Absecon, New Jersey

Absecon (pronounced ab-SEE-con[20]) is a city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 8,411,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 773 (+10.1%) from the 7,638 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 340 (+4.7%) from the 7,298 counted in the 1990 Census.[21]

Absecon, New Jersey
City of Absecon
Dr. Jonathan Pitney House
Dr. Jonathan Pitney House
Map of Absecon in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Absecon in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Absecon, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Absecon, New Jersey
Absecon is located in Atlantic County, New Jersey
Absecon
Absecon
Location in Atlantic County
Absecon is located in New Jersey
Absecon
Absecon
Location in New Jersey
Absecon is located in the United States
Absecon
Absecon
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 39°25′25″N 74°29′35″W / 39.423563°N 74.493025°W / 39.423563; -74.493025Coordinates: 39°25′25″N 74°29′35″W / 39.423563°N 74.493025°W / 39.423563; -74.493025[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyAtlantic
IncorporatedFebruary 29, 1872 (as town)
ReincorporatedMarch 24, 1902 (as city)
Named forAbsegami Native Americans
Government
 • TypeCity
 • BodyCity Council
 • MayorKimberly Dalton Horton (D, term ends December 31, 2020)[3][4]
 • AdministratorJessica Thompson[5]
 • Municipal clerkCarrie A. Crone[6]
Area
 • Total7.22 sq mi (18.69 km2)
 • Land5.47 sq mi (14.16 km2)
 • Water1.75 sq mi (4.53 km2)  24.22%
Area rank241st of 565 in state
17th of 23 in county[1]
Elevation3 ft (0.9 m)
Population
 • Total8,411
 • Estimate 
(2019)[12]
8,818
 • Rank272nd of 566 in state
11th of 23 in county[13]
 • Density1,612.66/sq mi (622.62/km2)
 • Density rank329th of 566 in state
9th of 23 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Codes
08201, 08205[14][15]
Area code(s)609 exchanges: 404, 652, 748[16]
FIPS code3400100100[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID0885134[1][19]
Websitewww.abseconnj.gov

The current City of Absecon was originally incorporated as a town by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 29, 1872, from portions of Egg Harbor Township and Galloway Township. Then on March 24, 1902, the City of Absecon replaced the town.[22] The city is named for the Absegami tribe of Native Americans, from the word "Absogami", which means "little stream".[23]

GeographyEdit

According to the United States Census Bureau, Absecon city had a total area of 7.22 square miles (18.69 km2), including 5.47 square miles (14.16 km2) of land and 1.75 square miles (4.53 km2) of water (24.22%).[1][2]

 
Panoramic map of Absecon with list of landmarks and inset images of several as well as Absecon Gardens neighborhood

The city borders the Atlantic County municipalities of Atlantic City, Egg Harbor Township, Galloway Township and Pleasantville.[24][25][26]

ClimateEdit

Climate data for Absecon, New Jersey
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 43.4
(6.3)
43.7
(6.5)
50.6
(10.3)
59.9
(15.5)
69.9
(21.1)
78.9
(26.1)
83.8
(28.8)
82.5
(28.1)
77.1
(25.1)
67.3
(19.6)
56.5
(13.6)
45.7
(7.6)
63.3
(17.4)
Average low °F (°C) 23.6
(−4.7)
23.8
(−4.6)
30.4
(−0.9)
39.4
(4.1)
49.2
(9.6)
58.9
(14.9)
64.0
(17.8)
62.3
(16.8)
55.7
(13.2)
44.6
(7.0)
34.3
(1.3)
25.5
(−3.6)
42.6
(5.9)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.4
(86)
3.1
(79)
3.7
(94)
3.5
(89)
3.3
(84)
3.3
(84)
3.8
(97)
5.1
(130)
3.2
(81)
8.9
(230)
3.5
(89)
3.8
(97)
43.0
(1,090)
Source: Weatherbase[27] Updated On February 18, 2020

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880507
1890501−1.2%
19005305.8%
191078147.4%
1920702−10.1%
19302,158207.4%
19402,084−3.4%
19502,35513.0%
19604,32083.4%
19706,09441.1%
19806,85912.6%
19907,2986.4%
20007,6384.7%
20108,41110.1%
2019 (est.)8,818[12][28]4.8%
Population sources: 1880-2000[29]
1880-1920[30] 1880-1890[31]
1890-1910[32] 1910-1930[33]
1930-1990[34] 2000[35][36] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010Edit

The 2010 United States Census counted 8,411 people, 3,179 households, and 2,254 families in the city. The population density was 1,558.8 inhabitants per square mile (601.9/km2). There were 3,365 housing units at an average density of 623.6 per square mile (240.8/km2). The racial makeup was 76.45% (6,430) White, 9.89% (832) Black or African American, 0.38% (32) Native American, 7.93% (667) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 2.94% (247) from other races, and 2.41% (203) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.50% (631) of the population.[9]

