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49th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 49th Primetime Emmy Awards were held at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in Pasadena, California in 1997. They were presented in two ceremonies hosted by Bryant Gumbel, one on Saturday, September 13 and another on Sunday, September 14. The September 14th ceremony was televised on CBS.

49th Primetime Emmy Awards
Date
  • September 14, 1997
    (Ceremony)
  • September 7, 1997
    (Creative Arts Awards)
Location Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, California
Hosted by Bryant Gumbel
Television/radio coverage
Network CBS
Produced by Darnette Herman
Michael Seligman

Frasier became the first series to win Outstanding Comedy Series four consecutive years, it joined Hill Street Blues which won Outstanding Drama Series four straight years a decade earlier. For the first time since 1979, James Burrows did not receive a Directing nomination, ending his run at 17 consecutive years. Beginning the following year, Burrows would begin a new streak that lasted another six years. In the drama field perennial nominee Law & Order won for its seventh season, the only time a show has won for this specific season.[1]. In winning Law & Order became the first drama series that did not have serialized story arcs[note 1] since Hill Street Blues perfected the formula. Law & Order remains the only non-serialized winner since 1981.

Ratings champion ER also made Emmy history on the night, but not in the way it had hoped. ER came into the ceremony with 17 major nominations, the most on the night and, at that point, second most ever for a comedy or drama series. Unfortunately, the series never heard its name called, going 0/17 in major categories, smashing the record for largest shutout in major categories set by Northern Exposure in 1993, which went 0/11. Fortunately for ER, it did win 3 Creative Arts awards to bring its total output to 3/21, this meant that Northern Exposure still held the title for worst total shutout with an 0/16 tally.

This ceremony marked the end of a 20-year residency for the Primetime Emmy Awards at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium dating back to the 29th Primetime Emmy Awards in 1977 ceremony.

Contents

Winners and nomineesEdit

[2]

ProgramsEdit

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Series Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Special
Outstanding Made for Television Movie Outstanding Miniseries

ActingEdit

Lead performancesEdit

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Special

Supporting performancesEdit

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Special

Guest performancesEdit

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Mel Brooks as Uncle Phil on Mad About You (Episode: "The Penis"), (NBC)
    • Sid Caesar as Harold on Mad About You (Episode: "Citizen Buchman"), (NBC)
    • David Duchovny as Himself on The Larry Sanders Show (Episode: "Everybody Loves Larry"), (HBO)
    • James Earl Jones as Norman on Frasier (Episode: "Roz's Krantz and Gouldenstein are Dead"), (NBC)
    • Jerry Stiller as Frank Costanza on Seinfeld, (NBC)
  • Carol Burnett as Teresa on Mad About You (Episode: "Outbreak"), (NBC)
    • Ellen DeGeneres as Herself on The Larry Sanders Show (Episode: "Ellen, Or Isn't She?"), (HBO)
    • Laura Dern as Susan Richmond on Ellen (Episode: "The Puppy Episode"), (ABC)
    • Marsha Mason as Sherry on Frasier (Episode: "Dad Loves Sherry, The Boys Just Whine"), (NBC)
    • Betty White as Midge Haber on Suddenly Susan (Episode: "Golden Girl Friday"), (NBC)
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series

DirectingEdit

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
  • David Lee, for Frasier (Episode: "To Kill a Talking Bird"), (NBC)
  • Mark Tinker for NYPD Blue (Episode: "Where's 'Swaldo?"), (ABC)
Outstanding Directing for a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries or a Special

WritingEdit

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Writing for a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries or a Special
  • Chris Rock: Bring the Pain, (HBO)
    • Dennis Miller Live, (HBO)
    • Late Night with Conan O'Brien (Episode: "3rd Anniversary Special"), (NBC)
    • Late Show with David Letterman, (CBS)
    • Politically Incorrect, (Comedy Central)
    • Tracey Takes On... (Episode: "Vegas"), (HBO)

Most major nominationsEdit

By network [note 2]
  • NBC – 50
  • HBO – 41
  • CBS – 21
  • ABC – 19
By program
  • ER (NBC) – 17
  • The Larry Sanders Show (HBO) – 12
  • NYPD Blue (ABC) – 8
  • Seinfeld (NBC) – 7
  • Chicago Hope (CBS) / Frasier (NBC) / Mad About You (NBC) / Miss Evers' Boys (HBO) – 6

Most major awardsEdit

By network [note 2]
  • NBC – 11
  • HBO – 7
  • ABC – 6
  • CBS – 2
  • PBS – 2
By program
  • NYPD Blue (ABC) – 4
  • Mad About You (NBC) – 3
Notes
  1. ^ Saying Law & Order had no serialized arcs is potentially misleading. It's true that Law & Order is at its core a procedural, with only very lightly-serialized elements as a general rule. However, in its Emmy-winning season, the show had a three-episode arc—"D-Girl", "Turnaround", and "Showtime"—concerning a high-profile murder case. In addition, the episode "Entrapment" was a sequel to season 3's "Conspiracy" .
  2. ^ a b "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Wiki article".  Retrieved 2017-08-07
  2. ^ "1997 Primetime Emmy Awards". IMDb. Retrieved April 19, 2013. 

External linksEdit