2026 United States Senate elections

The 2026 United States Senate elections are scheduled to be held on November 3, 2026, with 33 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested in regular elections, the winners of which will serve six-year terms in the United States Congress from January 3, 2027, to January 3, 2033. Senators are divided into three groups, or classes, whose terms are staggered so that a different class is elected every two years. Class 2 senators were last elected in 2020, and will be up for election again in 2026.

2026 United States Senate elections

← 2024 November 3, 2026 2028 →

33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate
51 seats needed for a majority

2026 United States Senate election in Alabama2026 United States Senate election in Alaska2026 United States Senate election in Arkansas2026 United States Senate election in Colorado2026 United States Senate election in Delaware2026 United States Senate election in Georgia2026 United States Senate election in Idaho2026 United States Senate election in Illinois2026 United States Senate election in Iowa2026 United States Senate election in Kansas2026 United States Senate election in Kentucky2026 United States Senate election in Louisiana2026 United States Senate election in Maine2026 United States Senate election in Massachusetts2026 United States Senate election in Michigan2026 United States Senate election in Minnesota2026 United States Senate election in Mississippi2026 United States Senate election in Montana2026 United States Senate election in Nebraska2026 United States Senate election in New Hampshire2026 United States Senate election in New Jersey2026 United States Senate election in New Mexico2026 United States Senate election in North Carolina2026 United States Senate election in Oklahoma2026 United States Senate election in Oregon2026 United States Senate election in Rhode Island2026 United States Senate election in South Carolina2026 United States Senate election in South Dakota2026 United States Senate election in Tennessee2026 United States Senate election in Texas2026 United States Senate election in Virginia2026 United States Senate election in West Virginia2026 United States Senate election in Wyoming2026 United States Senate elections retirements map.svg
About this image
Map of the incumbents:
     Democratic incumbent
     Republican incumbent
     No election
     Incumbent TBD

Incumbent Majority Leader

TBD in 2024



As of October 2022, no Republican senators have announced plans for retirement; no Republican senators have announced plans to run for re-election; no Democratic senators have announced plans for retirement; and three Democratic senators are running for re-election.

Partisan compositionEdit

All 33 Class 2 Senate seats are up for election in 2026; Class 2 currently consists of 20 Republicans and 13 Democrats. If vacancies occur in Class 1 or Class 3 Senate seats, that state might require a special election to take place during the 119th Congress, possibly concurrently with the other 2026 Senate elections.

Change in compositionEdit

Each block represents one of the one hundred seats in the U.S. Senate. "D#" is a Democratic senator, "I#" is an Independent senator, and "R#" is a Republican senator. They are arranged so that the parties are separated and a majority is clear by crossing the middle.

Before the electionsEdit

Each block indicates an incumbent senator's actions going into the election.

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20
Mich.
Undeclared
D19
Mass.
Running
D18
Ill.
Undeclared
D17
Ga.
Undeclared
D16
Del.
Undeclared
D15
Colo.
Undeclared
D14 D13 D12 D11
D21
Minn.
Undeclared
D22
N.H.
Running
D23
N.J.
Running
D24
N.M.
Undeclared
D25
Ore.
Undeclared
D26
R.I.
Undeclared
D27
Va.
Undeclared
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
Majority TBD →
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
R38
Wyo.
Undeclared
R37
W.Va.
Undeclared
R36
Texas
Undeclared
R35
Tenn.
Undeclared
R34
S.D.
Undeclared
R33
S.C.
Undeclared
R32
Okla.
Undeclared
R31
N.C.
Undeclared
R21
Mont.
Undeclared
R22
Miss.
Undeclared
R23
Maine
Undeclared
R24
La.
Undeclared
R25
Ky.
Undeclared
R26
Kan.
Undeclared
R27
Iowa
Undeclared
R28
Idaho
Undeclared
R29
Ark.
Undeclared
R30
Alaska
Undeclared
R20
Ala.
Undeclared
R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the electionsEdit

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2022
D14 D13 D12 D11
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
Ga.
TBD
Del.
TBD
Colo.
TBD
Ark.
TBD
Alaska
TBD
Ala.
TBD
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
Idaho
TBD
Ill.
TBD
Iowa
TBD
Kan.
TBD
Ky.
TBD
La.
TBD
Maine
TBD
Mass.
TBD
Mich.
TBD
Minn.
TBD
Majority TBD →
S.C.
TBD
R.I.
TBD
Ore.
TBD
Okla.
TBD
N.C.
TBD
N.M.
TBD
N.J.
TBD
N.H.
TBD
Mont.
TBD
Miss.
TBD
S.D.
TBD
Tenn.
TBD
Texas
TBD
Va.
TBD
W.Va.
TBD
Wyo.
TBD
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key
D# Democratic
R# Republican

