22 (twenty-two) is the natural number following 21 and preceding 23.

← 21 22 23 →
Cardinaltwenty-two
Ordinal22nd
(twenty-second)
Factorization2 × 11
Divisors1, 2, 11, 22
Greek numeralΚΒ´
Roman numeralXXII
Binary101102
Ternary2113
Senary346
Octal268
Duodecimal1A12
Hexadecimal1616

In mathematics Edit

 
The first 22 numbers can be arranged on a graph such that select sums between two numbers in the set yield all primes from 3 to 43. The graph has near-perfect vertical and horizontal reflective symmetry.[1]

22 is a palindromic number.[2][3] It is the second Smith number, the second Erdős–Woods number, and the fourth large Schröder number.[4][5][6] It is also a Perrin number, from a sum of 10 and 12.[7]

22 is the sixth distinct semiprime,[8] and the fouth of the form   where   is a higher prime. It is the second member of the second cluster of discrete biprimes (21, 22), where the next such cluster is (38, 39). It contains an aliquot sum of 14 (itself semiprime), within an aliquot sequence of four composite numbers (22, 14, 10, 8, 7, 1, 0) that are rooted in the prime 7-aliquot tree.

The maximum number of regions into which five intersecting circles divide the plane is 22.[9] 22 is also the quantity of pieces in a disc that can be created with six straight cuts, which makes 22 the seventh central polygonal number.[10][11]

22 is the fourth pentagonal number, the third hexagonal pyramidal number, and the third centered heptagonal number.[12][13][14]

  is a commonly used approximation of the irrational number π, the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter, where in particular 22 and 7 are consecutive hexagonal pyramidal numbers. Also,

  from an approximate construction of the squaring of the circle by Srinivasa Ramanujan, correct to eight decimal places.[15]

Natural logarithms of integers in binary are known to have Bailey–Borwein–Plouffe type formulae for   for all integers  .[16][17]

22 is the number of partitions of 8, as well as the sum of the totient function over the first eight integers, with φ(n) for 22 returning 10.[18][19]

22 can read as "two twos", which is the only fixed point of John Conway's look-and-say function. In other words, "22" generates the infinite repeating sequence "22, 22, 22, ..."[20]

All regular polygons with   <   edges can be constructed with an angle trisector, with the exception of the 11-sided hendecagon.[21]

There is an elementary set of twenty-two single-orbit convex tilings that tessellate two-dimensional space with face-transitive, edge-transitive, and/or vertex-transitive properties: eleven of these are regular and semiregular Archimedean tilings, while the other eleven are their dual Laves tilings. Twenty-two edge-to-edge star polygon tilings exist in the second dimension that incorporate regular convex polygons: eighteen involve specific angles, while four involve angles that are adjustable.[22] Finally, there are also twenty-two regular complex apeirohedra of the form p{a}q{b}r: eight are self-dual, while fourteen exist as dual polytope pairs; twenty-one belong in   while one belongs in  .[23]

There are twenty-two different subgroups that describe full icosahedral symmetry. Three groups are generated by particular inversions, five groups by reflections, and nine groups by rotations, alongside three mixed groups, the pyritohedral group, and the full icosahedral group.

There are 22 finite semiregular polytopes through the eighth dimension, aside from the infinite families of prisms and antiprisms in the third dimension and inclusive of 2 enantiomorphic forms. Defined as vertex-transitive polytopes with regular facets, there are:

The family of k21 polytopes can be extended backward to include the rectified 5-cell and the three-dimensional triangular prism, which is the simplest semiregular polytope.
On the other hand, k22 polytopes are a family of five different polytopes up through the eighth dimension, that include three finite polytopes and two honeycombs. Its root figure is the first proper duoprism, the 3-3 duoprism (-122), which is made of six triangular prisms. The second figure is the birectified 5-simplex (022), and the last finite figure is the 6th-dimensional 122 polytope. 122 is highly symmetric, whose 72 vertices represent the root vectors of the simple Lie group E6. 322 is a paracompact infinite honeycomb that contains 222 Euclidean honeycomb facets under Coxeter group symmetry  , with 222 made of 122 facets, and so forth. The Coxeter symbol for these figures is of the form kij, where each letter represents a length of order-3 branches on a Coxeter–Dynkin diagram with a single ring on the end node of a k-length sequence of branches.

There are twenty-two Coxeter groups in the sixth dimension that generate uniform polytopes: four of these generate uniform non-prismatic figures, while the remaining eighteen generate uniform prisms, duoprisms and triaprisms.

