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The 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup bidding process will result in the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) selecting the host for the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup

There are ten bids from ten countries vying to host the 2023 FIFA's Women's World Cup. The official announcement for which one of these countries will host the Women's World Cup will not be made until May 2020. As of September 2019, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Colombia, Japan, New Zealand, South Africa and South Korea/North Korea (Joint Bid) are the official bidders.

The key dates of the bidding process are:[1][2][3][4]

  • 15 March 2019: Deadline to submit the completed expression of interest form to FIFA
  • 18 March 2019: FIFA to dispatch the bidding registration and overview documents
  • 16 April 2019: Deadline to submit the completed bidding registration to FIFA
  • 18 April 2019: FIFA to dispatch hosting documents to the member associations that have returned the bidding registration by the above deadline
  • August 2019: Circular to be sent out for current bidding member associations to reconfirm their interest, and any other eligible member associations to express their interest in bidding
  • 16 August 2019: Deadline for new member associations to submit the completed expression of interest form to FIFA
  • 2 September 2019: Deadline to submit the completed bidding registration to FIFA by new interested member associations, and re-confirmation from current bidders
  • 3 September 2019: FIFA dispatches the updated bidding registration and overview documents
  • 13 December 2019: New deadline to submit the completed bidding registration to FIFA
  • January/February 2020: Inspection visits to the member associations
  • April 2020: FIFA will publish the bid evaluation reports
  • May 2020: Expected appointment date of the host(s) by the FIFA Council; it will be decided by 37 FIFA board members whose ballots will be published after the vote

It will be decided by 37 FIFA board members in a secret ballot (a different format to the voting process for the 2026 Men's World Cup).[5][6] The bidding timeline was adjusted following the confirmation of the expanded tournament.[7]

Official candidatesEdit

AFCEdit

Asia has hosted the tournament twice, in 1991 and 2007, both in   China.

  Australia

In 2017 it was first announced that the Australian Government was funding a feasibility study to host the 2023 Women's World Cup.[8] Further funding was put into the bid in early 2018 by Federal Minister for Sport Bridget McKenzie as the government confirmed they were pledging an extra 4 million for it.[9][10] The bid was officially launched on 29 October 2018 with the campaign slogan "#GetOnside".[11] Australia unveiled its logo and slogan: "Limitless" was launched on 8 July 2019.[12]

  Japan

Japan have considered bidding on the tournament after declining their initial intention to bid on the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. Japan Football Association Vice president Kozo Tashima is reported to have said that the facilities will be renovated and ready for the World Cup.[13] On 20 February 2019 The Japan Football Association announced that it will go forward with a long-planned bid to host the 2023 Women's World Cup.[14] On 5 July 2019 Japan unveiled its bid logo along with the slogan "Time to Fly".[15]

  South Korea (expressing interest in a joint bid with   North Korea)

On 4 March 2019, the Korea Football Association announced that South Korea is planning a joint bid with North Korea to host the 2023 event and hopes to be the first to be hosted by more than one country.[16]

CAFEdit

Africa has never hosted the tournament.

  South Africa

On 4 June 2018, The South African Football Association announced that they will bid for the event of 2023. Having previously hosted the 2010 FIFA World Cup, it is hoping to play host to the first ever Women's World Cup held in the African continent.[17] South Africa agreed to officially launch the bid after South Africa qualified for the Women's World Cup for the first time on 3 December 2018 for the 2019 event. as of December 2018 they were set to bid.[18] On 21 February 2019 South Africa announced it will put forward to the 2023 bid.[19]

CONMEBOLEdit

South America has never hosted the tournament.

  Argentina

Argentina has formally submitted an expression of interest.[20]

  Brazil

Brazil has formally submitted an expression of interest.[20]

  Colombia

In 2016 the Colombian Football Federation indicated an interest to formalize the candidacy of Colombia as host country.[21] Colombia has previously hosted the 2011 FIFA U-20 World Cup and the 2016 FIFA Futsal World Cup.[22][23] One of the requirements to host the World Cup is to have a national women's league, and in 2017 the Colombian Women's Football League played its first season.[24] On 26 January 2019, Colombian President Iván Duque Márquez indicated that he has every intention of applying for Colombia to host the 2023 Women's World Cup.[25]

OFCEdit

Oceania has never hosted the tournament.