Race summaryEdit

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history Last race
Alabama Tommy Tuberville Republican 2020 60.1% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Alaska Dan Sullivan Republican 2014
2020
53.9% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Arkansas Tom Cotton Republican 2014
2020
66.5% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Colorado John Hickenlooper Democratic 2020 53.5% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Delaware Chris Coons Democratic 2010 (Special)
2014
2020
59.4% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Georgia Jon Ossoff Democratic 2021 50.6% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Idaho Jim Risch Republican 2008
2014
2020
62.6% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Illinois Dick Durbin Democratic 1996
2002
2008
2014
2020
54.9% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Iowa Joni Ernst Republican 2014
2020
51.8% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Kansas Roger Marshall Republican 2020 53.2% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Kentucky Mitch McConnell Republican 1984
1990
1996
2002
2008
2014
2020
57.8% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Louisiana Bill Cassidy Republican 2014
2020
59.3% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Maine Susan Collins Republican 1996
2002
2008
2014
2020
51.0% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Massachusetts Ed Markey Democratic 2013 (Special)
2014
2020
66.2% D Incumbent running
Michigan Gary Peters Democratic 2014
2020
49.9% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Minnesota Tina Smith Democratic 2018 (Appointed)
2018 (Special)
2020
48.7% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Mississippi Cindy Hyde-Smith Republican 2018 (Appointed)
2018 (Special)
2020
54.1% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Montana Steve Daines Republican 2014
2020
55.0% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Nebraska TBA[a] TBA TBA[b] TBA Incumbent to be determined
  • TBD
New Hampshire Jeanne Shaheen Democratic 2008
2014
2020
56.7% D Incumbent running
New Jersey Cory Booker Democratic 2013 (Special)
2014
2020
57.2% D Incumbent running
New Mexico Ben Ray Luján Democratic 2020 51.7% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
North Carolina Thom Tillis Republican 2014
2020
48.7% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Oklahoma Markwayne Mullin Republican 2022 (Special) 61.9% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Oregon Jeff Merkley Democratic 2008
2014
2020
56.9% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Rhode Island Jack Reed Democratic 1996
2002
2008
2014
2020
66.5% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
South Carolina Lindsey Graham Republican 2002
2008
2014
2020
54.4% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
South Dakota Mike Rounds Republican 2014
2020
65.7% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Tennessee Bill Hagerty Republican 2020 62.2% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Texas John Cornyn Republican 2002
2008
2014
2020
53.5% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Virginia Mark Warner Democratic 2008
2014
2020
56.0% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
West Virginia Shelley Moore Capito Republican 2014
2020
70.3% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Wyoming Cynthia Lummis Republican 2020 73.1% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD

AlabamaEdit

One-term Republican Tommy Tuberville was elected in 2020 with 60.1% of the vote. He has filed paperwork to run for re-election.[4]

AlaskaEdit

Two-term Republican Dan Sullivan was re-elected in 2020 with 53.9% of the vote.

ArkansasEdit

Two-term Republican Tom Cotton was re-elected in 2020 with 66.5% of the vote.

ColoradoEdit

One-term Democrat John Hickenlooper was elected in 2020 with 53.5% of the vote.

DelawareEdit

Two-term Democrat Chris Coons was re-elected in 2020 with 59.4% of the vote.

GeorgiaEdit

One-term Democrat Jon Ossoff was elected in 2021 with 50.6% of the vote. He has not yet declared whether he will seek a second term, however he has filed papers to run again with the FEC.[5]

IdahoEdit

Three-term Republican Jim Risch was re-elected in 2020 with 62.6% of the vote.

IllinoisEdit

Five-term Democrat and Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin was re-elected in 2020 with 54.9% of the vote.

IowaEdit

Two-term Republican Joni Ernst was re-elected in 2020 with 51.8% of the vote.

KansasEdit

One- term Republican Roger Marshall was elected in 2020 with 53.2% of the vote.

KentuckyEdit

Seven-term Republican Mitch McConnell was re-elected in 2020 with 57.8% of the vote.

LouisianaEdit

Two-term Republican Bill Cassidy was re-elected in 2020 with 59.3% of the vote.

MaineEdit

Five-term Republican Susan Collins was re-elected in 2020 with 51.0% of the vote. She has not formally declared that she is running for a sixth term, but has filed paperwork to fundraise for a campaign.[6]

MassachusettsEdit

Two-term Democrat Ed Markey was re-elected in 2020 with 66.2% of the vote and is running for re-election to a third full term.[1]

MichiganEdit

Two-term Democrat Gary Peters was re-elected in 2020 with 49.9% of the vote.

