2021 UEFA European Under-21 Championship

The 2021 UEFA European Under-21 Championship (also known as UEFA Under-21 Euro 2021) was the 23rd edition of the UEFA European Under-21 Championship (26th edition if the Under-23 era is also included), the biennial international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the men's under-21 national teams of Europe. Initially, 12 teams were to play in the tournament, however on 6 February 2019, UEFA's executive committee increased this number to 16.[2] Only players born on or after 1 January 1998 were eligible to participate.[3]

2021 UEFA European Under-21 Championship
2021-es U21-es labdarúgó-Európa-bajnokság
(in Hungarian)
Evropsko prvenstvo v nogometu do 21 let 2021
(in Slovene)
2021 UEFA European Under-21 Championship.png
Tournament details
Host countriesHungary
Slovenia
Dates24–31 March 2021 (group stage)
31 May – 6 June 2021 (knockout stage)
Teams16 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)8 (in 8 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Germany (3rd title)
Runners-up Portugal
Tournament statistics
Matches played31
Goals scored83 (2.68 per match)
Attendance13,413 (433 per match)
Top scorer(s)Germany Lukas Nmecha
(4 goals)
Best player(s)Portugal Fábio Vieira[1]
2019
2023

The tournament was co-hosted by Hungary and Slovenia. It was originally scheduled to take place from 9 to 26 June 2021.[4] However, the tournament was rescheduled following the postponement of UEFA Euro 2020 to June/July 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[5] The new dates were to be decided initially on 27 May 2020,[6] but then postponed to 17 June 2020,[7] where the UEFA Executive Committee meeting discussed the calendar and format of the tournament.[8] On 17 June 2020, UEFA announced the tournament would be played in two stages; the group stage, which took place from 24 to 31 March 2021, and the knockout stage, which took place from 31 May to 6 June 2021.[9][10][11] Due to COVID-19 Pandemic the VAR system wasn't used.

Spain were the defending champions, but were eliminated in the knockout phase by Portugal.

Host selectionEdit

The following associations indicated their interests to bid for the tournament:

Hungary and Slovenia were appointed as co-hosts at the UEFA Executive Committee meeting in Dublin, Republic of Ireland on 3 December 2018.[4][14]

QualificationEdit

All 55 UEFA nations entered the competition, and, unlike the last competition, co-hosts Hungary and Slovenia qualified automatically, and the other 53 teams competed in the qualifying competition to determine the remaining 14 spots in the final tournament. The draw for the qualifying group stage was held on 11 December 2018.[15] The qualifying group stage took place from March 2019 to October 2020, while the play-offs were set to take place in November 2020.[3] The qualifying competition would originally consist of two rounds:[3]

  • Qualifying group stage: The 53 teams were drawn into nine groups: eight groups of six teams and one group of five teams. Each group was played in home-and-away round-robin format. The nine group winners and the best runner-up (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) qualified directly for the final tournament, while the remaining eight runners-up advance to the play-offs.
  • Play-offs: The eight teams were drawn into four ties to play home-and-away two-legged matches to determine the last four qualified teams.

However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe which caused the postponement of matches in the qualifying group stage, UEFA announced on 17 June 2020 that the play-offs would be cancelled. Instead, the nine group winners and the five best runners-up (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) qualified for the final tournament.[9][10][11]

Qualified teamsEdit

The following teams qualified for the final tournament.

Note: All appearance statistics include only U-21 era (since 1978).

Team Method of qualification Date of qualification Appearance Last appearance Previous best performance
  Hungary Co-hosts 3 December 2018 5th 1996 (quarter-finals) Semi-finals (1986)
  Slovenia Co-hosts 3 December 2018 1st Debut
  Russia Group 5 winners 13 October 2020 4th (7th incl. Soviet Union) 2013 (group stage) Champions (1980, 1990)
  Switzerland Group 2 runners-up[^] 13 October 2020 4th 2011 (runners-up) Runners-up (2011)
  Netherlands Group 7 winners 13 October 2020 8th 2013 (semi-finals) Champions (2006, 2007)
  Denmark Group 8 winners 13 October 2020 9th 2019 (group stage) Semi-finals (1992, 2015)
  Spain Group 6 winners 13 October 2020 15th 2019 (champions) Champions (1986, 1998, 2011, 2013, 2019)
  England Group 3 winners 13 October 2020 16th 2019 (group stage) Champions (1982, 1984)
  France Group 2 winners 12 November 2020 10th 2019 (semi-finals) Champions (1988)
  Italy Group 1 winners 15 November 2020 21st 2019 (group stage) Champions (1992, 1994, 1996, 2000, 2004)
  Portugal Group 7 runners-up[^] 15 November 2020 9th 2017 (group stage) Runners-up (1994, 2015)
  Czech Republic Group 4 winners 17 November 2020 8th (14th incl. Czechoslovakia) 2017 (group stage) Champions (2002)
  Germany Group 9 winners 17 November 2020 13th 2019 (runners-up) Champions (2009, 2017)
  Croatia Group 4 runners-up[^] 17 November 2020 4th 2019 (group stage) Group stage (2000, 2004, 2019)
  Romania Group 8 runners-up[^] 17 November 2020 3rd 2019 (semi-finals) Semi-finals (2019)
  Iceland Group 1 runners-up[^] 24 November 2020 2nd 2011 (group stage) Group stage (2011)
Notes
  1. ^
    The best five runners-up among all nine groups qualified for the final tournament.

