86th Street station (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)

86th Street is an express station on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. Located at the intersection of Lexington Avenue and 86th Street on the Upper East Side, it is served by the 4 and 6 trains at all times, the 5 train at all times except late nights, and the <6> train during weekdays in peak direction.

 86 Street
 "4" train"5" train"6" train"6" express train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
86th Street IRT 003.JPG
Downtown local platform
Station statistics
AddressEast 86th Street & Lexington Avenue
New York, NY 10028[1]
BoroughManhattan
LocaleUpper East Side
Coordinates40°46′46″N 73°57′20″W / 40.779469°N 73.955626°W / 40.779469; -73.955626Coordinates: 40°46′46″N 73°57′20″W / 40.779469°N 73.955626°W / 40.779469; -73.955626
DivisionA (IRT)[2]
Line   IRT Lexington Avenue Line
Services   4 all times (all times)
   5 all times except late nights (all times except late nights)
   6 all times (all times) <6> weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction (weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction)
TransitBus transport NYCT Bus: M86 SBS, M98, M101, M102, M103
Bus transport MTA Bus: BxM1[3]
StructureUnderground
Levels2
Platforms4 side platforms (2 on each level)
Tracks4 (2 on each level)
Other information
OpenedJuly 17, 1918 (103 years ago) (1918-07-17)[4]
Station code397[5]
AccessibleThis station is partially compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 Partially ADA-accessible; accessibility to rest of station planned (Elevator for uptown local platform only)
Opposite-
direction
transfer
No
Traffic
201913,537,308[6]Increase 0.4%
Rank21 out of 424[6]
Station succession
Next north125th Street (express): 4 all except late nights5 all except late nights
96th Street (local): 4 late nights6 all times <6> weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
Next south77th Street (local): 4 late nights6 all times <6> weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
59th Street (express): 4 all except late nights5 all except late nights
Location
86th Street station (IRT Lexington Avenue Line) is located in New York City Subway
86th Street station (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)
86th Street station (IRT Lexington Avenue Line) is located in New York City
86th Street station (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)
86th Street station (IRT Lexington Avenue Line) is located in New York
86th Street station (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)
Track layout

Upper level
Lower level
Street map

Station service legend
Symbol Description
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times except late nights
Stops all times Stops all times
Stops late nights only Stops late nights only
Stops rush hours in peak direction only Stops rush hours in the peak direction only
86th Street Subway Station (Dual System IRT)
MPSNew York City Subway System MPS
NRHP reference No.05000236[7]
Added to NRHPMarch 30, 2005

The 86th Street station was constructed for the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) as part of the Dual Contracts. The station opened on July 17, 1918, as part of the IRT's Lexington Avenue and Jerome Avenue lines from Grand Central–42nd Street to 167th Street. The station's platforms were extended in the early 1960s. It was also renovated in the 1970s, in 1986, and from 2002 to 2004.

The 86th Street station contains four side platforms and four tracks, split across two levels. Local trains use the upper level, which has two tracks and two side platforms, while express trains use the lower level, which are arranged in the same layout. The station was built with tile and mosaic decorations. The upper platforms contain exits to Lexington Avenue and 86th Street, as well as stairs to and from the lower platforms. Unlike at most express stations, the respective pairs of northbound and southbound platforms are not connected to each other within fare control. The station interior is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

HistoryEdit

Construction and openingEdit

Following the completion of the original subway, there were plans to construct a line along Manhattan's east side north of 42nd Street. The original plan for what became the extension north of 42nd Street was to continue it south through Irving Place and into what is now the BMT Broadway Line at Ninth Street and Broadway. In July 1911, the IRT had withdrawn from the talks, and the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company (BRT) was to operate on Lexington Avenue. The IRT submitted an offer for what became its portion of the Dual Contracts on February 27, 1912.[8][9]

In 1913, as part of the Dual Contracts, which were signed on March 19, 1913,[10] the Public Service Commission planned to split the original Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) system from looking like a "Z" system (as seen on a map) to an "H"-shaped system. The original system would be split into three segments: two north–south lines, carrying through trains over the Lexington Avenue and Broadway–Seventh Avenue Lines, and a west–east shuttle under 42nd Street. This would form a roughly "H"-shaped system.[11][12] It was predicted that the subway extension would lead to the growth of the Upper East Side and the Bronx.[13][14]

86th Street station opened on July 17, 1918, with service initially running between Grand Central–42nd Street and 167th Street via the line's local tracks.[4] On August 1, the "H system" was put into place, with through service beginning on the new east and west side trunk lines, and the institution of the 42nd Street Shuttle along the old connection between the sides. The station's lower level opened on this date with the inauguration of express service.[15] The cost of the extension from Grand Central was $58 million.[16]