MinnesotaEdit

One-term Democrat Tina Smith was elected in 2020 with 48.7% of the vote, having first been appointed in 2018, then winning the special election that same year. In February 2022, Al Franken who held the seat between 2009 and 2018 before resigning after being accused of sexual misconduct, expressed being tempted to seek his former Senate seat.[7]

MississippiEdit

One-term Republican Cindy Hyde-Smith was elected in 2020 with 54.1% of the vote, having first been appointed in 2018, then winning the special election that same year.

MontanaEdit

Two-term Republican Steve Daines was re-elected in 2020 with 55.0% of the vote.

NebraskaEdit

Two-term Republican Ben Sasse is resigning at the start of the 118th Congress to become president of the University of Florida.[8] An interim senator will be appointed by incoming governor Jim Pillen, who will run in the special election will take place in 2024.[9]

New HampshireEdit

Three-term Democrat Jeanne Shaheen was re-elected in 2020 with 56.6% of the vote and is running for re-election to a fourth term.[2]

New JerseyEdit

Two-term Democrat Cory Booker was re-elected in 2020 with 57.2% of the vote and is running for re-election to a third full term.[3]

New MexicoEdit

One-term Democrat Ben Ray Luján was elected in 2020 with 51.7% of the vote.

North CarolinaEdit

Two-term Republican Thom Tillis was re-elected in 2020 with 48.7% of the vote.

OklahomaEdit

Incumbent Republican Markwayne Mullin was elected in 2022 with 61.8% of the vote to succeed Jim Inhofe, who will resign on January 3, 2023.[10]

OregonEdit

Three-term Democrat Jeff Merkley was re-elected in 2020 with 56.9% of the vote.

Rhode IslandEdit

Five-term Democrat Jack Reed was re-elected in 2020 with 66.5% of the vote.

South CarolinaEdit

Four-term Republican Lindsey Graham was re-elected in 2020 with 54.4% of the vote.

South DakotaEdit

Two-term Republican Mike Rounds was re-elected in 2020 with 65.7% of the vote.

TennesseeEdit

One-term Republican Bill Hagerty was elected in 2020 with 62.2% of the vote.

TexasEdit

Four-term Republican John Cornyn was re-elected in 2020 with 53.5% of the vote. Republican U.S. representative Ronny Jackson has expressed interest in running.[11]

VirginiaEdit

Three-term Democrat Mark Warner was re-elected in 2020 with 56.0% of the vote.

West VirginiaEdit

Two-term Republican Shelley Moore Capito was re-elected in 2020 with 70.3% of the vote.

WyomingEdit

One-term Republican Cynthia Lummis was elected in 2020 with 72.9% of the vote.

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Incumbent Ben Sasse is reported to be resigning his seat early in January 2023 to become the president of the University of Florida. An interim senator will be appointed by the governor of Nebraska at the start of the 118th Congress; a special election will take place in 2024.
  2. ^ To be determined in the 2024 special election.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Pressley for president?". Politico.
  2. ^ a b DiStaso, John (November 19, 2020). "NH Primary Source: They're running again: Shaheen, Pappas file candidacies, reelection committees". WMUR. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  3. ^ a b Wildstein, David (February 14, 2022). "Booker says no to possible run for N.J. governor". New Jersey Globe. Retrieved February 14, 2022.
  4. ^ "Tommy Tuberville FEC Statement of Candidacy".
  5. ^ @CATargetBot (January 15, 2021). "NEW 2026 FEC F2 T. Jonathan Ossoff (DEM) #GASEN (D-Ossoff)" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  6. ^ "The story behind Susan Collins' comeback to win a historic 5th term". November 12, 2020.
  7. ^ "Al Franken calls Senate bid 'tempting' four years after resignation". February 10, 2022.
  8. ^ Emanuel, Mike (October 6, 2022). "Sasse resigning Senate seat, likely to be next University of Florida president". The New York Times.
  9. ^ Everett, Burgess; Levine, Marianne (October 5, 2022). "Sasse expected to resign from Senate". Politico.
  10. ^ Martin, Jonathan (February 24, 2022). "James Inhofe, Oklahoma Senator, Is Said to Plan an Early Retirement". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 25, 2022.
  11. ^ Svitek, Patrick (September 19, 2022). "U.S. Rep. Ronny Jackson, prominent Trump ally, weighing U.S. Senate run in 2026".