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Bellona (minor planet designation: 28 Bellona) is a large main-belt asteroid. It was discovered by R. Luther on March 1, 1854, and named after Bellōna, the Roman goddess of war; the name was chosen to mark the beginning of the Crimean War.

28 Bellona 28 Bellona symbol.svg
28Bell-LB1-mag12.jpg
Bellona (apmag 11.8) near a magnitude 12 star, next to Abell 2670[1]
Discovery
Discovered byR. Luther
Discovery date1 March 1854
Designations
MPC designation(28) Bellona
Pronunciation/bɛˈlnə/ bel-OH-nə
Named after
Bellona
1951 CC2
Main belt
Orbital characteristics
Epoch Sept 30, 2012 (JD 2456200.5)
Aphelion477.240 Gm (3.196 AU)
Perihelion353.977 Gm (2.358 AU)
415.608 Gm (2.777 AU)
Eccentricity0.151
1690.19 d (4.63 a)
121.574°
Inclination9.430°
144.330°
344.461°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions97 ± 11 km[2]
120.9 ± 3.4 km (IRAS)[3]
108.10 ± 11.49 km[4]
Mass(2.62±0.15)×1018 kg[4]
Mean density
3.95 ± 1.28 g/cm3[4]
15.706 h[3][5]
0.1763[3][6]
S[3]
7.09[3]

Bellona has been studied by radar.[7] Photometric observations of this asteroid at the Palmer Divide Observatory in Colorado Springs, Colorado in 2007 gave a light curve with a period of 15.707 ± 0.002 hours and a brightness variation of 0.27 ± 0.03 in magnitude. This report is in close agreement with a period estimate of 15.695 hours reported in 1983, and rejects a longer period of 16.523 hours reported in 1979.[8]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Astrometry.net job 1005148". Astrometry.net. Retrieved 6 February 2015.
  2. ^ Ďurech, Josef; Kaasalainen, Mikko; Herald, David; Dunham, David; Timerson, Brad; Hanuš, Josef; et al. (2011). "Combining asteroid models derived by lightcurve inversion with asteroidal occultation silhouettes" (PDF). Icarus. 214 (2): 652–670. arXiv:1104.4227. Bibcode:2011Icar..214..652D. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.03.016.
  3. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 28 Bellona". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 28 January 2012. 2012-01-02 last obs
  4. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009. See Table 1.
  5. ^ http://www.psi.edu/pds/asteroid/EAR_A_5_DDR_DERIVED_LIGHTCURVE_V8_0/data/lc.tab
  6. ^ http://www.psi.edu/pds/asteroid/EAR_A_5_DDR_ALBEDOS_V1_1/data/albedos.tab
  7. ^ "Radar-Detected Asteroids and Comets". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 30 October 2011.
  8. ^ Warner, Brian D. (December 2007), "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory - March-May 2007", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 34 (4), pp. 104–107, Bibcode:2007MPBu...34..104W.

External linksEdit