Of the 3,179 households, 27.2% had children under the age of 18; 53.3% were married couples living together; 13.0% had a female householder with no husband present and 29.1% were non-families. Of all households, 22.8% were made up of individuals and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.07.[9]

20.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 23.2% from 25 to 44, 31.8% from 45 to 64, and 17.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.1 years. For every 100 females, the population had 92.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 89.0 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $64,370 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,398) and the median family income was $77,784 (+/- $9,673). Males had a median income of $47,043 (+/- $7,593) versus $43,673 (+/- $3,797) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $31,194 (+/- $4,373). About 5.2% of families and 8.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.4% of those under age 18 and 16.0% of those age 65 or over.[37]

Census 2000Edit

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 7,638 people, 2,773 households, and 2,085 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,336.0 people per square mile (515.6/km2). There were 2,902 housing units at an average density of 507.6 per square mile (195.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 83.31% White, 6.01% African American, 0.17% Native American, 7.46% Asian, 1.51% from other races, and 1.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.77% of the population.[35][36]

There were 2,773 households, out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.6% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.8% were non-families. 19.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.08.[35][36]

In the city, the population was spread out, with 23.5% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 29.6% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 16.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.4 males.[35][36]

The median income for a household in the city was $55,745, and the median income for a family was $61,563. Males had a median income of $47,984 versus $31,663 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,615. About 3.2% of families and 4.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.9% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.[35][36]

GovernmentEdit

Local governmentEdit

Absecon operates under the City form of New Jersey municipal government. The city is one of 15 municipalities (of the 565) statewide that use this traditional form of government.[38] The governing body is comprised of the Mayor and the seven-member City Council. The mayor is elected to a four-year term of office. The City Council is comprised of six members elected from the city's two wards to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with one seat from each ward up for election each year, along with one member elected at-large to a four-year term in office, all of whom are elected on a partisan basis as part of the November general election.[7][39]

As of 2020, the Mayor of Absecon is Democrat Kimberly Horton, the first female mayor in the town's history, who was appointed to serve the term of office ending December 31, 2020, and elected in November 2019 to serve the balance of the term of office.[40] Members of the Absecon City Council are Council President Keith C. Bennett (D, 2022; Ward 1), Donald "Butch" Burroughs (D, 2020; Ward 2 - elected to serve an unexpired term), Sandy Shenk Cain (D, 2021; Ward 2), Caleb N. Cavileer (D, 2022; Ward 2), Elizabeth Howell (D, 2020; Ward 1), Stephen Light (D, 2021; At Large) and Frank Phillips (R, 2021; Ward 1).[41][42][43][44][45][46][47]

In February 2019, the City Council appointed Ward 2 councilmember Kimberley Horton to fill the mayoral seat expiring in December 2020 that had been held by John Armstrong until he resigned from office; Horton will serve on an interim basis until the November 2019 general election.[48] Later that month, Caleb Cavileer was chosen to fill Horton's vacant Ward 2 seat expiring in December 2020.[49] In the November 2019 general election, Cavileer ran for and won a full three-year term and Butch Burroughs was elected to serve the balance of Horton's council term of office, while Horton was elected to complete the mayoral term.[44]

Following the death of Ward 1 Councilmember Donald E. Camp in February 2016,[50] Patrick Sheeran was selected from three candidates nominated by the Republican municipal committee and appointed to fill the vacant seat expiring in December 2016.[51]

Federal, state and county representationEdit

Absecon is located in the 2nd Congressional district[52] and is part of New Jersey's 2nd state legislative district.[10][53][54]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Jeff Van Drew (R, Dennis Township).[55] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[56] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[57][58]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 2nd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Chris A. Brown (R, Ventnor City) and in the General Assembly by Vince Mazzeo (D, Northfield) and John Armato (D, Buena Vista Township).[59][60]

Atlantic County is governed by a directly elected county executive and a nine-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, responsible for legislation. The executive serves a four-year term and the freeholders are elected to staggered three-year terms, of which four are elected from the county on an at-large basis and five of the freeholders represent equally populated districts.[61][62] As of 2018, Atlantic County's Executive is Republican Dennis Levinson, whose term of office ends December 31, 2019.[63] Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders are Chairman Frank D. Formica, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2018, Margate City)[64] Vice Chairwoman Maureen Kern, Freeholder District 2, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part), Linwood, Longport, Margate City, Northfield, Somers Point and Ventnor City (R, 2018, Somers Point),[65] Ashley R. Bennett, Freeholder District 3, including Egg Harbor Township (part) and Hamilton Township (part) (D, 2020, Egg Harbor Township),[66] James A. Bertino, Freeholder District 5, including Buena, Buena Vista Township, Corbin City, Egg Harbor City, Estell Manor, Folsom, Hamilton Township (part), Hammonton, Mullica Township and Weymouth Township (R, 2018, Hammonton),[67] Ernest D. Coursey, Freeholder District 1, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part) and Pleasantville (D, 2019, Atlantic City),[68] Richard R. Dase, Freeholder District 4, including Absecon, Brigantine, Galloway Township and Port Republic (R, 2019, Galloway Township),[69] Caren L. Fitzpatrick, Freeholder At-Large (D, 2020, Linwood),[70] Amy L. Gatto, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2019, Mays Landing in Hamilton Township)[71] and John W. Risley, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2020, Egg Harbor Township)[72][61][73] Atlantic County's constitutional officers are County Clerk Edward P. McGettigan (D, 2021; Linwood),[74] [75]Sheriff Eric Scheffler (D, 2021, Northfield)[76][77] and Surrogate James Curcio (R, 2020, Hammonton).[78][79][80]