Final drawEdit

The final draw was held on 10 December 2020, 15:00 CET, at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland.[16] The sixteen teams were drawn into four groups of four teams. The teams were seeded according to their coefficient ranking following the end of the qualifying stage, calculated based on the following:[3]

The hosts Hungary and Slovenia were assigned to position A1 and B1 respectively in the draw, while the other fourteen teams were drawn to the other available positions in their group.[17]

Pot 1
Team Coeff[17]
  Spain 40,620
  Germany 38,490
  France 37,147
  England 36,846
Pot 2
Team Coeff[17]
  Italy 36,361
  Denmark 36,088
  Portugal 35,863
  Netherlands 32,686
Pot 3
Team Coeff[17]
  Romania 32,198
  Croatia 31,902
  Czech Republic 29,648
  Russia 29,162
Pot 4
Team Coeff[17]
  Switzerland 28,059
  Iceland 26,071
  Slovenia (position B1) 25,851
  Hungary (position A1) 21,318

VenuesEdit

The following were the venues where the competition was played:[18]

  Hungary
Székesfehérvár Szombathely Budapest Győr
MOL Aréna Sóstó

(Aréna Sóstó)[18]

Haladás Sportkomplexum

(Haladás Stadion)[18]

Bozsik Aréna Ménfői úti Stadion

(Gyirmóti Stadion)[18]

Capacity: 14,000[18] Capacity: 8,900[18] Capacity: 8,468[18] Capacity: 4,335[18]
       
 
 
Székesfehérvár
 
Budapest
 
Szombathely
 
Győr

Locations of stadiums in Hungary

 
 
Ljubljana
 
Celje
 
Maribor
 
Koper

Locations of stadiums in Slovenia

  Slovenia
Ljubljana Celje Maribor Koper
Stožice Stadium Stadion Z'dežele

(Stadion Celje)[18]

Ljudski vrt Bonifika Stadium
Capacity: 16,100[19] Capacity: 13,600[20] Capacity: 12,702[21] Capacity: 4,010[22]
       

The provisional schedule was announced in November 2019, with the above eight venues hosting matches.[23] Hungary (Groups A and C) and Slovenia (Groups B and D) would both host two groups, two quarter-finals and one semi-final each, while the final would be played in Slovenia at the Stožice Stadium, Ljubljana.[24]

Match officialsEdit

Country Referee 1st assistant referee 2nd assistant referee
  Belgium Lawrence Visser Thibaud Nijssen Ruben Wyns
  Bosnia and Herzegovina Irfan Peljto Davor Beljo Senad Ibrišimbegović
  Spain Guillermo Cuadra Fernández Íñigo Prieto López de Cerain José Enrique Naranjo Pérez
  Italy Maurizio Mariani Alberto Tegoni Daniele Bindoni
  Switzerland Sandro Schärer Stéphane De Almeida Bekim Zogaj
  Turkey Halil Umut Meler Mustafa Emre Eyisoy Abdullah Bora Özkara
  France François Letexier Cyril Mugnier Mehdi Rahmouni
  Georgia Giorgi Kruashvili Levan Varamishvili Zaza Pipia
  Germany Harm Osmers Eduard Beitinger Dominik Schaal
  Netherlands Dennis Higler Joost van Zuilen Johan Balder
  Poland Bartosz Frankowski Jakub Winkler Dawid Golis
  Sweden Glenn Nyberg Mahbod Beigi Andreas Söderkvist

Fourth officials

SquadsEdit

Each national team had to submit a squad of 23 players, three of whom had to be goalkeepers. If a player was injured or ill severely enough to prevent his participation in the tournament before his team's first match, he could be replaced by another player.[3]

Group stageEdit

The group winners and runners-up advanced to the quarter-finals.