  New Zealand

Prior to their hosting of the 2015 FIFA U-20 World Cup, New Zealand officials expressed interest in bidding for the hosting rights of the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup.[26] FIFA's director of tournaments, Colin Smith, called New Zealand a "major contender" to host the Women's World Cup should they bid.[27] on 25 February 2019 New Zealand Football announced that it will put forward to bid for 2023.[28]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "FIFA starts bidding process for FIFA Women's World Cup 2023". FIFA. 19 February 2019.
  2. ^ "FIFA Council decides on key steps for upcoming international tournaments". FIFA.com. 15 March 2019.
  3. ^ "Bidding process for FIFA Women's World Cup 2023 continues with eight member associations". FIFA.com. 3 September 2019.
  4. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup 2023: Overview of the bidding process (updated version, August 2019)" (PDF). FIFA.com. 3 September 2019.
  5. ^ "Unlike men's World Cup, no open vote on women's event host". New Delhi Times. 21 February 2019. Retrieved 22 February 2019.
  6. ^ "FIFA to make public the vote for 2023 Women's World Cup". Associated Press. 16 March 2019. Retrieved 24 June 2019.
  7. ^ "FIFA Council unanimously approves expanded 32-team field for FIFA Women's World Cup". FIFA. 31 July 2019. Retrieved 31 July 2019.
  8. ^ "Australia to bid for 2023 Women's World Cup, Federal Government to support FFA". ABC News. 13 June 2017.
  9. ^ "Federal government commits $4 million to Australia's 2023 Women's World Cup bid". News AU. News AU. Retrieved 13 August 2018.
  10. ^ "Australian Government confirms ongoing support for FIFA Women's World Cup bid". Football Federation Australia. 6 February 2018.
  11. ^ "Get Onside: The FFA launches its bid for Australia to host the 2023 Women's World Cup". Fox Sports. 29 October 2018.
  12. ^ "'Limitless': FFA releases logo, slogan for 2023 Women's World Cup bid". Brisbane Times. 8 July 2019.
  13. ^ "Japan to bid for 2023 Women's World Cup". The Japan Times. 1 February 2015.
  14. ^ "Football: Japan to bid for 2023 Women's World Cup, Nadeshiko enter camp". Kyodo News. 20 February 2019.
  15. ^ "Japan Reveals Official Logo of Bid to Host 2023 Women's World Cup". JFA.jp. 5 July 2019.
  16. ^ "North and South Korea could make joint bid for 2023 Women's World Cup, says FIFA president". Sky News. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  17. ^ "South Africa line up 2023 Women's World Cup bid". ESPN. 1 June 2018. Retrieved 27 June 2018.
  18. ^ "Reports: Safa set to bid for 2023 Fifa Women's World Cup". goal.com. 3 December 2018. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  19. ^ "Safa begin process to host 2023 Women's World Cup". Mail Guardian. Retrieved 21 February 2019.
  20. ^ a b "FIFA receives record number of expressions of interest in hosting FIFA Women's World Cup 2023™". FIFA.com. 18 March 2019. Retrieved 19 March 2019.
  21. ^ "Colombia se postula para ser sede del Mundial Femenino 2023" [Colombia is postulated to host the 2023 Women's World Cup]. Gol Caracol (in Spanish). 23 August 2016. Retrieved 23 August 2016.
  22. ^ "Federación presentó la petición de ser sede del Mundial femenino 2023". Futbolred (in Spanish). 23 August 2016.
  23. ^ "Liga Colombiana en 2017 y Mundial Femenino en marcha". GOAL Colombia. 23 August 2016.
  24. ^ "Colombia tendrá liga femenina de fútbol". Eltiempo.com (in Spanish). 20 October 2016.
  25. ^ "Colombia se postulará ante la FIFA para organizar el Mundial Femenino de 2023" (in Spanish). 26 January 2019.
  26. ^ "New Zealand Football seek to host Fifa Women's World Cup in 2023". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 1 July 2015.
  27. ^ "Fifa boss welcomes New Zealand's interest in hosting 2023 Women's World Cup". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 1 July 2015.
  28. ^ "New Zealand Football to express interest in hosting 2023 Fifa Women's World Cup". Stuff.co.nz. 26 February 2019.

External linksEdit