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Airports of Thailand Public Company Limited (AOT) (Thai: บริษัท ท่าอากาศยานไทย จำกัด (มหาชน)) is a Thai public company. It manages Thailand's six international airports and will add four more airports in 2019.[4][5] In 2018, it became the most-valuable airport operator in the world.[6]

Airports of Thailand
ท่าอากาศยานไทย
Government-owned Public
Traded asSETAOT
IndustryServices [1]
Founded1 July 1979; 40 years ago (1979-07-01)
Headquarters333 Cherdwutagard Road, Srikan, Don Mueang District, Bangkok, Thailand
Key people
  • Prasong Poontaneat (Chairman)
  • Nittinai Sirismatthakarn (President)
ProductsAirport operations and services
RevenueIncrease 56.74 billion baht (FY2017)[2]
Increase 20.68 billion baht (FY2017)[2]
Total assetsIncrease 178.40 billion baht (FY2017)[2]
Number of employees
6,044 (2015)[3]:59
ParentParent Organization Ministry of Transport Major holder Ministry of Finance
Websiteairportthai.co.th

Thailand's 28 regional airports are managed by the Department of Airports, a separate agency.

AOT was established on 20 September 2002, as a result of the privatisation of the state-owned Airports Authority of Thailand (AAT). At that time, the company was worth 14,285,700,000 baht. The Thai government held, and still holds, 70 percent of the company's stock.[7]:39[3]:41 During fiscal year 2014 AOT's average daily market capitalization was 282,321 million baht.[8]:4

AOT's fiscal year (FY) runs from 1 October–30 September, thus AOT's FY2018 was from 1 October 2017–30 September 2018.[8]:9

Contents

AOT airportsEdit

AOT operates the following airports in Thailand:[8]:3 The statistics are shown for calendar years.

Name Region 2017 Statistics[9] 2016 Statistics
Passengers Movements Passengers Movements
1 Suvarnabhumi Airport (BKK) Central 60,860,704 350,508 55,892,428 336,345
2 Don Mueang International Airport (DMK) Central 38,299,757 256,760 35,203,757 244,296
3 Phuket International Airport (HKT) Southern 16,855,637 106,093 15,107,185 97,813
4 Chiang Mai International Airport (CNX) Northern 10,230,070 71,993 9,446,320 69,202
5 Hat Yai International Airport (HDY) Southern 4,367,364 30,067 4,002,487 28,097
6 Mae Fah Luang–Chiang Rai International Airport (CEI) Northern 2,503,375 17,661 2,038,389 14,432
Total 133,116,907 833,082 121,692,744 790,194

AOT had planned to assume management of Udon Thani International Airport, Sakon Nakhon Airport, Tak Airport, and Chumphon Airport from the Department of Airports in 2019.[4] In August 2019, it announced that its plans had been amended; it would assume control of Udon, Tak, Buriram, and Krabi airports, leaving Sakon Nakhon and Chumphon to the DOA. DOA is resisting the change as Udon and Krabi are its money-making airports; Nakon Sakhon and Chumphon are not.[5]

StatisticsEdit

Thailand's six AOT airports saw growth in passenger traffic of 21.3 percent in 2015, setting a new record of just under 110 million passengers. Aircraft movements—take-offs and landings—grew in tandem by 16.6 percent from the previous year to 727,750. The growth is expected to continue through 2016 with AOT projecting an 11 percent increase in combined passenger throughput. Air freight moved through the airports remained largely stagnant in 2015, with a marginal 0.63 percent increase to 1.38 million tonnes, reflecting sluggish global trade.[10]

PlansEdit

AOT is budgeting 220 billion baht in 2018 for the creation of two new airports and the expansion of four existing airports owned by the Department of Airports. AOT intends to build Chiang Mai 2 in Lamphun Province and Phuket Airport 2 in Phang Nga Province. The four regional, DOA-managed airports that AOT wants to control are the Buriram, Tak, Krabi, and Udon Thani airports.[5][11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Companies/Securities in Focus: AOT The Stock Exchange of Thailand
  2. ^ a b c "Companies/Securities in Focus; AOT: AIRPORTS OF THAILAND PUBLIC COMPANY LIMITED". SET. Stock Exchange of Thailand. Retrieved 31 December 2016.
  3. ^ a b "Annual Report 2015 Airports of Thailand Public Company Limited" (PDF). AOT PLC. Airports of Thailand PLC. Retrieved 23 Jan 2016.
  4. ^ a b "AoT to take control of four airports". Bangkok Post. 2019-01-24. Retrieved 2019-01-26.
  5. ^ a b c Hongtong, Thodsapol (23 August 2019). "Department of Airports protests Krabi airport bid". Bangkok Post. Retrieved 23 August 2019.
  6. ^ "World's Most-Valuable Airport Operator Is Now in Thailand". Bloomberg. Retrieved 5 January 2018.
  7. ^ "Annual Report 2017; Beyond the Boundary" (PDF). Airports of Thailand PLC. 2018. Retrieved 28 July 2018.
  8. ^ a b c "Airports of Thailand PLC for the Fiscal Year 2015 (Oct 2014–Sep 2015)" (PDF). AOT Investor Relations Center. Airports of Thailand PLC. Retrieved 16 February 2015.
  9. ^ AOT Air Traffic Calendar Year 2017 (Jan-Dec 2017) Airports of Thailand
  10. ^ Kositchotethana, Boonsong (2016-02-01). "AoT airports set new record in passenger traffic". Bangkok Post. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  11. ^ Sritama, Suchat (29 July 2018). "Bursting the Tourism Bubble". Bangkok Post. Retrieved 4 August 2018.

External linksEdit

  Media related to Airports of Thailand at Wikimedia Commons