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59 (fifty-nine) is the natural number following 58 and preceding 60.

← 58 59 60 →
Cardinalfifty-nine
Ordinal59th
(fifty-ninth)
Factorizationprime
Prime17th
Divisors1, 59
Greek numeralΝΘ´
Roman numeralLIX
Binary1110112
Ternary20123
Quaternary3234
Quinary2145
Senary1356
Octal738
Duodecimal4B12
Hexadecimal3B16
Vigesimal2J20
Base 361N36

Contents

In mathematicsEdit

Fifty-nine is the 17th prime number. The next is sixty-one, with which it comprises a twin prime. 59 is an irregular prime,[1] a safe prime[2] and the 14th supersingular prime.[3] It is an Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part and real part of the form 3n − 1. Since 15! + 1 is divisible by 59 but 59 is not one more than a multiple of 15, 59 is a Pillai prime.[4]

It is also a highly cototient number.[5]

There are 59 stellations of the icosahedron.[6]

59 is one of the factors that divides the smallest composite Euclid number. In this case 59 divides the Euclid number 13# + 1 = 2 × 3 × 5 × 7 × 11 × 13 + 1 = 59 × 509 = 30031.

59 is the highest integer a single symbol may represent in the Sexagesimal system.

In scienceEdit

AstronomyEdit

In musicEdit

In sportsEdit

In other fieldsEdit

Fifty-nine is:

  • The number corresponding to the last minute in a given hour, and the last second in a given minute
  • The number of beads on a Roman Catholic rosary (Dominican).[7]
  • Approximately the number of days in two lunar months
  • The Queensboro Bridge in New York City is also known as the 59th Street Bridge
  • The number on a button commonly worn by feminist activists in the 1970s; this was based on the claim that a woman earned 59 cents to an equally qualified man's dollar
  • Art Project 59's "59 Seconds Video Festival"[8] at 59 Franklin Street, showed 59 videos to 59 different audiences, each 59 seconds long and incorporating the number 59
  • In amateur radio, a perfect signal report
  • The number of the French department Nord
  • The "59-minute rule" is an informal rule in business, whereby (usually near a holiday) employees may be allowed to leave work early, often to beat heavy holiday traffic (the 59 minutes coming from the rule that leaving one full hour early requires the use of leave, whereas leaving 59 minutes early would not)[citation needed][importance?]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Sloane's A000928 : Irregular primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-30.
  2. ^ "Sloane's A005385 : Safe primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-30.
  3. ^ "Sloane's A002267 : The 15 supersingular primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-30.
  4. ^ "Sloane's A063980 : Pillai primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-30.
  5. ^ "Sloane's A100827 : Highly cototient numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-30.
  6. ^ H. S. M. Coxeter, P. Du Val, H. T. Flather, and J. F. Petrie. The Fifty-Nine Icosahedra.
  7. ^ Richard Poe, "Parts of the Rosary", TheChantRosary.com, 2-4-2018
  8. ^ 59 Seconds Video Festival