The number 22 appears prominently within sporadic groups. Mathieu group M22 is one of 26 such sporadic finite simple groups, defined as the 3-transitive permutation representation on 22 points. It is the monomial of the McLaughlin sporadic group, McL, and the unique index 2 subgroup of the automorphism group of Steiner system S(3,6,22).[24] Mathieu group M23 contains M22 as a point stabilizer, and has a minimal irreducible complex representation in 22 dimensions, like McL. M23 has two rank 3 actions on 253 points, with 253 equal to the sum of the first 22 non-zero positive integers, or the 22nd triangular number. Both M22 and M23 are maximal subgroups within Mathieu group M24, which works inside the lexicographic generation of Steiner system S(5,8,24) W24, where single elements within 759 octads of 24-element sets occur 253 times throughout its entire set. On the other hand, the Higman–Sims sporadic group HS also has a minimal faithful complex representation in 22 dimensions, and is equal to 100 times the group order of M22, |HS| = 100|M22|. Conway group Co1 and Fischer group Fi24 both have 22 different conjugacy classes.

The extended binary Golay code  , which is related to Steiner system W24, is constructed as a vector space of F2 from the words:[25]

  and   
with  , and   the quadratic residue code of the binary Golay code   (with   its parity check). M23 is the automorphism group of  .

The extended ternary Golay code [12, 6, 6], whose root is the ternary Golay code [11, 6, 5] over F3, has a complete weight enumerator value equal to:[26]

 

The 22nd unique prime in base ten is notable for having starkly different digits compared to its preceding (and latter) unique primes, as well as for the similarity of its digits to those of the reciprocal of 7   Being 84 digits long with a period length of 294 digits, it is the number:[27]

 

In science Edit

In aircraft Edit

  • 22 is the designation of the USAF stealth fighter, the F-22 Raptor.

In art, entertainment, and media Edit

In music Edit

In other fields Edit

  • Catch-22 (1961), Joseph Heller's novel, and its 1970 film adaptation gave rise to the expression of logic "catch-22".[53]
  • Revista 22 is a magazine published in Romania.
  • There are 22 stars in the Paramount Pictures logo.[54]
  • "Twenty Two" (February 10, 1961) is Season 2–episode 17 (February 10, 1961) of the 1959–1964 TV series The Twilight Zone, in which a hospitalized dancer has nightmares about a sinister nurse inviting her to Room 22, the hospital morgue.
  • Traditional Tarot decks have 22 cards with allegorical subjects. These serve as trump cards in the game. The Fool is usually a kind of wild-card among the trumps and unnumbered, so the highest trump is numbered 21. Occult Tarot decks usually have 22 similar cards which are called Major Arcana by fortune-tellers. Occultists have related this number to the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet and the 22 paths in the Kabbalistic Tree of Life.
  • "22" is the number assigned to the unborn soul who serves as a prominent character in the Pixar film Soul.

In computing and technology Edit

In culture and religion Edit

In sports Edit

  • In both American football and association football, a total of 22 players (counting both teams) start the game, and this is also the maximum number of players that can be legally involved in play at any given time.
  • In men's Australian rules football, each team is allowed a squad of 22 players (18 on the field and 4 interchanges).
  • The length of a cricket pitch is 22 yards.
  • In rugby union, the "22" is a line in each half of the field which is 22 meters from the respective try line. It has significance in a number of laws particularly relating to kicking the ball away.
  • A snooker game (called a "frame") starts with 22 coloured balls at specified locations on the table (15 red balls and 7 others).

In weights and measures Edit

In other uses Edit

Twenty-two may also refer to:

