Urania (minor planet designation: 30 Urania) is a large main-belt asteroid that was discovered by English astronomer John Russell Hind on July 22, 1854.[1] It was his last asteroid discovery. This object is named after Urania, the Greek Muse of astronomy. Initial orbital elements for 30 Urania were published by Wilhelm Günther, an assistant at Breslau Observatory.[7] It is orbiting the Sun with a period of 3.64 years and is spinning on its axis once every 13.7 hours.

30 Urania Urania symbol (fixed width).svg
30 Urania VLT (2021), deconvolved.pdf
Discovery[1]
Discovered byJ. R. Hind
Discovery dateJuly 22, 1854
Designations
(30) Urania
Pronunciation/jʊəˈrniə/ yoor-AY-nee-ə[2]
Named after
Urania
1948 JK
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch June 14, 2006 (JD 2453900.5)
Aphelion398.817 Gm (2.666 AU)
Perihelion309.338 Gm (2.068 AU)
354.077 Gm (2.367 AU)
Eccentricity0.126
1,330.017 d (3.64 a)
196.549°
Inclination2.097°
307.820°
86.560°
Physical characteristics
Dimensionsc/a = 0.68±0.05[4]
Mean diameter
88±2 km[4]
100.2±6.8 km (IRAS)[3]
94.48±5.37 km[5]
Mass(1.3±0.9)×1018 kg[4]
(1.74±0.49)×1018 kg[5]
Mean density
3.7±2.7 g/cm3[4]
3.92±1.29 g/cm3[5]
13.686 h (0.5703 d)[6]
0.214 (calculated)[4]
0.1714[3]
S[3]
9.36 (brightest)
7.53[3]

Based upon its spectrum, this is classified as a stony S-type asteroid.[8] During 2000, speckle interferometry measurements from the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo in the Canary Islands were used to measure the apparent size and shape of 30 Urania. This gave cross-sectional dimensions equivalent to an ellipse with a length of 111 km and a width of 89 km, for a ratio of 0.80.[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Numbered Minor Planets 1–5000", Discovery Circumstances, IAU Minor Planet center, retrieved 7 April 2013.
  2. ^ Noah Webster (1884) A Practical Dictionary of the English Language
  3. ^ a b c d e Yeomans, Donald K., "30 Urania", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 9 April 2013.
  4. ^ a b c d e P. Vernazza et al. (2021) VLT/SPHERE imaging survey of the largest main-belt asteroids: Final results and synthesis. Astronomy & Astrophysics 54, A56
  5. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73 (1): 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009. See Table 1.
  6. ^ "EAR Derived Lightcurve Parameters, version 8", Planetary Data System Asteroid/Dust Archive, NASA, retrieved 9 April 2013.
  7. ^ Gunther, W. (December 2012), "Elements and ephemeris of (30) Urania", Astronomical Journal, 4 (85): 103, Bibcode:1855AJ......4..103G, doi:10.1086/100505. See Table 1.
  8. ^ DeMeo, Francesca E.; et al. (July 2009), "An extension of the Bus asteroid taxonomy into the near-infrared" (PDF), Icarus, 202 (1): 160–180, Bibcode:2009Icar..202..160D, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2009.02.005, archived from the original (PDF) on 17 March 2014, retrieved 8 April 2013. See appendix A.
  9. ^ Cellino, A.; et al. (April 2003), "Speckle interferometry observations of asteroids at TNG", Icarus, 162 (2): 278–284, Bibcode:2003Icar..162..278C, CiteSeerX 10.1.1.532.4091, doi:10.1016/S0019-1035(03)00006-X.

External linksEdit