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Iguania is an infraorder of squamate reptiles that includes iguanas, chameleons, agamids, and New World lizards like anoles and phrynosomatids. Using morphological features as a guide to evolutionary relationships, the Iguania are believed to form the sister group to the remainder of the Squamata. However, molecular information has placed Iguania well within the Squamata as sister taxa to the Anguimorpha and closely related to snakes.[1] Iguanians are largely arboreal and usually have primitive fleshy, non-prehensile tongues, although the tongue is highly modified in chameleons. The group has a fossil record that extends back to the Early Jurassic (the oldest known member is Bharatagama, which lived about 190 million years ago in what is now India).[2]

Iguanomorpha
Temporal range: Early Jurassic - present, 190–0 Ma
Leiocephalus-personatus-maskenleguan.jpg
Leiocephalus personatus, a species of iguanian
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Clade: Iguanomorpha
Suborder: Iguania
Families

Agamidae
Chamaeleonidae
Corytophanidae
Crotaphytidae
Dactyloidae
Hoplocercidae
Iguanidae
Leiocephalidae
Leiosauridae
Liolaemidae
Opluridae
Phrynosomatidae
Polychrotidae
Tropiduridae

ClassificationEdit

The Iguania currently include these extant families:[3][4]

PhylogenyEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Vidal, N.; Hedges, S. B. (2005). "The phylogeny of squamate reptiles (lizards, snakes, and amphisbaenians) inferred from nine nuclear protein-coding genes" (PDF). Comptes Rendus Biologies. 328 (10-11): 1000–1008. doi:10.1016/j.crvi.2005.10.001. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-26. 
  2. ^ Evans, Susan E.; Prasad, G. V. R.; Manhas, B. K. (2002). "Fossil lizards from the Jurassic Kota Formation of India". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22 (2): 299. doi:10.1671/0272-4634(2002)022[0299:FLFTJK]2.0.CO;2. 
  3. ^ Wiens, J.J., C. R. Hutter, D. G. Mulcahy, B. P. Noonan, T. M. Townsend, J. W. Sites Jr., T. W. Reeder. (2012) Resolving the phylogeny of lizards and snakes (Squamata) with extensive sampling of genes and species. Biology Letters
  4. ^ Schulte II, J. A., J. P. Valladares, and A. Larson. (2003) [Phylogenetic relationships within Iguanidae inferred using molecular and morphological data and a phylogenetic taxonomy of iguanian lizards.] Herpetologica 59: 399-419
  5. ^ Daza, J. D.; Abdala, V.; Arias, J. S.; García-López, D.; Ortiz, P. (2012). "Cladistic Analysis of Iguania and a Fossil Lizard from the Late Pliocene of Northwestern Argentina". Journal of Herpetology. 46: 104. doi:10.1670/10-112.