See also Edit

References Edit

  1. ^ Barton, James. "The Number 22: Properties and Meanings". Virtue Science. Archived from the original on 2023-07-23. Retrieved 2022-04-17.
  2. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002113 (Palindromes in base 10)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-04-16.
  3. ^ Weisstein, Eric W. "Semiprime". mathworld.wolfram.com. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  4. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A006753 (Smith numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  5. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A059756 (Erdős-Woods numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  6. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A006318 (Large Schröder numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-06-01.
  7. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001608 (Perrin sequence)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  8. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001358". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  9. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A014206". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-04-16.
  10. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000124 (Central polygonal numbers (the Lazy Caterer's sequence))". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  11. ^ Wells, D. The Penguin Dictionary of Curious and Interesting Numbers London: Penguin Group. (1986): 31
  12. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000326 (Pentagonal numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  13. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A069099 (Centered heptagonal numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  14. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002412 (Hexagonal pyramidal numbers, or greengrocer's numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-04-16.
  15. ^ Ramanujan, S. (1914). "Modular equations and approximations to π" (PDF). Quarterly Journal of Mathematics. 45: 350–372.
  16. ^ Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Peter B.; Plouffe, Simon (1997). "On the Rapid Computation of Various Polylogarithmic Constants". Mathematics of Computation. 66 (218): 905. doi:10.1090/S0025-5718-97-00856-9. MR 1415794.
  17. ^ Chamberland, Marc (2003). "Binary BBP-Formulae for Logarithms and Generalized Gaussian-Mersenne Primes" (PDF). Journal of Integer Sequences. 6 (3.3.7): 5. Bibcode:2003JIntS...6...37C.
  18. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002088 (Sum of totient function)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  19. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000010 (Euler totient function phi(n))". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-04-16.
  20. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A010861 (Look-and-say constant sequence 22)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-07-21.
  21. ^ Gleason, Andrew M. (1988). "Angle trisection, the heptagon, and the triskaidecagon". American Mathematical Monthly. Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 95 (3): 191–194. doi:10.2307/2323624. JSTOR 2323624. MR 0935432. S2CID 119831032.
  22. ^ Tilings and Patterns Branko Gruenbaum, G.C. Shephard, 1987. 2.5 Tilings using star polygons, pp.82-85.
  23. ^ Coxeter, H.S.M. (1991), Regular Complex Polytopes, Cambridge University Press, p. 140, ISBN 0-521-39490-2
  24. ^ Weisstein, Eric W. "Mathieu Groups". mathworld.wolfram.com. Retrieved 2022-07-02.
  25. ^ Bernhardt, Frank; Landrock, Peter; Manz, Olaf (1990). "The Extended Golay Codes Considered as Ideals". Journal of Combinatorial Theory. Series A. 55 (2): 237. doi:10.1016/0097-3165(90)90069-9.
  26. ^ Ostergard, Patrick R. K.; Svanstrom, Mattias (2002). "Ternary Constant Weight Codes". The Electronic Journal of Combinatorics. 9: 13 (R41). doi:10.37236/1657.
  27. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A040017 (Unique period primes)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-05-20.
  28. ^ Twenty Two – Karma to Burn | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  29. ^ a b Twenty Two – The Vicar | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  30. ^ Twenty Two – Jordan Sweeney | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  31. ^ Twenty Two – The Good Life | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  32. ^ Twenty Two – Sweet Nectar | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  33. ^ Twenty Two – American Generals | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  34. ^ Twenty Two – Dan Anderson | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  35. ^ Twenty Two – Bad Cash Quartet | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  36. ^ Twenty Two – Millencolin | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  37. ^ Twenty Two – Enter the Worship Circle | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  38. ^ Twenty Two – Blank Dogs | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  39. ^ Twenty Two – Al Candello | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  40. ^ Twenty Two – Amen Dunes | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  41. ^ 22 Two's – Jay-Z | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  42. ^ 22 Acacia Avenue – Iron Maiden | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  43. ^ Catch 22 – Hypocrisy | Songs, Reviews, Credits | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  44. ^ 22 Dreams – Paul Weller | Songs, Reviews, Credits | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  45. ^ "Ugress | Album Discography". AllMusic. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  46. ^ Cinematronics – Ugress | Songs, Reviews, Credits | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  47. ^ Unicorn – Ugress | Songs, Reviews, Credits | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  48. ^ Number 22 – Ashbury Heights | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  49. ^ 22, A Million – Bon Iver | Songs, Reviews, Credits | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  50. ^ "Cubic 22 | Songs". AllMusic. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  51. ^ 22 – Deaf Havana | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  52. ^ 22 – Sarah McTernan | Song Info | AllMusic, retrieved 2020-08-12
  53. ^ "Definition of CATCH-22". www.merriam-webster.com. Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  54. ^ "Paramount Pictures' Logo Started as a Desktop Doodle, and Has Endured for 105 Years". Retrieved 2020-08-12.
  55. ^ González-Wippler, Migene (1991). The Complete Book of Amulets & Talismans. Llewellyn Worldwide. p. 87. ISBN 978-0-87542-287-9.
  56. ^ Sharp, Damian (2001). Simple Numerology: A Simple Wisdom book (A Simple Wisdom Book series). Red Wheel. p. 7. ISBN 978-1-57324-560-9.
  57. ^ "Definition of CHAIN". www.merriam-webster.com. Retrieved 2020-08-19. a unit of length equal to 66 feet
  58. ^ Cuartas, Javier (1990-01-05). "La suerte de los dos patitos" [The luck of the two little ducks]. El País (in Spanish). Oviedo. Retrieved 17 September 2020.
  59. ^ Sanz, Elena (26 April 2010). "Los dos patitos, la niña bonita, la mala pata..." Muy Interesante (in Spanish). Retrieved 17 September 2020. Lo más normal es que el nombre tuviera que ver con la forma del número. Por ejemplo, el 11 era las banderillas, y el 22, los dos patitos o las monjas arrodilladas.

External links Edit