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AIDA Cruises is an American/British-owned German cruise line based in Rostock, Germany.

AIDA Cruises
Public
IndustryTransportation
Founded1960
HeadquartersRostock, Germany
ProductsCruises
OwnerCarnival Corporation & plc Edit this on Wikidata
Websitehttp://www.aida.de/

HistoryEdit

The company was founded as Deutsche Seereederei (German Shipping Company) with a ship called Völkerfreundschaft ("Peoples' Friendship"), and entered the cruise industry in the 1960s.[1]

After the reunification of Germany in the early 1990s Deutsche Seereederei was privatised and became DSR. DSR acquired Seetours of Bremen and cruises were marketed under the Seetours brand.[1]

In 2001, P&O Princess Cruises acquired the remaining 49% interest in the company.[2] In 2003, P&O Princess merged with Carnival Corporation, to form Carnival Corporation & plc, the worlds largest cruise holiday company.[3] Seetours was rebranded as AIDA Cruises in 2004.[4]

Following the merger, executive control of AIDA Cruises transferred to Costa Cruises Group, one of the main operating companies of the Carnival Group, with responsibility for the group's European brands.[4][5]

AIDA Cruises is now one of ten brands owned by Carnival Corp, based at Miami, Florida, accounting for 6.5% of its share of revenue[6] and has been led by President Felix Eichhorn since 1 September 2015.[7] AIDA ships cater to the German-speaking market. As seagoing "club resorts", AIDA ships have on-board amenities and facilities designed to attract younger, more active vacationers.[8]

In October 2017, AIDAcara departed from Hamburg on the company's first round-the-world cruise. After a 116-day sailing, the ship returned to Hamburg on 10 February 2018.[9] The ship visited Southampton, Lisbon, Madeira, Rio de Janeiro, Ushuaia, Easter Island, Tahiti, Singapore, the Maldives, and many other destinations.[10]

AIDAaura took the company's second World Cruise in fall 2018. On 8 October 2018, the ship departed from Hamburg on a 117-day voyage visiting 41 ports in 20 countries on four continents.[11] During this voyage, AIDAaura became the company's first ship to visit several destinations including South Africa, Namibia, Melbourne, Tasmania, Fiji, Samoa and New Caledonia.[12]

In December 2018, Aida Cruises launched the first cruise ship powered by liquefied natural gas.[13] In August 2019, AIDA signed an agreement with Corvus Energy to install battery storage systems for the electrification of their ships.[14] In October 2019, AIDA announced that it would test a new fuel-cell technology for large-scale cruise ships aboard the AIDAnova as early as 2021.[15]

ShipsEdit

Current fleetEdit

Ship Built Builder Entered Service for AIDA Gross Tonnage Flag Notes Image
AIDAcara 1996 Kvaerner Masa-Yards (Finland) 1996–Present 38,531 tons   Italy Previously AIDA  
AIDAvita 2002 Aker MTW 2002–Present 42,289 tons   Italy  
AIDAaura 2003 Aker MTW 2003–Present 42,289 tons   Italy  
AIDAdiva 2007 Meyer Werft 2007–Present 69,203 tons   Italy  
AIDAbella 2008 Meyer Werft 2008–Present 69,203 tons   Italy  
AIDAluna 2009 Meyer Werft 2009–Present 69,203 tons   Italy  
AIDAblu 2010 Meyer Werft 2010–Present 71,300 tons   Italy The name has been used for a former AIDA ship from 2004–2007.  
AIDAsol 2011 Meyer Werft 2011–Present 71,300 tons   Italy  
AIDAmar 2012 Meyer Werft 2012–Present 71,300 tons   Italy  
AIDAstella 2013 Meyer Werft 2013–Present 71,304 tons   Italy  
AIDAprima 2016 Mitsubishi 2016–Present 125,572 tons   Italy Ship Delivered in March, began Operating April 25[16]  
AIDAperla 2017 Mitsubishi 2017–Present 125,572 tons   Italy Ship Delivered in April, began Operating May 28  
AIDAnova 2018 Meyer Werft 2018-Present 183,900 tons   Italy AIDA's largest ship ever, planned with 6600 passengers.  

Future shipsEdit

Ship Delivery Builder Gross Tonnage Planned flag Notes Image
AIDAmira December 2019 Chantiers de l'Atlantique 48,200 tons   Italy Currently sailing as Costa neoRiviera.
AIDAcosma May 2021 Meyer Werft 183,900 tons   Italy Steel cutting ceremony 15 August 2019
Unnamed 2023 Meyer Werft 183,900 tons   Italy

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Smith, Peter C. (2014). Cruise Ships: The Small-Scale Fleet. Barnsley, S.Yorkshire: Pen & Sword Books Ltd. p. 160. ISBN 1-7815-9281-0.
  2. ^ Alex (29 September 2000). "P&O/Priness First Half 2000 Earnings". www.cruiseindustrynews.com. Retrieved 13 November 2019.
  3. ^ Writer, Tom Stieghorst Business. "P&O'S BOARD OKS CARNIVAL MERGER". Sun-Sentinel.com. Retrieved 13 November 2019.
  4. ^ a b "Seetours re-brands as Aida Cruises". FVW. 4 October 2004. Archived from the original on 31 October 2019. Retrieved 7 December 2018.
  5. ^ "Costa Cruises, company profile". Archived from the original on 9 April 2010. Retrieved 13 November 2019.
  6. ^ "2012 World Wide Market Share". Cruise Market Watch. 20 November 2011.
  7. ^ Satchell, Arlene. "Carnival Corp. taps Felix Eichhorn to lead German brand AIDA Cruises". sun-sentinel.com. Retrieved 13 November 2019.
  8. ^ Design 07, ShipPax Information ISSN 1403-3437
  9. ^ Staff, CIN (12 February 2018). "AIDAcara Returns to Hamburg Following World Cruise". Retrieved 13 February 2018.
  10. ^ Tore, Iuliia. "AIDA's first world cruise launched from Hamburg | Rus Tourism News". www.rustourismnews.com. Retrieved 15 February 2018.
  11. ^ Staff, CIN (21 July 2017). "AIDAaura Set for 2018 World Cruise". Retrieved 15 February 2018.
  12. ^ Kalosh, Anne. "AIDA charts new destinations in second world voyage". Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  13. ^ "Carnival's AIDA Cruises to test fuel cell technology". Ship Technology. 14 October 2019. Retrieved 13 November 2019.
  14. ^ "AIDA Cruises Plans Fleet Electrification". The Maritime Executive. Retrieved 30 October 2019.
  15. ^ "Carnival's AIDA Cruises Pioneering the Industry's First Fuel-Cell Technology". TravelPulse. Retrieved 30 October 2019.
  16. ^ "AIDAprima in Singapore – Cruise Industry News | Cruise News". www.cruiseindustrynews.com. Retrieved 21 April 2016.

External linksEdit