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The Autoroute A40 is a motorway in France that extends from Mâcon on the west to Passy on the east, terminating not far from Chamonix and the Mont Blanc Tunnel. The road runs 208 kilometres (129 mi) through Bresse, the high southern Jura Mountains, northern Prealps and French Alps. It was fully completed in 1990, and includes 12 viaducts and 3 tunnels. The road is maintained by Autoroutes Paris-Rhin-Rhône (APRR and ATMB), comprising part of European routes E25 and E62.[1]

A40 autoroute shield

A40 autoroute
Autoroute des Titans
Autoroute Blanche
Route information
Part of
Maintained by ATMB
Length 205.9 km (127.9 mi)
Existed 1973 – present
Major junctions
West end AB-Kreuz.svg E 15 / A 6 at Mâcon
 

AB-AS.svg 1 D 906
AB-AS.svg 2 D 68 / D 68B / D 933
AB-AS.svg 3 D 1079 / D 1179
AB-Kreuz.svg E 62 / A 406
AB-AS.svg 4 D 47 / D 1079
AB-AS.svg 5 D 92 / D 975 / D 1479
AB-Kreuz.svg A 39
AB-AS.svg 6 D 52F / D 1083
AB-AS.svg 7 D 1075
AB-Kreuz.svg E 611 / A 42
AB-AS.svg 8 Saint Martin du Fresne A 404 / D 12 / D 31 / D 1084
AB-AS.svg 9 D 1084
AB-AS.svg 10 Bellegarde D 101
AB-AS.svg 11 D 14 / D 908A / D 1508
AB-AS.svg 13 A 41 / D 1201
AB-AS.svg 13.1 D 18 / D 18B / D 318 / D 1206
AB-AS.svg 14 A 411 / D 2 / D 906A / D 1206
AB-AS.svg 15 La Valée Verte D 903
AB-Kreuz.svg E 712 / A 410
AB-AS.svg 16 Bonneville D 19 / D 1203
AB-AS.svg 17 D 19 / D 1205
AB-AS.svg 18 D 304 / D 1205
AB-AS.svg 19 D 1205
AB-AS.svg 20 D 2105

AB-AS.svg 21 D 39 / D 339
East end AB-AS.svg N 205 / D 43 / D 902 / D 1205 at Passy
Highway system
Autoroutes of France

Contents

NomenclatureEdit

Autoroute A40 is named Autoroute des Titans ("Highway of the Titans") for the dramatic engineering construction through the mountainous sections between Bourg-en-Bresse and Bellegarde-sur-Valserine, and as Autoroute Blanche ("the White Highway") through the snow-laden Jura and Alps between Bellegarde-sur-Valserine and Annemasse on the Swiss border.

 
The Nantua viaduct on the "Highway of the Titans" of Autoroute A40

HistoryEdit

ATMBEdit

  • 1973 : The section between Vallard and Bonneville was opened.
  • 1974 : The section between Bonneville and Cluses was opened.
  • 1975 : The section between Cluses and Sallanches was opened.
  • 1976 : The section between Sallanches-Passy was opened in a ceremony presided over by Prime Minister Jacques Chirac.
  • 1982 : The 50 kilometre section between Bellegarde and Annemasse is opened.

These sections were previously numbered B41.

APRREdit

  • 1985 : Section between Bourg-Nord and -Bourg-Sud (20 km) completed.
  • 1986 : Opening of section between Bourg-Sud and Sylans (Nantua) (61 km). The French President, François Mitterrand opened the motorway giving it the name L'Autoroute des Titans.
  • 1987 : Opening of the section Mâcon to Bourg-Nord (27 km)
  • 1989 : Opening of the section Sylans to Châtillon-en-Michaille (13 km)
  • 1990 : Opening of the junction between the A6 autoroute and the A40 (3 km)
  • 1995 : Widening of the Chamoise Tunnel and viaduct at Nantua and Neyrolles

The western section between the A6 and A42 was originally given the number F42. The whole road was re-numbered the A40 including a short section where the road merges with the A42.