PoliticsEdit

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,629 registered voters in Absecon City, of which 1,353 (24.0% vs. 30.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,716 (30.5% vs. 25.2%) were registered as Republicans and 2,557 (45.4% vs. 44.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[81] Among the city's 2010 Census population, 66.9% (vs. 58.8% in Atlantic County) were registered to vote, including 84.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 76.6% countywide).[81][82]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,172 votes (50.6% vs. 57.9% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 2,063 votes (48.1% vs. 41.1%) and other candidates with 43 votes (1.0% vs. 0.9%), among the 4,289 ballots cast by the city's 5,938 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.2% (vs. 65.8% in Atlantic County).[83][84] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,262 votes (49.8% vs. 41.6% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,203 votes (48.5% vs. 56.5%) and other candidates with 41 votes (0.9% vs. 1.1%), among the 4,539 ballots cast by the city's 5,993 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.7% (vs. 68.1% in Atlantic County).[85] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,177 votes (53.6% vs. 46.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,800 votes (44.4% vs. 52.0%) and other candidates with 42 votes (1.0% vs. 0.8%), among the 4,058 ballots cast by the city's 5,201 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.0% (vs. 69.8% in the whole county).[86]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,874 votes (65.0% vs. 60.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 883 votes (30.6% vs. 34.9%) and other candidates with 33 votes (1.1% vs. 1.3%), among the 2,883 ballots cast by the city's 5,991 registered voters, yielding a 48.1% turnout (vs. 41.5% in the county).[87][88] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,501 votes (52.3% vs. 47.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,195 votes (41.6% vs. 44.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 133 votes (4.6% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 21 votes (0.7% vs. 1.2%), among the 2,872 ballots cast by the city's 5,770 registered voters, yielding a 49.8% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[89]

EducationEdit

The Absecon Public School District serve students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2017-18 school year, the district, comprised of two schools, had an enrollment of 887 students and 66.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.4:1.[90] Schools in the district (with 2017-18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics.[91]) are H. Ashton Marsh Elementary School[92] (493 students in grades PreK-4) and Emma C. Attales Middle School[93] (381 students in grades 5-8).[94][95]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students from Absecon attend the Pleasantville High School in Pleasantville as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Pleasantville Public Schools.[96] As of the 2017-18 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 757 students and 77.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.8:1.[97] In 2020, the Absecon district submitted a petition to end its agreement with Pleasantville and send its students to Absegami High School under a new sending/receiving relationship with the Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District that Absecon argues would give its students a better education at a lower cost, without negatively impacting the demographics in Pleasantville High School. About 10% of Absecon's graduating students have been choosing to attend Pleasantville High School, for which the Absecon district has been paying $18,000 per student each year.[98]

City public school students are also eligible to attend the Atlantic County Institute of Technology in the Mays Landing section of Hamilton Township[99] or the Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts, located in Somers Point.[100][101]

Holy Spirit High School is a Roman Catholic high school, that operates under the jurisdiction of the Diocese of Camden.[102][103]

TransportationEdit

 
U.S. Route 9 northbound in Absecon

Roads and highwaysEdit

As of May 2010, the city had a total of 49.71 miles (80.00 km) of roadways, of which 35.12 miles (56.52 km) were maintained by the municipality, 7.54 miles (12.13 km) by Atlantic County and 7.05 miles (11.35 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[104]

Highways and roads in Absecon include U.S. Route 9, U.S. Route 30, Route 157 and County Route 585. The now-defunct Route 43 also passed through the city.

The Atlantic City Expressway and the Garden State Parkway are accessible outside the city in bordering Egg Harbor and Galloway Townships.

Public transportationEdit

 
Absecon station, which is served by NJ Transit's Atlantic City Line

The Absecon station[105] is served by NJ Transit's Atlantic City Line trains, with east-west service between 30th Street Station in Philadelphia and the Atlantic City Rail Terminal in Atlantic City.[106]

NJ Transit provides bus service to and from Atlantic City on routes 508 (to the Hamilton Mall), 554 (to the Lindenwold PATCO station) and 559 (to Lakewood Township).[107][108]

Notable peopleEdit

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Absecon include:

ReferencesEdit

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  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ Mayor Kim Horton, City of Absecon. Accessed September 9, 2019.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  5. ^ City Administrator, City of Absecon. Accessed September 24, 2019.
  6. ^ Office of the Clerk, City of Absecon. Accessed September 24, 2019.
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