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Aizuwakamatsu (会津若松市, Aizuwakamatsu-shi) is a city in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. As of 1 November 2018, the city had an estimated population of 120,733 in 49,942 households [1], and a population density of 320 persons per km². The total area of the city was 382.97 square kilometres (147.87 sq mi).

Aizuwakamatsu

会津若松市
Aizuwakamatsu skyline
Aizuwakamatsu skyline
Flag of Aizuwakamatsu
Flag
Official seal of Aizuwakamatsu
Seal
Location of Aizuwakamatsu in Fukushima Prefecture
Location of Aizuwakamatsu in Fukushima Prefecture
Aizuwakamatsu is located in Japan
Aizuwakamatsu
Aizuwakamatsu
 
Coordinates: 37°29′41.4″N 139°55′47.1″E / 37.494833°N 139.929750°E / 37.494833; 139.929750Coordinates: 37°29′41.4″N 139°55′47.1″E / 37.494833°N 139.929750°E / 37.494833; 139.929750
CountryJapan
RegionTōhoku
PrefectureFukushima
Government
 • MayorIchirō Kanke
Area
 • Total382.97 km2 (147.87 sq mi)
Population
 (November 1, 2018)
 • Total120,733
 • Density320/km2 (820/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+9 (Japan Standard Time)
– TreeJapanese Red Pine
– FlowerCommon Hollyhock
– BirdCommon cuckoo
Phone number0242-39-1111
Address3–46 Higashisakaemachi, Aizuwakamatsu-shi, Fukushima-ken 965-8601
WebsiteOfficial website
Aizuwakamatsu City Hall
Higashiyama Onsen

Contents

HistoryEdit

The area of present-day Aizuwakamatsu was part of ancient Mutsu Province, and was settled from prehistoric times. The Aizu-Otsuka Kofun within the city borders dates from the 4th century AD, and is an Important Cultural Property. During the Sengoku period and in the Edo period, the area developed as a castle town to Aizu Domain and was the location of the Battle of Aizu, one of the largest conflicts of the Boshin War. After the Meiji Restoration, Wakamatsu Town was created with the establishment of the modern municipalities system on April 1, 1889. It became Wakamatsu City in 1899. The name was changed to Aizuwakamatsu in 1955.

GeographyEdit

 
Mount Iimori

Aizuwakamatsu is located in the western part of Fukushima Prefecture, in the southeast part of Aizu basin.

MountainsEdit

RiversEdit

LakesEdit

Hot springsEdit

Administrative divisionsEdit

There are 11 administrative divisions (hamlets or 大字 (ooaza)) in the city.[2]

  • Wakamatsu
  • Machikita
  • Kouya
  • Kouzashi
  • Monden
  • Ikki
  • Higashiyama
  • Ōto
  • Minato
  • Kitaaizu
  • Kawahigashi

Neighboring municipalitiesEdit

Fukushima Prefecture

ClimateEdit

Aizuwakamatsu has a Humid continental climate (Köppen Dfb) characterized by warm summers and cold winters with heavy snowfall. Although it is located in an inland valley, Aizuwakamatsu's climate resembles that of the Hokuriku region on the Sea of Japan coast. Snowfall is very heavy during the winter at 4.78 metres (190 in), and snow cover reaches an average maximum of 0.39 metres (15.35 in) and has reached as much as 1.15 metres (45.3 in) for short periods, a figure one would usually associate with much colder regions like the Labrador Peninsula. The average annual temperature in Aizuwakamatsu is 11.2 °C. The average annual rainfall is 1270 mm with September as the wettest month.The temperatures are highest on average in August, at around 24.7 °C, and lowest in January, at around -1.2 °C.[3]

Climate data for Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima (1981~2010)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 13.1
(55.6)
15.9
(60.6)
22.8
(73.0)
30.5
(86.9)
33.3
(91.9)
34.3
(93.7)
36.7
(98.1)
38.1
(100.6)
35.4
(95.7)
30.9
(87.6)
24.5
(76.1)
20.9
(69.6)
38.1
(100.6)
Average high °C (°F) 2.6
(36.7)
3.6
(38.5)
8.2
(46.8)
16.4
(61.5)
22.1
(71.8)
25.4
(77.7)
28.6
(83.5)
30.6
(87.1)
25.6
(78.1)
19.0
(66.2)
11.8
(53.2)
5.7
(42.3)
16.7
(62.1)
Average low °C (°F) −3.7
(25.3)
−3.6
(25.5)
−1
(30)
4.2
(39.6)
10.0
(50.0)
15.5
(59.9)
19.5
(67.1)
20.6
(69.1)
16.3
(61.3)
9.2
(48.6)
3.1
(37.6)
−0.9
(30.4)
7.4
(45.3)
Record low °C (°F) −14.4
(6.1)
−15.2
(4.6)
−11.9
(10.6)
−4.6
(23.7)
−1.2
(29.8)
6.9
(44.4)
9.1
(48.4)
10.3
(50.5)
4.8
(40.6)
−1.5
(29.3)
−5.9
(21.4)
−14.4
(6.1)
−15.2
(4.6)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 95.3
(3.75)
71.4
(2.81)
71.7
(2.82)
64.3
(2.53)
80.0
(3.15)
110.8
(4.36)
175.8
(6.92)
134.3
(5.29)
136.9
(5.39)
100.1
(3.94)
78.9
(3.11)
93.8
(3.69)
1,213.3
(47.76)
Average snowfall cm (inches) 171
(67)
142
(56)
66
(26)
5
(2.0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
6
(2.4)
83
(33)
473
(186.4)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.5 mm) 18.7 16.2 16.8 12.0 11.4 12.4 14.8 11.0 12.9 12.9 15.1 17.5 171.7
Average snowy days 27.0 24.3 12.3 0.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 12.4 77.8
Average relative humidity (%) 82 79 74 67 68 73 78 76 79 80 82 83 77
Mean monthly sunshine hours 78.5 98.8 138.2 172.7 193.6 161.9 159.8 198.7 132.1 121.1 86.8 70.7 1,612.9
Source #1: Japan Meteorological Agency[4]
Source #2: Japan Meteorological Agency (records)[5]

