2023 Formula One World Championship

The 2023 FIA Formula One World Championship is a planned motor racing championship for Formula One cars which will be the 74th running of the Formula One World Championship.[a] It is recognised by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), the governing body of international motorsport, as the highest class of competition for open-wheel racing cars. The championship is due to be contested over a record twenty-four Grands Prix,[b] which will be held around the world, and is scheduled to begin in March and end in November.[2]

Max Verstappen will be the defending Formula One World Champion driving for Red Bull Racing.

Drivers and teams are scheduled to compete for the titles of World Drivers' Champion and World Constructors' Champion, respectively. Max Verstappen, driving for Red Bull Racing, is due to be the reigning Drivers' Champion, while his team is due to be the reigning Constructors' Champion.[3][4]

Entries

The following constructors and drivers are under contract to compete in the 2023 World Championship.[5] All teams are due to compete with tyres supplied by Pirelli.[6] Each team is required to enter at least two drivers, one for each of the two mandatory cars.[7]

Teams and drivers that are contracted to compete in the 2023 World Championship
Entrant Constructor Chassis Power unit Race drivers
No. Driver name
  Alfa Romeo F1 Team Orlen Alfa Romeo-Ferrari TBA Ferrari 24   Zhou Guanyu[8]
77   Valtteri Bottas[9]
  Scuderia AlphaTauri AlphaTauri-RBPT TBA Red Bull[10][11] 22   Yuki Tsunoda[12]
TBA   Nyck de Vries[13]
  BWT Alpine F1 Team Alpine-Renault TBA Renault 10   Pierre Gasly[14]
31   Esteban Ocon[15]
  Aston Martin Aramco Cognizant F1 Team Aston Martin Aramco-Mercedes AMR23[16] Mercedes 14   Fernando Alonso[16]
18   Lance Stroll[16]
  Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari TBA Ferrari 16   Charles Leclerc[17]
55   Carlos Sainz Jr.[18]
  MoneyGram Haas F1 Team[19] Haas-Ferrari TBA Ferrari[20] 20   Kevin Magnussen[21]
27   Nico Hülkenberg[22]
  McLaren F1 Team McLaren-Mercedes TBA Mercedes[23] 4   Lando Norris[24]
81   Oscar Piastri[25][26]
  Mercedes-AMG Petronas F1 Team Mercedes F1 W14[27] Mercedes 44   Lewis Hamilton[28]
63   George Russell[29]
  Oracle Red Bull Racing Red Bull Racing-RBPT TBA Red Bull[10][11] 1   Max Verstappen[30]
11   Sergio Pérez[31]
  Williams Racing Williams-Mercedes TBA Mercedes[32] 2   Logan Sargeant[33][34]
23   Alexander Albon[35]
Source:[36]

Driver changes

Oscar Piastri (left), Nyck de Vries (centre) and Logan Sargeant (right) are due to make their Formula One season debuts with McLaren, AlphaTauri and Williams, respectively.

Sebastian Vettel retired at the end of the 2022 championship, ending his Formula One career after 16 seasons.[37] His place at Aston Martin was taken by Fernando Alonso, who left Alpine after two seasons.[16] His replacement was initially announced as the 2021 Formula 2 Champion and reserve driver Oscar Piastri.[38] Shortly after the announcement, Piastri stated that he had not signed a contract for 2023 and that he would not be driving for Alpine.[39] The FIA Contract Recognition Board ruled that he did not have any contractual obligations to race for Alpine.[40] Pierre Gasly, who had a contract to drive for AlphaTauri, is due to move to Alpine, replacing Alonso.[14] Gasly is due to be replaced by the 2020–21 Formula E and 2019 Formula 2 Champion Nyck de Vries.[13]

Daniel Ricciardo left McLaren after two seasons. Although he had a contract to drive for the team in 2023, it was terminated during the 2022 championship by mutual agreement.[41] Ricciardo's seat is due to be filled by Piastri, who will make his Formula One debut.[25] Nicholas Latifi left Williams after spending three seasons with the team.[42] His seat is due to be filled by Logan Sargeant, who would make his Formula One debut by graduating from Formula 2, as well as becoming the first American Formula One driver to compete since Alexander Rossi in 2015 with former team Marussia.[33] Mick Schumacher left Haas after two seasons.[43] His seat is due to be taken by Nico Hülkenberg, who last competed in Formula One as a full-time race driver in 2019 with former team Renault.[22]

