28th Manitoba Legislature

The members of the 28th Manitoba Legislature were elected in the Manitoba general election held in June 1966.[1] The legislature sat from December 5, 1966, to May 22, 1969.[2]

The Progressive Conservative Party led by Duff Roblin formed the government. Walter Weir became Premier in 1967[1] after Roblin resigned to run unsuccessfully for the federal Progressive Conservative Party leadership.[3]

Gildas Molgat of the Liberal Party was Leader of the Opposition.[4]

A new sales tax of 5% was introduced effective June 1, 1967.[5]

James Bilton served as speaker for the assembly.[1]

There were three sessions of the 28th Legislature:[2]

Session Start End
1st December 5, 1966 May 4, 1967
2nd March 7, 1968 May 25, 1968
3rd February 27, 1969 May 22, 1969

Richard Spink Bowles was Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba.[6]

Members of the AssemblyEdit

The following members were elected to the assembly in 1966:[1]

Member Electoral district Party[7]
  J. Douglas Watt Arthur Progressive Conservative
  Stephen Patrick Assiniboia Liberal
  Rod Clement Birtle-Russell Liberal
  Reginald Lissaman Brandon Progressive Conservative
  Sam Uskiw Brokenhead NDP
  Ben Hanuschak Burrows NDP
  Leonard Barkman Carillon Liberal
  Gordon Beard Churchill[nb 1] Progressive Conservative
  Thelma Forbes Cypress Progressive Conservative
  Stewart McLean Dauphin Progressive Conservative
  William Homer Hamilton Dufferin Progressive Conservative
  Russell Doern Elmwood NDP
  John Tanchak Emerson Liberal
  Michael Kawchuk Ethelbert Plains NDP
  Peter Masniuk Fisher Progressive Conservative
  Charles Witney Flin Flon Progressive Conservative
  Sterling Lyon Fort Garry Progressive Conservative
  Gurney Evans Fort Rouge Progressive Conservative
  George Johnson Gimli Progressive Conservative
  Nelson Shoemaker Gladstone Liberal
  Earl Dawson Hamiota Liberal
  Sidney Green Inkster NDP
  Peter Fox Kildonan NDP
  Oscar Bjornson Lac du Bonnet Progressive Conservative
  Douglas Lloyd Campbell Lakeside Liberal
  Albert Vielfaure La Verendrye Liberal
  Lemuel Harris Logan NDP
  Walter Weir Minnedosa Progressive Conservative
  Harold Shewman Morris Progressive Conservative
  Obie Baizley Osborne Progressive Conservative
  Carolyne Morrison Pembina Progressive Conservative
  Gordon Johnston Portage la Prairie Liberal
  Russell Paulley Radisson NDP
  Jacob Froese Rhineland Social Credit
  Sidney Spivak River Heights Progressive Conservative
  Wally McKenzie Roblin Progressive Conservative
  Henry Einarson Rock Lake Progressive Conservative
  Harry Enns Rockwood—Iberville Progressive Conservative
  Joseph Jeannotte Rupertsland Progressive Conservative
  Laurent Desjardins St. Boniface Liberal
  Elman Guttormson St. George Liberal
  Douglas Stanes St. James Progressive Conservative
  Saul Cherniack St. Johns NDP
  Robert Steen St. Matthews Progressive Conservative
  Donald Craik St. Vital Progressive Conservative
  Gildas Molgat Ste. Rose Liberal
  Thomas P. Hillhouse Selkirk Liberal
  Saul Miller Seven Oaks NDP
  Malcolm Earl McKellar Souris-Lansdowne Progressive Conservative
  Fred Klym Springfield Progressive Conservative
  James Bilton Swan River Progressive Conservative
  John Carroll The Pas Progressive Conservative
  Edward Dow Turtle Mountain Liberal
  Morris McGregor Virden Progressive Conservative
  Philip Petursson Wellington NDP
  James Cowan Winnipeg Centre Progressive Conservative
  Dufferin Roblin Wolseley Progressive Conservative

Notes:

  1. ^ Election held July 7, 1966

By-electionsEdit

By-elections were held to replace members for various reasons:

Electoral district Member elected Affiliation Election date Reason
Turtle Mountain Edward Dow Liberal March 4, 1968 Results of 1966 election overturned[8]
Birtle-Russell Harry Graham Progressive Conservative February 20, 1969 R Clement resigned to run unsuccessfully for federal seat[8]
Churchill Joseph Borowski NDP February 20, 1969 G Beard resigned October 8, 1968[8]
Morris Warner Jorgenson Progressive Conservative February 20, 1969 H Shewman died July 13, 1968[8]
Wolseley Leonard Claydon Progressive Conservative February 20, 1969 D Roblin resigned to run unsuccessfully for federal seat[8]

Notes:


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Members of the Twenty-Eighth Legislative Assembly of Manitoba (1966–1969)". Memorable Manitobans. Manitoba Historical Society. Retrieved 2013-11-23.
  2. ^ a b Normandin, Pierre G (1976). Canadian Parliamentary Guide.
  3. ^ Martin, Sandra (May 31, 2010). "Duff Roblin, former Manitoba premier, dies at 92". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2013-11-02.
  4. ^ "Leaders of the Opposition - Manitoba". Library of Parliament. Retrieved 2013-11-23.
  5. ^ "Province gears for 5% Revenue Tax June 1" (PDF). Government of Manitoba. April 24, 1967.
  6. ^ "Past lieutenant governors". Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba. Archived from the original on 2014-01-05. Retrieved 2014-07-21.
  7. ^ "Historical Summaries" (PDF). Elections Manitoba. Retrieved 2013-11-23.
  8. ^ a b c d e "Biographies of Deceased Members". Legislative Assembly of Manitoba. Archived from the original on 2014-03-30.