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4-Chloroaniline is an organochlorine compound with the formula ClC6H4NH2. This pale yellow solid is one of the three isomers of chloroaniline.

4-Chloroaniline
4-Chloranilin.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
4-Chloroaniline[1]
Systematic IUPAC name
4-Chlorobenzenamine[1]
Other names
p-Chloroaniline
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.003.093
KEGG
UNII
Properties
ClC6H4NH2
Appearance Pale yellow solid
Density 1.43 g/cm3
Melting point 72.5 °C (162.5 °F; 345.6 K)
Boiling point 232 °C (450 °F; 505 K)
2.6 g/L at 20 °C[2]
Hazards
Main hazards Very toxic, possible carcinogen. Absorbed through skin.[3]
Safety data sheet External MSDS
Flash point 113 °C (235 °F; 386 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

PreparationEdit

4-Chloroaniline is not prepared from aniline, which tends to overchlorinate. Instead, it is prepared by hydrogenation of 4-nitrochlorobenzene, which in turn is prepared by nitration of chlorobenzene.[4]

UsesEdit

4-Chloroaniline is used in the industrial production of pesticides, drugs, and dyestuffs. It is a precursor to the widely used antimicrobial and bacteriocide chlorhexidine and is used in the manufacture of pesticides, including pyraclostrobin, anilofos, monolinuron, and chlorphthalim.[5] 4-Chloroaniline can be also used in the manufacture of some benzodiazepine drugs as well as the antihistamine dorastine, the antiarhythmic lorcainide, and the antifungal ontianil.[citation needed]

4-Chloroaniline is has antimicrobial action against some bacteria and molds.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry : IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book). Cambridge: The Royal Society of Chemistry. 2014. p. 669. doi:10.1039/9781849733069-FP001. ISBN 978-0-85404-182-4.
  2. ^ Scheunert, 1981[full citation needed]
  3. ^ "Safety data for 4-chloroaniline". Oxford University.
  4. ^ a b Gerald Booth (2007). "Nitro Compounds, Aromatic". Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/14356007.a17_411.
  5. ^ Ashford’s Dictionary of Industrial Chemicals (3rd ed.). 2011. p. 1998.