CharacteristicsEdit

The autoroute is made up of two lanes for each traffic direction except between its junctions with the A42 and A39 (21 km) where there are three lanes on each side.

JunctionsEdit

  •  Exchange A6-A40) Motorway starts at junction with A6 to Paris (north), Lyon (south)
  •  01 (Mâcon-centre) km 2 Towns served: Mâcon
  •  02 (Feillens) km 5 Towns served: Pont-de-Vaux
  •  03 (Pont-de-Veyle)km 8 Towns served:
  •  Exchange A406-A40 Junction with A406 (under construction) to
    •  Rest Area: L'Étang Quinard (eastbound), Saint-André de Bagé (westbound)
  •  04 (Vonnas) km 18 Towns served: Saint-Cyr-sur-Menthon, RN79
  •  05 (Bourg-Nord) km 30 Towns served: Bourg-en-Bresse
  •  Exchange A39-A40 Junction with A39 to Dole (north)
  •  06 (Lons-le-Saunier/Étienne-du-Bresse) km 39 Towns served: RN83, Bourg-en-Bresse
    •  Service Area: Aire de Bourg
  •  07 (Bourg-Sud) km 50 Towns served: RN75, Bourg-en-Bresse
    •  Rest Area: Certines (eastbound), Tossiat (westbound)
  •  Exchange A42-A40 Junction with the A42 to Lyon (south)
    •  Rest Area: Neuville-sur-Ain (westbound)
    •  Service area: Ceignes-Cerdon (westbound)
    •  Rest Area: Ceignes-Haut-Bugey (westbound)
  •  08 (Nantua St-Martin du Fresne) km 81 Towns served: St Martin du Fresne
  •  Exchange A404-A40 Junction with the A404 to Oyonnax
  •  09 (Nantua les Neyrolles) km 90 Towns served: Nantua
    •  Rest area: Le Lac (eastbound), Les Neyrolles de Bagé (eastbound)
    •  Rest Area: La Michaille (westbound), La Semine (westbound)
  •  10 (Bellegarde) km 106 Towns served: Bellegarde-sur-Valserine
  •  11 (Frangy Seyssel) km 115 Towns served:RN508, Frangy
    •  Service Area: Aire de Valleiry
  •  Péage de Viry
  •  13 (Saint-Julien) km 136 Towns served: Saint-Julien-en-Genevois
  •  Exchange A41-A40-A401 Junction with the A41 (proposed) and A401 spur to Geneva (Switzerland)
  •  13.1 (Parc d'Affaire Internationale) km 138 Towns served: Archamps
    •  Rest Area: Télégraphe de Salève
  •  14 (Annemasse) km 152 Towns served: Geneva (Switzerland) via spur A411. Annemasse
  •  Péage de Nangy
  •  15 (Boëge/Vallee Verte) km 161 Towns served: RN503 to Thonon-les-Bains
  •  Exchange A410-A40 Junction with the A410 to Annecy.
  •  16 (Bonneville-Ouest) km 170 Towns served: Bonneville
    •  Service Area: Aire de Bonneville
  •  17 (Bonneville-Est) km 174 Towns served: Bonneville
  •  18 (Cluses-Ouest) km 183 Towns served: Cluses
  •  19 (Cluses-Centre) km 188 Towns served: Cluses
  •  Péage de Cluses
  •  20 (Sallanches) km 198 Towns served: Sallanches
    •  Rest Area: Passy (westbound)
  •  21 (Passy Chedde) km 206 Towns served: Megève, Saint-Gervais-les-Bains
  •  22 (Passy) km 208 the autoaint-Gervaisroute ends becoming the RN205 towards Chamonix and Turin (Italy)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "RN205: Between the Autoroute Blanche and the Mont Blanc Tunnel". ATMB. Archived from the original on 6 August 2012. Retrieved 16 July 2012. 

External linksEdit

Route map: Google

KML is from Wikidata