4. Retrieved 20 June 2016.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 31°46′43.68″N 35°13′45.53″E / 31.7788000°N 35.2293139°E / 31.7788000; 35.2293139