The 240s decade ran from January 1, 240, to December 31, 249.

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

Events

240

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
PersiaEdit
IndiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit
  • Mani, a young mystic of Ctesiphon, proclaims himself a prophet at the court of Ardashir I. He preaches his doctrine, Manichaeism, throughout the Sassanid Empire.

241

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
PersiaEdit
EuropeEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

242

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
  • Emperor Gordian III begins a campaign against King Shapur I; Greek philosopher Plotinus joins him, hoping to obtain first-hand knowledge of Persian and Indian philosophies.
  • Gordian III evacuates the Cimmerian cities in the Bosphorus (Crimea), as the territory is now controlled by the Goths.
PersiaEdit
  • Shapur I makes a pre-emptive attack on Antioch to drive out the Romans. Gordian's father-in-law, Timesitheus, leads a Roman army to defeat the Sassanids at Carrhae and Nisibis.
  • King Ardashir I, founder of the Sassanid Empire, dies after a 30-year reign. He is succeeded by his son and co-ruler Shapur I.

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

243

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit

244

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
ChinaEdit
KoreaEdit

By topicEdit

Art and ScienceEdit
CommerceEdit
  • The silver content of the Roman denarius falls to 0.5 percent under emperor Philippus I, down from 28 percent under Gordian III.
ReligionEdit

245

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
VietnamEdit

246

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
KoreaEdit

247

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit
KoreaEdit

248

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

249

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit
  • In Alexandria, the populace pillages the homes of Christians.

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

240

241

242

243

244

245

246

247

248

249

  • Shi Chong (or Jilun), Chinese politician and statesmen

DeathsEdit

240

241

242

243

  • Gu Yong (or Yuantan), Chinese official and politician (b. 168)
  • Hu Zong (or Weize), Chinese official and general (b. 183)
  • Timesitheus, Roman advisor and praetorian prefect (b. 190)
  • Xue Zong (or Jingwen), Chinese official, politician and poet

244

245

  • Ammonius Saccas, Alexandrian-Greek philosopher (approximate date)
  • Lu Xun (or Boyan), Chinese general and statesman (b. 183)
  • Wu (or Wu Xian), Chinese empress of the Shu Han state
  • Wu Can (or Kongxiu), Chinese official and politician
  • Zhao Yan (or Boran), Chinese official and general (b. 171)

246

  • Dong Yun (or Xiuzhao), Chinese general and politician
  • Gu Tan (or Zimo), Chinese official and politician (b. 205)
  • Jiang Wan (or Gongyan), Chinese general and statesman

247

248

249

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Stratton, J. M. (1969). Agricultural Records. London: John Baker. ISBN 0-212-97022-4.
  2. ^ Walker, Brett L. (2015). A Concise History of Japan. Cambridge University Press. p. 18. ISBN 9781107004184.
  3. ^ "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  4. ^ "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  5. ^ Song, Geng (2004). The Fragile Scholar: Power and Masculinity in Chinese Culture. Hong Kong University Press. p. 143. ISBN 9789622096202.
  6. ^ Biographical Dictionary of Chinese Women: Antiquity Through Sui, 1600 B.C.E.-618 C.E. M.E. Sharpe. 1998. p. 272. ISBN 9780765641823.
  7. ^ Chen, Shou (300). Records of the Three Kingdoms (Sanguozhi ed.). China.