The 810s decade ran from January 1, 810, to December 31, 819.

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
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EventsEdit

810

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

811Edit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
  • Byzantine–Bulgarian War: Emperor Nikephoros I organises a new campaign against the Bulgarian Empire, gathering an expeditionary force (around 80,000 men) from all parts of the empire. He is accompanied by high-ranking officials and aristocrats, including his son Stauracius and brother-in-law Michael I Rangabe[4] (both later emperors temporarily). Krum, ruler (khan) of Bulgaria, sends envoys to sue for peace. Nikephoros refuses to accept the terms and marches through the Balkan passes towards Pliska, the Bulgarian capital.
  • July 23 – Nikephoros I reaches Pliska, and destroys a Bulgarian army of 12,000 elite soldiers who guard the stronghold. Another hastily assembled relief force of 50,000 soldiers suffers a similar fate.[5] The Byzantines capture the defenseless capital. Nikephoros plunders the city and captures Krum's treasury.[6] He burns the countryside, slaughters sheep and pigs, as he pursues the retreating Bulgars south-west towards Serdica (modern-day Sofia).[7]
  • July 26Battle of Vărbitsa Pass: Nikephoros I is trapped (probably in the Vărbitsa Pass) and defeated by the Bulgars, who use the tactics of ambush and surprise night attacks to immobilize the Byzantine forces. Nikephoros himself is killed; Krum has the emperor's head carried back in triumph on a pole, where it is cleaned out, lined with silver and made into a jeweled skull cup, which he allows his Slavic princes (archons) to drink from with him.[8]
  • Stauracius is installed as emperor at Adrianople (the first time a Byzantine emperor is crowned outside Constantinople). Because of a sword wound near his neck (during the Battle of Pliska), Stauracius is paralyzed. The imperial court is split between the noble factions of his wife Theophano and his sister Prokopia.[9]
  • October 2 – Michael I is declared emperor of the Byzantine Empire; Stauracius is forced by senior officials to retire to a monastery.[10]
EuropeEdit
Abbasid CaliphateEdit

812Edit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
BritainEdit
Abbasid CaliphateEdit
ChinaEdit

813Edit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
Abbasid CaliphateEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

814Edit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
JapanEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

815Edit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
BritainEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

816Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
BritainEdit
Abbasid CaliphateEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

817Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
North AfricaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

818Edit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
BritainEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit
  • Theodulf, bishop of Orléans, is deposed and imprisoned, after becoming involved in a conspiracy with Bernard of Italy.

819Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
Abbasid CaliphateEdit

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

810

811

812

813

814

815

816

817

818

819

DeathsEdit

810

811

812

813

814

815

816

817

818

819


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Notker the Stammerer, De Carolo Magno, Book II, Chapter 13.
  2. ^ Rucquoi, Adeline (1993). Histoire médiévale de la Péninsule ibérique (in French). Paris: Seuil. pp. 443, 86. ISBN 2-02-012935-3.
  3. ^ Coe 1967, 1988, p. 76.
  4. ^ Anonymus Vaticanus, p. 148.
  5. ^ Anonymus Vaticanus, pp. 148-149.
  6. ^ Anastasius Bibliothecarius. Chronographia tripertita, p. 329.
  7. ^ Anonymus Vaticanus, p. 150.
  8. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 97. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  9. ^ Treadgold, p. 429; Bury, p. 17.
  10. ^ Treadgold, p. 429; Finlay, p. 128.
  11. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, pp. 97-98. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  12. ^ Benvenuti, Gino (1985). Le Repubbliche Marinare. Amalfi, Pisa, Genova e Venezia. Rome: Newton & Compton Editori. p. 13. ISBN 88-8289-529-7.
  13. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, pp. 98–99.
  14. ^ Runciman, pp. 64–65[permanent dead link].
  15. ^ Fishbein (1992), pp. 197–202.
  16. ^ Owen Gingerich (1986). "Islamic Astronomy". Scientific American. 254 (4): 74–83. Bibcode:1986SciAm.254d..74G. doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0486-74. JSTOR 24975932.
  17. ^ Nadeau, Jean-Benoît and Barlow, Julie, The Story of French (Alfred A. Knopf 2006), p. 25.
  18. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 99. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  19. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 106. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  20. ^ Swanton, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, pp. 58–59.
  21. ^ Kazhdan, Alexander, ed. (1991), Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium. Oxford University Press, pp. 513–514. ISBN 978-0-19-504652-6.
  22. ^ Salvador Miranda (1998). The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church: Pope Stefano IV (815–817).
  23. ^ Sánchez Albornoz, Claudio; Claudio Sánchez Albornoz. Problems del Reino de Navarra del siglo IX. p. 16.
  24. ^ Islam and Europe Timeline (355–1291 AD).
  25. ^ Wickham, p. 154. In 818 according to the Annales Beneventani.
  26. ^ Dr. Kathryn Tsai. A Timeline of Eastern Church History. Divine Ascent Press, Point Reyes Station, CA, 2004, p. 153.
  27. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 107. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  28. ^ Picard, Christophe (2000). Le Portugal musulman (VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. p. 40. ISBN 2-7068-1398-9.
  29. ^ Rogers, Barbara, Bernhard W. Scholz, and Nithardus. Carolingian Chronicles, Royal Frankish Annals Nithard's Histories. Ann Arbor: Univ. of Michigan, 1972. Print.