MergersEdit

  • On April 1, 1937, a part of Machikita village (from Kitaaizu District) was merged into the city of Wakamatsu.
  • On April 1, 1951, the village of Machikita (remaining parts) (from Kitaaizu District) was later merged into Wakamatsu.
  • On January 1, 1955, seven villages of Kitaaizu District (Kouya, Kouzashi, Monden, Ikki, Higashiyama, Ōto and Minato) were merged into Wakamatsu. The city's name changed to Aizuwakamatsu.
  • On April 1, 1955, a part of the town of Hongō (locality of Oya) (from Ōnuma District) was merged into Aizuwakamatsu.
  • On November 1, 2004, the village of Kitaaizu (from Kitaaizu District) was merged into Aizuwakamatsu. Kitaaizu District was dissolved as a result.
  • On November 1, 2005, the town of Kawahigashi (from Kawanuma District) was merged into Aizuwakamatsu.

DemographicsEdit

Per Japanese census data,[6] the population of Aizuwakamatsu has not increased over the past 40 years.

Census Year Population
1970 120,839
1980 130,883
1990 136,336
2000 135,415
2010 126,125

GovernmentEdit

Aizuwakamatsu has a mayor-council form of government with a directly elected mayor and a unicameral city legislature of 29 members[7] The city contributes four members to the Fukushima Prefectural Assembly. In terms of national politics, the city is part of Fukushima Electoral District 4 for the lower house of the Diet of Japan.

EconomyEdit

Aizuwakamatsu is a local commercial center. The area is traditionally noted for sake brewing and lacquerware. Modern industries include textiles, wood processing and electronics.[8]

EducationEdit

Aizuwakamatsu has one prefectural university and a private junior college. The city has 19 public elementary school and 11 public junior high schools operated by the city government. In addition, the is one private elementary school and one private junior high school. The Fukushima Prefectural Board of Education operates five public high schools and one combined junior/senior high school. The prefecture also operates two special education schools.

Universities and collegesEdit

Senior high schoolsEdit

Public (prefectural)Edit

  • Aizu High School (会津高等学校)
  • Aoi High School (葵高等学校)
  • Aizu Gakuhō High School (会津学鳳高等学校)
  • Wakamatsu Shōgyō High School (若松商業高等学校)
  • Aizu Kōgyō High School (若松工業高等学校)
  • Aizu Second High School (会津第二高等学校)

PrivateEdit

  • Aizuwakamatsu Xaverio Gakuen High School (会津若松ザベリオ学園高等学校)
  • Wakamatsu 1st High School (若松第一高等学校)
  • Jinai High School (仁愛高等学校)

Junior high schoolsEdit

Public (municipal)Edit

  • Aizuwakamatsu First Junior High School (会津若松市立第一中学校)
  • Aizuwakamatsu Second Junior High School (会津若松市立第二中学校)
  • Aizuwakamatsu Third Junior High School (会津若松市立第三中学校)
  • Aizuwakamatsu Fourth Junior High School (会津若松市立第四中学校)
  • Aizuwakamatsu Fifth Junior High School (会津若松市立第五中学校)
  • Aizuwakamatsu Sixth Junior High School (会津若松市立第六中学校)
  • Ikki Junior High School (一箕中学校)
  • Ōto Junior High School (大戸中学校)
  • Minato Junior High School (湊中学校)
  • Kitaaizu Junior High School (北会津中学校)
  • Kawahigashi Junior High School (河東中学校)
  • Aizu Gakuhō Junior High School (会津学鳳中学校, prefectural)
    • Note: All junior high schools are municipal except for Aizu Gakuhō Junior High School.

PrivateEdit

  • Aizuwakamatsu Xaverio Gakuen Junior High School (会津若松ザベリオ学園中学校)

TransportationEdit

MediaEdit

TelevisionEdit

NewspapersEdit

  • Fukushima Mimpō
  • Fukushima Min-Yū

RadioEdit

  • FM Aizu

Sister city relationsEdit

Japanese sister citiesEdit

International sister citiesEdit

Local attractionsEdit

 
Aizuwakamatsu Castle

CultureEdit

FestivalsEdit

  • Aizu Festival

FoodsEdit

  • Kozuyu
  • Sauce Katsu-don
  • Basashi (horse sashimi)
  • Soba
  • Boutara
  • Sake

OthersEdit

Notable people from AizuwakamatsuEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Aizuwakamatsu city official statistics‹See Tfd›(in Japanese)
  2. ^ 毎月大字別人口 Archived 2011-07-26 at the Wayback Machine ‹See Tfd›(in Japanese)
  3. ^ Aizuwakamatsu climate data
  4. ^ "平年値(年・月ごとの値)". Japan Meteorological Agency. Retrieved 2011-11-26.
  5. ^ "観測史上1~10位の値(年間を通じての値)". Japan Meteorological Agency. Retrieved 2011-11-26.
  6. ^ Aizuwakamatsu population statistics
  7. ^ Aizuwakamatsu city council home page‹See Tfd›(in Japanese)
  8. ^ Campbell, Allen; Nobel, David S (1993). Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia. Kodansha. p. 24. ISBN 406205938X.
  9. ^ Hubei provincial government site

External linksEdit