23rd Alberta Legislature

The 23rd Alberta Legislative Assembly was in session from August 30, 1993, to February 11, 1997, with the membership of the assembly determined by the results of the 1993 Alberta general election held on June 15, 1993. The Legislature officially resumed on August 30, 1993, and continued until the fifth session was prorogued and dissolved on February 11, 1997, prior to the 1997 Alberta general election on March 11, 1997.[1]

23rd Alberta Legislature
Majority parliament
August 30, 1993 – February 11, 1997
Coat of arms of Alberta.svg
Parliament leaders
Premier
(cabinet)
Ralph Klein
(Klein cabinet)
14 December 1992 - 14 December 2006
Leader of the
Opposition
Laurence Decore
June 15, 1993 – July 15, 1994
Grant Mitchell
November 12, 1994 – April 17, 1998
Party caucuses
GovernmentProgressive Conservative Association
OppositionLiberal Party
Legislative Assembly
Speaker of the
Assembly
Stanley Schumacher
30 August 1993 - 17 April 1997
Members83 MLA seats
Sovereign
MonarchElizabeth II
6 February 1952 - present
Lieutenant
Governor
Hon. Gordon Towers
11 March 1991 - 17 April 1996
Hon. Bud Olson
17 April 1996 - 10 February 2000
Sessions
1st Session
August 30, 1993 – February 9, 1994
2nd Session
February 10, 1994 – February 12, 1995
3rd Session
February 13, 1995 – February 12, 1996
4th Session
February 13, 1996 – February 9, 1997
5th Session
February 10, 1997 – February 11, 1997
<22nd 24th>

Alberta's twenty-second government was controlled by the majority Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta, led by Premier Ralph Klein. The Official Opposition was led by Laurence Decore of the Liberal Party, and later Grant Mitchell. The Speaker was Stanley Schumacher.

BillsEdit

Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy ActEdit

The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FOIP Act) is the freedom of information and privacy act for Alberta, Canada. It was passed by the Alberta Legislature in June 1994 and came into force on October 1, 1995.[2]

Civil Enforcement ActEdit

The Civil Enforcement Act, S.A. 1994, c.C-10.5, is a law in Alberta, Canada. The law gave responsibility for seizures, evictions, repossessions, and enforcing court orders to authorized civil enforcement agencies. Sheriffs' Offices throughout the province closed, but The Office of the Sheriff - Civil Enforcement was created under the Court Services Division of Alberta Justice to monitor the civil enforcement agency activities and respond to complaints. The Act was proclaimed in force on January 1, 1996.

Electric Utilities ActEdit

The Electric Utilities Act (1996) effective January 1, 1996, which created Power Pool of Alberta, a wholesale market clearing entity. The Power Pool was a not for profit entity that operated the "competitive wholesale market including dispatch of generation."[3] The Electric Utilities Act stipulated all electric energy bought and sold in Alberta had to be exchanged through the Power Pool which "served as an independent, central, open access pool." It functioned as a "spot market intending to match the demand with the lowest cost supply and establish an hourly pool price."[3] Alberta was the first Canadian province to implement a deregulated electricity market. Competitive wholesale markets were being fostered in the 1990s as part of the liberalization process of the 1990s changing some parameters such as the unbundling of generation, transmission and distribution functions of incumbent utilities.[4] Local distribution utilities, either investor- or municipally owned, retained the obligation to supply and the 6 largest utilities were assigned a share of the output of existing generators at a fixed price.

Party standings after the 23rd General ElectionEdit

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Affiliation Members
  Progressive Conservative Party 51
  Liberal Party 32
 Total
83

Standing changesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Perry, Sandra E.; Footz, Valerie L. (2006). Massolin, Philip A. (ed.). A Higher Duty: Speakers of the Legislative Assemblies. Edmonton, AB: Legislative Assembly of Alberta. p. 502. ISBN 0-9689217-3-6. Retrieved August 9, 2020.
  2. ^ "FOIP - OIPC". Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Alberta.
  3. ^ a b Manning, Lewis L. (nd), The State of Electricity De-Regulation in Alberta and the Alberta Electric System Operators Role (PDF), retrieved 22 December 2013
  4. ^ "Energy Policies of IEA Countries - Canada 2009 Review", International Energy Agency, Paris: OECD/IEA, pp. 193–195, 2009, ISBN 978-92-64-06043-2

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit