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2C-P is a relatively potent and long acting psychedelic phenethylamine and 2C compound.

2C-P
2C-P2DACS.svg
2C-P-3d-sticks.png
2C-P animation.gif
Names
IUPAC name
2-(2,5-Dimethoxy-4-propylphenyl)ethanamine
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
UNII
Properties
C13H21NO2
Molar mass 223.3126 g/mol
Melting point 207 to 209 °C (405 to 408 °F; 480 to 482 K) (hydrochloride)
7-9 mg/ml (20 °C)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Contents

ChemistryEdit

2C-P is 2,5-dimethoxy-4-n-propylphenethylamine. The full name of the chemical is 2-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-propylphenyl)ethanamine. The hydrochloride salt is the most common form, normally found as a white powder,[1][unreliable source?] or white crystals.[2]Shulgin's 2C-P crude freebase (soluble in chloroform), after "removal of the solvent under vacuum," was an off-white colored oil which he distilled at 100–110 °C at 40 Pa (0.3 mmHg) (turning it "water white" in color), and it "spontaneously crystallized" upon cooling.

EffectsEdit

2C-P produces intense hallucinogenic, psychedelic, and entheogenic effects including open eye visualizations and closed-eye visualizations.[2] It can have a very slow onset if ingested, and peak effects reportedly do not occur for 3 to 5 hours.[2] The peak lasts for five to ten hours, with the overall experience lasting up to 20 hours.

DoseEdit

In his book PiHKAL, Shulgin listed 2C-P's dosage range as 6–10 mg and wrote that while most reports with dosages between 6 and 12 mg were favorable, "there was one report of an experience in which a single dosage of 16 mg was clearly an overdose, with the entire experiment labeled a physical disaster, not to be repeated."[2] He cautioned readers regarding dosing with 2C-P by commenting that "a consistent observation is that there may not be too much latitude in dosage between that which would be modest, or adequate, and that which would be excessive. The need for individual titration would be most important with this compound."[2] 2C-P is one of the most potent compounds in the 2C family of psychedelics, rivaled only by 2C-TFM.

Overdoses and deathsEdit

Unknown (or unreported) dosages taken by teenagers at a Connecticut, US concert in September 2013 caused seven people to require emergency medical help including CPR and defibrillation to resuscitate some of them, with all seven being taken to a hospital and four of those being hospitalized until at least the next day.[3] It was reported that none of the overdose victims died[4] while CNN's "OutFront" blog claimed the police called it a "mass casualty event"[5] blaming the problems on 2C-P and drugs apparently being sold as "Molly", a common name for MDMA.

Louella Fletcher-Michie, the daughter of actor John Michie, died from a 2C-P overdose in September 2017 at the Bestival festival in Dorset, UK, the first reported death from 2C-P.[6] Ceon Broughton was found guilty of manslaughter, by failing to intervene for over six hours.

Legal statusEdit

2C-P is not scheduled by the United Nations' Convention on Psychotropic Substances.

CanadaEdit

As of October 31, 2016; 2C-P is a controlled substance (Schedule III) in Canada. [7]

ChinaEdit

As of October 2015 2C-P is a controlled substance in China.[8]

DenmarkEdit

In Denmark, 2C-P has been added to the list of Schedule B controlled substances.[9]

GermanyEdit

2C-P is a Anlage I controlled drug.

SwedenEdit

The Riksdag added 2C-P to Narcotic Drugs Punishments Act under swedish schedule I ("substances, plant materials and fungi which normally do not have medical use" ) as of August 16, 2016, published by Medical Products Agency (MPA) in regulation HSLF-FS 2016:80 listed as 2,5-dimetoxi-4-propylfenetylamin.[10]

United KingdomEdit

2C-P is a Class A drug in the UK.[11]

United StatesEdit

2C-P was placed into Schedule I (with the DEA Drug Code of 7524) making it illegal to possess, distribute and/or manufacture without a license in the United States by an act of the US Congress on July 9, 2012 when US President Barack Obama signed the Synthetic Drug Abuse Prevention Act of 2012 (SDAPA).[12] The law came into effect on January 4, 2013.[13]

In popular cultureEdit

In the first episode of the CBS fictional TV drama series Battle Creek, a local police detective is tasked with solving a double murder where an assisting FBI agent claims the victims were operating a clandestine laboratory manufacturing 2C-P.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Erowid 2C-P Vault : Images". www.erowid.org.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Erowid Online Books : "PIHKAL" - #36 2C-P". www.erowid.org.
  3. ^ "Four overdose at Quassy Amusement Park concert - WTNH.com Connecticut". 27 November 2013. Archived from the original on 27 November 2013.
  4. ^ "New 'it' drug? Molly's powerful, deadly cousin". HLN TV.
  5. ^ "Police: "2C-P" and "Molly" involved in drug overdoses amusement park concert". cnn.com.
  6. ^ Siddique, Haroon (5 February 2019). "Party drugs killed TV actor's daughter at music festival, court hears". The Guardian. Retrieved 5 February 2019.
  7. ^ "Regulations Amending the Food and Drug Regulations (Part J — 2C-phenethylamines)". The Government of Canada. April 15, 2016. Retrieved 2017-06-22.
  8. ^ "关于印发《非药用类麻醉药品和精神药品列管办法》的通知" (in Chinese). China Food and Drug Administration. 27 September 2015. Retrieved 1 October 2015.
  9. ^ https://www.retsinformation.dk/Forms/R0710.aspx?id=137169
  10. ^ https://lakemedelsverket.se/upload/lvfs/HSLF-FS/HSLF-FS_2016_80.pdf
  11. ^ "Bestival death: Ceon Broughton jailed for manslaughter". BBC News. BBC. 1 March 2019. Retrieved 1 March 2019.
  12. ^ "Text of S. 3190 (112th): Synthetic Drug Abuse Prevention Act of 2012 (Introduced version) - GovTrack.us". GovTrack.us.
  13. ^ Rules - 2013 > Establishment of Drug Codes for 26 Substances

External linksEdit