Calendar

The 2023 calendar is due to feature twenty-four Grands Prix.[2][b]

Round Grand Prix Circuit Race date
1 Bahrain Grand Prix   Bahrain International Circuit, Sakhir 5 March
2 Saudi Arabian Grand Prix   Jeddah Corniche Circuit, Jeddah 19 March
3 Australian Grand Prix   Albert Park Circuit, Melbourne 2 April
4 TBA[b]   TBA 16 April
5 Azerbaijan Grand Prix   Baku City Circuit, Baku 30 April
6 Miami Grand Prix   Miami International Autodrome, Miami Gardens, Florida 7 May
7 Emilia Romagna Grand Prix   Imola Circuit, Imola 21 May
8 Monaco Grand Prix   Circuit de Monaco, Monaco 28 May
9 Spanish Grand Prix   Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Montmeló 4 June
10 Canadian Grand Prix   Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montréal 18 June
11 Austrian Grand Prix   Red Bull Ring, Spielberg 2 July
12 British Grand Prix   Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone 9 July
13 Hungarian Grand Prix   Hungaroring, Mogyoród 23 July
14 Belgian Grand Prix   Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot 30 July
15 Dutch Grand Prix   Circuit Zandvoort, Zandvoort 27 August
16 Italian Grand Prix   Monza Circuit, Monza 3 September
17 Singapore Grand Prix   Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore 17 September
18 Japanese Grand Prix   Suzuka International Racing Course, Suzuka 24 September
19 Qatar Grand Prix   Lusail International Circuit, Lusail 8 October
20 United States Grand Prix   Circuit of the Americas, Austin, Texas 22 October
21 Mexico City Grand Prix   Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez, Mexico City 29 October
22 São Paulo Grand Prix   Interlagos Circuit, São Paulo 5 November
23 Las Vegas Grand Prix   Las Vegas Street Circuit, Las Vegas[c] 18 November
24 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix   Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi 26 November
Source:[2]

Calendar expansion and changes

Regulation changes

Technical regulations

Following large amounts of porpoising during 2022, the FIA is proposing to introduce changes to the regulations to limit excessive porpoising. Floor edges would be raised by 15 millimetres (0.59 in) and the throat of the diffuser would also be raised, by a yet to be determined amount. The diffuser edge stiffness will be increased and an additional sensor will be mandated to monitor the porpoising phenomenon more effectively.[51] Lateral floor deflection tests are also due to be more stringent.[52]

Following Zhou Guanyu's crash at the 2022 British Grand Prix, a rounded top will now be required on the roll hoop, which will reduce the chance of it digging into the ground during an accident; a change will be made to ensure a minimum height for the point of application of the homologation test; there will be a new physical homologation test where the load pushes the roll hoop in the forward direction; there will be a definition of new tests, to be carried out by calculation.[51]

Sporting regulations

With the intention of making tyre usage more sustainable in the future, Formula One will trial a reduction in allocated tyre sets from 13 to 11 at two races in 2023. At these races the use of tyres in qualifying will be mandated as hard in Q1, medium in Q2 and soft in Q3, assuming that the weather is dry. Teams are usually free to choose which tyre compound they run during qualifying.[53]

Pirelli announced a change to the available tyre compounds for 2023, with a compound to be inserted between the old C1 and C2 compounds. This change is supposed to provide teams with more flexible strategy options after criticism towards the original C1 compound for a large drop in grip compared to the other tyres.[54]

Sprint events

The sprint format is due to be run at six Grands Prix from this season onwards, compared to three in 2021 and 2022.[55] It is due to take place at the Azerbaijan, Austrian, Belgian, Qatar, United States and São Paulo Grands Prix. The Saudi Arabian Grand Prix remains in contention for a possible switch with the Qatar Grand Prix.[56]

Season summary

Pre-season

There is due to be one pre-season test, at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir on 23–25 February.[2]

Notes

  1. ^ In the history of Formula One, regulations were first introduced during the 1946 Grand Prix season. These were adopted for every race in 1948, and were formally organised into a championship in 1950.
  2. ^ a b c Following the cancellation of the Chinese Grand Prix, the FIA has announced an intention to replace the event, although no replacement has yet been found.[1]
  3. ^ The Las Vegas Street Circuit is subject to the FIA circuit homologation.[2]

References

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External links