Station renovationsEdit

In late 1959, contracts were awarded to extend the platforms at Bowling Green, Wall Street, Fulton Street, Canal Street, Spring Street, Bleecker Street, Astor Place, Grand Central, 86th Street and 125th Street to 525 feet (160 m) to accommodate ten-car trains.[17]

In 1970, with the construction of a Gimbels department store directly above, Gimbels agreed to renovate the station's entrances.[18] For over a year, community members had asked Gimbels to include an entrance into the store's basement from the subway.[19] While the renovation took place mostly in the fare control areas, work was also done to fix the station's lighting, walls, floors, turnstiles, stairways, and token booths. The Gimbels store opened in 1972.[20] The renovation project cost $405,000.[21]

The station was renovated again in 1986 as part of a move to prevent the existing New York City Subway stations from falling apart after years of deferred maintenance. This was evidenced by the addition of the then standard orange platform edge in addition to the yellow platform edge that was originally there. The I-beams were painted red instead of the original blue and the other parts of the station were fixed.[22]

This station was renovated in 2003, along with the 77th Street and 116th Street stations on the Lexington Avenue Line. As part of the project, structural deficiencies were repaired, signage and lighting were enhanced, electrical service was upgraded, station facilities were rehabilitated, new fare arrays and a new token booth were installed, and portions of the station were upgraded to be compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. In addition, visual clutter was eliminated, and artwork was installed. The contract for the station renovation project, which was expected to take two year, was expected to be advertised in October 2000.[23] The contract for these three stations was awarded in October 2001, and the projects were done in-house. The cost of the work at 86th Street station was $27.3 million, of which $20.3 million came from the Federal government.[24]

In fall 2004, the station renovation project was completed.[25] It consisted of repainting the I-beams from red to dark blue, as well as the removal of train arrival devices on the upper level that gave notices of approaching express trains on the lower level, among other things; the latter was replaced with countdown clocks, on both levels, which performed the same function.[26][27]

This station was added to the National Register of Historic Places on March 30, 2005.[28]

Station layoutEdit

G Street level Exit/entrance
B1 Fare control for northbound platforms
  Elevator at northeast corner of 86th Street and Lexington Avenue for northbound     trains only
Side platform  
Northbound local    toward Pelham Bay Park or Parkchester (96th Street)
  toward Woodlawn late nights (96th Street)
Southbound local    toward Brooklyn Bridge (77th Street)
  toward New Lots Avenue late nights (77th Street)
Side platform
Fare control for southbound platforms
B2 Side platform
Northbound express   toward Woodlawn (125th Street)
  toward Dyre Avenue or Nereid Avenue (125th Street)
Southbound express   toward Utica Avenue (59th Street)
  toward Flatbush Avenue weekdays, Bowling Green evenings/weekends (59th Street)
Side platform

This underground station has two levels, each with two tracks and two side platforms. Each platform is 525 feet (160 m) long and up to 14 feet (4.3 m) wide.[7]: 3–4  The upper level serves local trains while the lower level, located approximately 48 feet (15 m) below ground, serves express trains.[29][30] The 4 and 6 stop here at all times, and the 5 stops here at all times except late nights.[31][32][33] There is no express service during late nights and the lower level is closed during that period.[29] On each side, four staircases connect the levels: two each near the center of either platform and one each toward the northern and southern ends.[7]: 4  There are no crossovers or crossunders between the platforms, making this one of only two express stations in the system where free transfers between opposite directions are not possible (the other is Bergen Street, whose lower level is closed, on the IND Culver Line).

Because the Dual Contracts specified that the street surfaces needed to remain intact during the system's construction, a temporary web of timber supports was erected to support the streets overhead while the platforms were being constructed. The tunnel is covered by a "U"-shaped trough that contains utility pipes and wires. The outer walls of this trough are composed of columns, spaced approximately every 5 feet (1.5 m) with concrete infill between them. There is a 1-inch (25 mm) gap between the tunnel wall and the trackside wall, which is made of 4-inch (100 mm)-thick brick covered over by a tiled finish. Additional columns between the tracks, spaced every 5 feet (1.5 m), support the jack-arched concrete station roofs.[7]: 3  Teal columns run along all four platforms at regular intervals.[34]

