Abbey of Saint-Léonard des Chaumes

The Abbey of Saint-Léonard des Chaumes (Latin: Sanctus Leonardus de Calmis)[1] was a Cistercian monastery in Dompierre-sur-Mer in the province of Aunis in the Kingdom of France.[2] It was destroyed in the 18th century.

Saint-Léonard des Chaumes
Sanctus Leonardus de Calmis
Abbey of Saint-Léonard des Chaumes is located in Charente-Maritime
Abbey of Saint-Léonard des Chaumes
Location within Charente-Maritime
Abbey of Saint-Léonard des Chaumes is located in Nouvelle-Aquitaine
Abbey of Saint-Léonard des Chaumes
Abbey of Saint-Léonard des Chaumes (Nouvelle-Aquitaine)
Monastery information
OrderCistercian (since 1168)
Established1036
Mother houseBœuil Abbey (originally)
Billon Abbey
DioceseRoman Catholic Diocese of La Rochelle and Saintes
People
Founder(s)Odo of Gascony
Site
LocationDompierre-sur-Mer, Aunis, Kingdom of France
Coordinates46°10′12″N 01°04′23″W / 46.17000°N 1.07306°W / 46.17000; -1.07306Coordinates: 46°10′12″N 01°04′23″W / 46.17000°N 1.07306°W / 46.17000; -1.07306

HistoryEdit

The abbey was probably founded in 1036 by Odo, Count of Gascony. The establishment was originally poor —chaumes meant "uncultivated land" in Old French.[3] In 1168, the establishment, which had been a priory for a century, joined the Cistercian Order and became a daughter house of Bœuil Abbey in Limousin.[4][5] Later, it was handed over to Billon Abbey.[2]

Like many other abbeys in the 15th-century, Saint-Léonard des Chaumes and its goods were placed under the authority of a layman for whom the monastery was a source of revenue rather than a place of worship. Vincent de Paul briefly served as commander of the abbey from 1610. At this time, the commendatory regime and the war (the first Siege of La Rochelle) already had visible negative consequences. Vicent de Paul resigned from commendatory office in 1616.[6][7]

In 1723, the abbey was mentioned as completely destroyed.[8]

According to Janauschek, the abbey had the order number CCCC (400).[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Janauschek, Leopold (1877). Originum Cisterciensium : in quo, praemissis congregationum domiciliis adjectisque tabulis chronologico-genealogicis, veterum abbatiarum a monachis habitatarum fundationes ad fidem antiquissimorum fontium primus descripsit (in Latin). Vol. I. Vienna. p. 249-250. Retrieved June 27, 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Léonard-des-Chaumes, Saint". cistercensi.info (in Italian). Cistercian Order. Retrieved 27 June 2013.
  3. ^ "Création de Dompierre". dompierresurmer.fr (in French). Dompierre-sur-Mer. Archived from the original on June 13, 2013. Retrieved April 11, 2013.
  4. ^ Barrière, Bernadette (2006). Limousin médiéval. Le temps des créations : occupation du sol, monde laïc, espace cistercien (in French). Limoges: Presses universitaires de Limoges. p. 574. ISBN 9782842873912. Retrieved February 11, 2013.
  5. ^ Bruzen de La Martinière, Antoine Augustin (1768). Le grand dictionnaire géographique et critique (in French). Vol. 5. Paris: Les libraires associés. p. 252. Retrieved February 11, 2013.
  6. ^ Coste, Pierre (1933). Le grand saint du Grand Siècle : Monsieur Vincent (in French). Limoges: Revue d'histoire de l'Église de France. p. 74. Retrieved February 11, 2013.
  7. ^ Ducourneau, Jean-Yves (2003). Saint Vincent de Paul par ses écrits : les pauvres sont nos maîtres (in French). Montréal: Mediaspaul Éditions. p. 17. ISBN 9782712208769. Retrieved February 11, 2013.
  8. ^ Pierre... (November 7, 2012). "1723 – L'abbaye de Saint-Léonard des Chaumes à Dompierre-sur-Mer (Charente-Maritime)". histoirepassion.eu (in French). Histoire passion. Retrieved February 11, 2013.