Aghazadeh

Aghazadeh (Persian: آقازاده‎, lit.'born to Agha or noble-born')[1] is a term that entered the colloquialism in Iran in the 1990s[2] to describe the children of elite who emerge as the men of means and influence, usually in a way that resembles familial nepotism and corruption.[3] This includes utilization of the positions within the hierarchy to gain inside information and preferential status which results in replication of wealth and power across generations[3] and means "fewer top positions are available to talented people without family connections".[4]

The phenomenon is exemplified with family members of high-ranking officials such as Hashemi Rafsanjani, Nategh Nouri and Vaez Tabasi.[5]

In 2017, Zhen-e Khoob (Persian: ژن خوب‎ meaning good genes), a new term was coined and became synonymous with Aghazadehs and "the privileges they enjoy".[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Eskandar Sadeghi-Boroujerdi (25 September 2012), "Rafsanjani reacts to his Son's Arrest; Ahmadinejad's Last Visit to New York", Al-Monitor, archived from the original on 5 August 2017, retrieved 15 July 2017
  2. ^ Barry Rubin (2015). "Blocked Postwar Recovery". The Middle East: A Guide to Politics, Economics, Society and Culture. Routledge. p. 199. ISBN 9781317455783.
  3. ^ a b Suzanne Maloney (2015). Iran's Political Economy since the Revolution. Cambridge University Press. p. 239. ISBN 978-0521738149.
  4. ^ Mehdi Khalaji (11 June 2014), "Ailing Official Highlights Concentration of Power in Iran", The Washington Institute for Near East Policy (Policy Alert), retrieved 15 July 2017
  5. ^ Suzanne Maloney (2015). Iran's Political Economy since the Revolution. Cambridge University Press. p. 240. ISBN 978-0521738149.
  6. ^ Golnaz Esfandiari (5 September 2017), "Firestorm In Iran As Politician's Son Credits 'Good Genes' For His Success", Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, retrieved 5 September 2017