2131 Mayall (1975 RA) is an inner main-belt asteroid discovered on September 3, 1975, by Arnold Klemola at the Lick Observatory and named in honor of Nicholas U. Mayall (1906–1993), director of the Kitt Peak National Observatory during 1960–1971, who also worked at Lick for many years.[1][2] It is about 8 km (~5 miles) in diameter.[6]

2131 Mayall
Discovery [1]
Discovered byA. R. Klemola
Discovery siteLick Obs.
Discovery date3 September 1975
Designations
MPC designation(2131) Mayall
Named after
Nicholas Mayall[2]
1975 RA
main-belt · (inner)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc41.05 yr (14,994 days)
Aphelion2.0970 AU
Perihelion1.6775 AU
1.8873 AU
Eccentricity0.1111
2.59 yr (947 days)
78.045°
0° 22m 48.36s / day
Inclination33.987°
306.05°
38.552°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions7.8 km (IRAS:3)[3]
8.252±0.040[4]
2.5678 h[5]
0.2391±0.031 (IRAS:3)[3]
0.244±0.019[4]
S (Tholen)[1]
S (SMASS)[1]
S[5]
B–V = 0.871[1]
U–B = 0.450[1]
12.72[1]

Photometric measurements of the asteroid made in 2005 at the Palmer Divide Observatory showed a light curve with a period of 2.572 ± 0.002 hours and a brightness variation of 0.08 ± 0.02 in magnitude.[7]

This lead to a follow up investigation in 2006, when another light curve was recorded.[6] These observations did not indicate a binary asteroid type, but did add to the data set available for this asteroid; this asteroid is part of the Hungaria group.[6]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2131 Mayall (1975 RA)" (2016-09-21 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 19 June 2017.
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). "(2131) Mayall". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2131) Mayall. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 173. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-29925-7_2132. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3.
  3. ^ a b Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. 12: IRAS-A-FPA-3-RDR-IMPS-V6.0. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 22 October 2019.
  4. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 19 June 2017.
  5. ^ a b "LCDB Data for (2131) Mayall". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 19 June 2017.
  6. ^ a b c Warner, Brian D.; Stephens, Robert D.; Higgins, David; Pravec, Petr (March 2007). "The Lightcurve of 2131 Mayall in 2006". Minor Planet Bulletin. 34: 23. ISSN 1052-8091.
  7. ^ Warner, Brian D. (2005), "Asteroid lightcurve analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory - winter 2004-2005" (PDF), The Minor Planet Bulletin, 32 (3): 54–58, Bibcode:2005MPBu...32...54W, retrieved 3 February 2013

External linksEdit