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The 2nd Army (German: 2. Armee Oberkommando) was a World War II field army.

2. Armee
2nd Army
Coat of Arms of the 2nd GE Army II World War.svg
Active1939–45
Country Nazi Germany
BranchArmy
TypeField army
EngagementsWorld War II

Combat ChronicleEdit

The 2nd Army was activated on 20 October 1939, with General Maximilian Reichsfreiherr von Weichs in command. First seeing service in France, the army was involved in the invasion of the Balkans, before offensive operations in Ukraine as part of Operation Barbarossa.

In 1942 the 2. Armee covered the northern wing of Case Blue Fall Blau operating in the surroundings of Voronezh and suffered a major defeat during the Voronezh-Kastornensk operation the Soviet winter offensive that followed the battle of Stalingrad.

In 1945 the army was renamed Army East Prussia (AOK Ostpreußen) and was pivotal in the defence of East and West Prussia before end of World War II in Europe on 9 May 1945.[1]

CommandersEdit

No. Commander Took office Left office Time in office
1Bock, FedorGeneraloberst
Fedor von Bock
(1880–1945)
26 August 19392 September 19397 days
2Weichs, MaximilianGeneraloberst
Maximilian von Weichs
(1881–1954)
20 October 193915 November 19412 years, 26 days
3Schmidt, RudolfGeneral der Panzertruppe
Rudolf Schmidt
(1886–1957)
15 November 194115 January 194261 days
(2)Weichs, MaximilianGeneraloberst
Maximilian von Weichs
(1881–1954)
15 January 194214 July 1942180 days
4Salmuth, HansGeneraloberst
Hans von Salmuth
(1888–1962)
15 July 19423 February 1943203 days
5Weiß, WalterGeneraloberst
Walter Weiß
(1890–1967)
4 February 19439 March 19452 years, 33 days
6Saucken, DietrichGeneral der Panzertruppe
Dietrich von Saucken
(1892–1980)
10 March 19457 April 194528 days
 
Organization of 2nd Army during operations in the Balkans[2]

See alsoEdit

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ Beevor, Antony. Berlin: The Downfall 1945, Penguin Books, 2002, ISBN 0-670-88695-5, pp.26, 49, 50, 88, 90, 115–116, 119, 402
  2. ^ Nafziger, George. "German 2nd Army, Invasion of the Balkans, 1 April 1941" (PDF). The Nafziger Orders of Battle Collection. United States Army Combined Arms College. Retrieved 6 December 2015.