The walls along all four platforms are clad with white ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles were installed during the early-2000s renovation and are raised about 14 inch (6.4 mm) from the original layer of tile. At the top of each wall is a colored mosaic frieze consisting mostly of yellows and browns.[7]: 4  Small "86" tablets in a circle run along this frieze.[7]: 4 [35] The name tablets have "86TH STREET" in a white serif font on a reddish-brown background with a buff-colored inner border and green outer border.[7]: 4 [36] Similar tile signs reading "DOWNTOWN TRAINS" and "UPTOWN TRAINS", accompanied by white arrows, are on the walls.[7]: 4  At the extreme southern ends of all four platforms, there are tan terracotta blocks and a darker trim line with "86TH ST" written on it in white sans serif font at regular intervals.[7]: 5 

Name tablet
Trim line tablet

Each upper-level platform has one same-level fare control area in the center. The southbound side has a turnstile bank and token booth. The northbound fare control has an unstaffed turnstile bank.[7]: 5 

The 2004 artwork here is called Happy City by Peter Sis. It consists of four different glass and etched stone mosaic murals in the shapes of huge eyes surrounded by various animals and objects. They are located at each stop of the four staircases near the fare control areas that go down to the lower level express platforms.[37]

ExitsEdit

This station has separate entrances for the northbound and southbound platforms. All of the entrances are at the intersection of Lexington Avenue and 86th Street.[7]: 5 [38]

From the southbound fare control, two staircases go up to the southwest corner of East 86th Street and Lexington Avenue, and two more that are built inside a Best Buy store on the northwest corner of the same intersection.[39]

From the northbound fare control, there is an unstaffed turnstile bank and two staircases going up to the southeast corner of East 86th Street and Lexington Avenue. An additional staircase and an elevator rise to the northeast corner. The elevator and staircase replace two narrow staircases formerly located inside a now-demolished shopping arcade at that corner. The elevator and staircase installations are part of the construction of a luxury residential tower at 147 East 86th Street.[40][41] As of 2019, only the northbound local platform is ADA-accessible, since there is no elevator from the local platform to the express platform and no elevators on the southbound side. Accessibility of the entire station was proposed in August 2019 as part of the MTA's "Fast Forward" program.[42]

