82-BM-37

The M-37 or 82-BM-37 (батальонный миномёт) is a Soviet 82 millimeter calibre mortar designed by B.I. Szayrin and accepted into service in 1937. The design of the M-37 is based on the earlier French Brandt mle 27/31 mortar with Russian modifications.[5] The main difference between the 82-PM-37 and the earlier 82-PM-36 was the adoption of a round base-plate, revised traverse/elevation controls, simplified sights and spring-loaded shock absorbers on the bi-pod to reduce the amount of relaying needed between shots.[6] The German designation for captured M-37 mortars was 8.2 cm GrW 274/2(r).[7]

82mm M1937 Battalion Mortar
Zagan 82 mm moździerz wz 37.jpg
TypeInfantry mortar
Place of originSoviet Union
Service history
Used bySoviet Union
WarsWorld War II
Korean War[1]
Vietnam War
Uganda-Tanzania War[2]
Afghan Wars[3]
Gulf War
Syrian Civil War
War in Donbass[4]
Specifications
Mass56 kilograms (123 lb)
Barrel length1.22 metres (4 ft)

Shell3.05 kg (6 lb 12 oz)
Caliber82 millimetres (3.2 in)
Elevation+45° to +75°
Traverse6° to 15°
Rate of fire25–30 rpm
Muzzle velocity211 m/s (690 ft/s)
Maximum firing range3,040 m (3,320 yd)

The M-37M is an improved version with lighter base plate and a device to prevent double loading.[8]

It was produced in China by Norinco as the Type 53,[9] in Egypt by the Helwan Machine Tools Company as the Model 69 and in Bulgaria by Arsenal as the M-82 Mod 1937.[6]

OperatorsEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Rottman, Gordon L. (December 2002). Korean War Order of Battle: United States, United Nations, and Communist Ground, Naval, and Air Forces, 1950-1953. Praeger. p. 198. ISBN 978-0-275-97835-8. Archived from the original on 9 December 2018. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  2. ^ "WWII weapons in Tanzania". 24 November 2017. Archived from the original on 20 December 2017. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  3. ^ Isby, David C. (1990). The War in Afghanistan 1979-1989: The Soviet Empire at High Tide. Concord Publications. p. 8. ISBN 978-9623610094.
  4. ^ a b Ferguson, Jonathan; Jenzen-Jones, N.R. (November 2014). Raising Red Flags: An Examination of Arms & Munitions in the Ongoing Conflict in Ukraine, 2014 (PDF). Research Report 3. Armament Research Services. p. 50. ISBN 978-0-9924624-3-7. Archived (PDF) from the original on 1 December 2014. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  5. ^ Bishop, Chris, The Encyclopedia of Weapons of World War II, Sterling Publishing Company, Inc. (2002), ISBN 1-58663-762-2, p. 192
  6. ^ a b c d "82 mm M-37 mortar". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2002-2003. 2001. pp. 3692–3693.
  7. ^ Chamberlain, Peter (1975). Mortars and rockets. Gander, Terry. New York: Arco Pub. Co. p. 29. ISBN 0668038179. OCLC 2067459.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "82 mm 'new' M-37 mortar". Jane's Infantry Weapons 1994-1995. 1994. pp. 1411–1412.
  9. ^ a b c d "82 mm Type 53 mortar". Jane's Infantry Weapons 1992-1993. 1992. p. 1391.
  10. ^ Bhatia, Michael Vinai; Sedra, Mark (May 2008). Small Arms Survey (ed.). Afghanistan, Arms and Conflict: Armed Groups, Disarmament and Security in a Post-War Society. Routledge. p. 66. ISBN 978-0-415-45308-0. Archived from the original on 1 September 2018. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  11. ^ Letter dated 26 June 2014 from the Panel of Experts on the Central African Republic established pursuant to Security Council resolution 2127 (2013) addressed to the President of the Security Council (PDF). 1 July 2014. p. 81. Archived (PDF) from the original on 29 March 2017. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  12. ^ "National inventories, Equatorial Guinea". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. 2000. p. 1645.
  13. ^ "United Nations Register of Conventional Arms: Report of the Secretary-General" (PDF). New York: United Nations. 14 July 2016. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 October 2016. Retrieved 4 October 2016.
  14. ^ Rottman, Gordon L. (1993). Armies of the Gulf War. Elite 45. Osprey Publishing. p. 49. ISBN 9781855322776.
  15. ^ Small Arms Survey (2012). "Blue Skies and Dark Clouds: Kazakhstan and Small Arms". Small Arms Survey 2012: Moving Targets. Cambridge University Press. p. 131. ISBN 978-0-521-19714-4. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 August 2018. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  16. ^ US Department of Defense. "82mm M-37 mortar". North Korea Country Handbook 1997, Appendix A: Equipment Recognition (PDF). p. A-90. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  17. ^ Ross, Russell, ed. (1987). Cambodia, a Country Study. Area Handbook Series (Third ed.). Washington, D.C.: Department of the Army, American University. p. 313. ISBN 978-0160208386.
  18. ^ "National inventories, Libya". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. 2000. p. 3091.
  19. ^ "National inventories, Madagascar". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. 2000. p. 3094.
  20. ^ "National inventories, Morocco". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. 2000. p. 3111.
  21. ^ "National inventories, Poland". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. 2000. p. 3347.
  22. ^ "National inventories, Romania". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. 2000. p. 3435.
  23. ^ "National inventories, Russian Federation and Associated States (CIS)". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. 2000. p. 3845.
  24. ^ "National inventories, Sudan". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. 2000. p. 4570.
  25. ^ "National inventories, Togo". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. 2000. p. 4275.
  26. ^ Rottman, Gordon L. (8 May 2005). Khe Sanh 1967–68: Marines battle for Vietnam’s vital hilltop base. Campaign 150. Osprey Publishing. p. 44. ISBN 9781841768632.
  27. ^ Rottman, Gordon L. (10 February 2009). North Vietnamese Army Soldier 1958–75. Warrior 135. Osprey Publishing. p. 32. ISBN 9781846033711.