Notable places nearbyEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Borough of Manhattan, New York City". Government of New York City. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  2. ^ "Glossary". Second Avenue Subway Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (SDEIS) (PDF). 1. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. March 4, 2003. pp. 1–2. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 26, 2021. Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  3. ^ "Manhattan Bus Map" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 2019. Retrieved December 1, 2020.
  4. ^ a b "Lexington Av. Line to be Opened Today" (PDF). The New York Times. July 17, 1918. p. 13. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 21, 2020.
  5. ^ "Station Developers' Information". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  6. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2014–2019". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "New York MPS 86th Street Subway Station (Dual System IRT)". Records of the National Park Service, 1785 – 2006, Series: National Register of Historic Places and National Historic Landmarks Program Records, 2013 – 2017, Box: National Register of Historic Places and National Historic Landmarks Program Records: New York, ID: 75313893. National Archives.
  8. ^ Walker, James Blaine (1918). Fifty Years of Rapid Transit — 1864 to 1917. New York, N.Y.: Law Printing. pp. 230–233. Retrieved November 6, 2016.
  9. ^ "Petition for Subway in Lexington Ave". The New York Times. May 22, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 16, 2009. A petition is being circulated among the residents and property owners of the section just south of the Grand Central Station, in Park and Lexington Avenues, protesting against the proposed abandonment of the construction of the Subway in Lexington Avenue, between Forty-third and Thirty-second Streets.
  10. ^ "Subway Contracts Solemnly Signed; Cheers at the Ceremonial Function When McCall Gets Willcox to Attest" (PDF). The New York Times. March 20, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2018.
  11. ^ "Money Set Aside For New Subways; Board of Estimate Approves City Contracts to be Signed To-day with Interboro and B.R.T." (PDF). The New York Times. March 19, 1913. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 10, 2017.
  12. ^ Engineering News-record. McGraw-Hill Publishing Company. 1916. p. 846.
  13. ^ Whitney, Travis H. (March 10, 1918). "The Seventh and Lexington Avenue Subways Will Revive Dormant Sections — Change in Operation That Will Transform Original Four-Tracked Subway Into Two Four-Tracked Systems and Double Present Capacity of the Interborough". The New York Times. p. 12. Retrieved August 26, 2016.
  14. ^ "Public Service Commission Fixes July 15 For Opening of The New Seventh and Lexington Avenue Subway Lines — Will Afford Better Service and Less Crowding — Shuttle Service for Forty-Second Street — How the Various Lines of the Dual System Are Grouped for Operation and List of Stations on All Lines". The New York Times. May 19, 1918. p. 32. Retrieved November 6, 2016.
  15. ^ "Open New Subway Lines to Traffic; Called a Triumph — Great H System Put in Operation Marks an Era in Railroad Construction — No Hitch in the Plans — But Public Gropes Blindly to Find the Way in Maze of New Stations — Thousands Go Astray — Leaders in City's Life Hail Accomplishment of Great Task at Meeting at the Astor". The New York Times. August 2, 1918. p. 1. Retrieved November 6, 2016.
  16. ^ "Finish a New Link of the Dual Subway; Lexington Avenue Line North of Forty-second Street to Begin Local Service Wednesday. Branch Extends to Bronx Through service, with Times SquareGrand Central Shuttle Connections, to Open Soon. Changes in the Bronx". The New York Times. July 11, 1918. p. 20. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2017.
  17. ^ Annual Report For The Year Ending June 30, 1959 (PDF). New York City Transit Authority. 1959. p. 9.
  18. ^ Schumach, Murray (July 29, 1970). "Gimbels Will Build Entrances To Subway at Yorkville Store". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved July 29, 2021.
  19. ^ "GIMBELS IS URGED TO HELP SUBWAY; 86th St. Group Calls on Store to Meet Traffic Needs". The New York Times. August 17, 1969. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved July 29, 2021.
  20. ^ Corry, John (February 25, 1972). "Gimbels East Officially in Business". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved July 29, 2021.
  21. ^ "City Announces Plan For the Improvement Of Subway Stations". The New York Times. March 14, 1979. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved July 29, 2021.
  22. ^ Oszustowicz, Eric (November 8, 1987). "View of the downtown express platform". nycsubway.org. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  23. ^ "Forecast of MTA Capital Program Contracts July - December 2000". mta.nyc.ny.us. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 2000. Archived from the original on August 16, 2000. Retrieved July 29, 2021.
  24. ^ "Contract Capers: Excess Costs and Politics in MTA Contracting" (PDF). ppfeny.org. Public Policy and Education Fund of New York. December 12, 2002. p. 11, 13. Retrieved July 29, 2021.
  25. ^ Jeremiah Cox. "86 Street (4,5,6) - The SubwayNut". subwaynut.com. Archived from the original on November 6, 2018. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  26. ^ "Learn More about Countdown Clocks..." mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved October 31, 2011.
  27. ^ "Countdown Clocks Station List". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved October 31, 2011.
  28. ^ "National Register of Historical Places - NEW YORK (NY), New York County". www.nationalregisterofhistoricplaces.com. Retrieved August 4, 2017.
  29. ^ a b Dougherty, Peter (2006) [2002]. Tracks of the New York City Subway 2006 (3rd ed.). Dougherty. OCLC 49777633 – via Google Books.
  30. ^ Metropolitan Transportation Authority. "Second Avenue Subway March 2014 Public Workshop Follow-Up Report, page 23" (PDF). Retrieved April 21, 2016.
  31. ^ "4 Subway Timetable, Effective September 13, 2020". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  32. ^ "5 Subway Timetable, Effective September 13, 2020". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  33. ^ "6 Subway Timetable, Effective September 13, 2020". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  34. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (August 15, 2008). "Passengers get off a downtown 6 train". subwaynut.com. Retrieved August 4, 2017.
  35. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (August 15, 2008). "Close-up of 86 in the trimline". subwaynut.com. Retrieved August 4, 2017.
  36. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (August 12, 2011). "A name tablet". subwaynut.com. Retrieved August 4, 2017.
  37. ^ "NYCT Permanent Art". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved August 4, 2017.
  38. ^ a b c d e f g h i "86th Street Neighborhood Map". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. April 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  39. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (August 12, 2011). "One of the entrances inside the storefront of Best Buy". subwaynut.com. Archived from the original on March 14, 2016. Retrieved August 4, 2017.
  40. ^ Zimmer, Amy (March 21, 2016). "MTA's Deal With Developer to Alter 86th St. Subway Station Angers Locals". DNAinfo New York. Archived from the original on May 16, 2018. Retrieved May 16, 2018.
  41. ^ Weaver, Shaye (June 16, 2017). "Developer to Create 'Obstacle Course' With New UES Subway Entrances: Locals". DNAinfo New York. Archived from the original on May 16, 2018. Retrieved May 16, 2018.
  42. ^ Berger, Paul. "MTA Has a Target List of Accessible Stations but Stalls Release". WSJ. Retrieved August 2, 2019.

External linksEdit