Tiebreakers

In the group stage, teams were ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss), and if tied on points, the following tiebreaking criteria were applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings (Regulations Articles 18.01 and 18.02):[3]

  1. Points in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  2. Goal difference in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  3. Goals scored in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  4. If more than two teams were tied, and after applying all head-to-head criteria above, a subset of teams were still tied, all head-to-head criteria above were reapplied exclusively to this subset of teams;
  5. Goal difference in all group matches;
  6. Goals scored in all group matches;
  7. Penalty shoot-out if only two teams had the same number of points, and they met in the last round of the group and were tied after applying all criteria above (not used if more than two teams had the same number of points, or if their rankings were not relevant for qualification for the next stage);
  8. Disciplinary points (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  9. UEFA coefficient ranking for the final draw.

All times are local, CET (UTC+1) for matches between 24 and 27 March 2021, CEST (UTC+2) for matches between 28 and 31 March 2021.

Group AEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Netherlands 3 1 2 0 8 3 +5 5[a] Advance to knockout stage
2   Germany 3 1 2 0 4 1 +3 5[a]
3   Romania 3 1 2 0 3 2 +1 5[a]
4   Hungary (H) 3 0 0 3 2 11 −9 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host
Notes:
  1. ^ a b c Tied on head-to-head points (2) and head-to-head goal difference (0). Head-to-head goals scored: Netherlands 2, Germany 1, Romania 1. Germany and Romania were ranked on overall goal difference.


Hungary  0–3  Germany
Report
  • Nmecha   61'
  • Baku   66', 73'
Romania  1–1  Netherlands
Report

Hungary  1–2  Romania
Report
Germany  1–1  Netherlands
Report

Netherlands  6–1  Hungary
Report
Germany  0–0  Romania
Report

Group BEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Spain 3 2 1 0 5 0 +5 7 Advance to knockout stage
2   Italy 3 1 2 0 5 1 +4 5
3   Czech Republic 3 0 2 1 2 4 −2 2
4   Slovenia (H) 3 0 1 2 1 8 −7 1
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Slovenia  0–3  Spain
Report
Czech Republic  1–1  Italy
Maggiore   75' (o.g.) Report Scamacca   31'

Slovenia  1–1  Czech Republic
Report
Spain  0–0  Italy
Report

Italy  4–0  Slovenia
Report
Spain  2–0  Czech Republic
Report

Group CEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Denmark 3 3 0 0 6 0 +6 9 Advance to knockout stage
2   France 3 2 0 1 4 1 +3 6
3   Russia 3 1 0 2 4 6 −2 3
4   Iceland 3 0 0 3 1 8 −7 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers


Russia  4–1  Iceland
Report Guðjohnsen   59'
France  0–1  Denmark
Report Dreyer   75'

Russia  0–2  France
Report
Iceland  0–2  Denmark
Report

Denmark  3–0  Russia
Report
Iceland  0–2  France
Report

Group DEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Portugal 3 3 0 0 6 0 +6 9 Advance to knockout stage
2   Croatia 3 1 0 2 4 5 −1 3[a]
3   Switzerland 3 1 0 2 3 6 −3 3[a]
4   England 3 1 0 2 2 4 −2 3[a]
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
Notes:
  1. ^ a b c Tied on head-to-head points (3) and head-to-head goal difference (0). Head-to-head goals scored: Croatia 4, Switzerland 3, England 2.


Portugal  1–0  Croatia
Vieira   68' Report
England  0–1  Switzerland
Report

Croatia  3–2  Switzerland
Report
Portugal  2–0  England
Report

Switzerland  0–3  Portugal
Report
Croatia  1–2  England
Report

Knockout stageEdit

In the knockout stage, extra time and a penalty shoot-out were used to decide the winners if necessary.[3]

BracketEdit

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
31 May – Budapest
 
 
  Netherlands2
 
3 June – Székesfehérvár
 
  France1
 
  Netherlands1
 
31 May – Székesfehérvár
 
  Germany2
 
  Denmark2 (5)
 
6 June – Ljubljana
 
  Germany (p)2 (6)
 
  Germany1
 
31 May – Maribor
 
  Portugal0
 
  Spain (a.e.t.)2
 
3 June – Maribor
 
  Croatia1
 
  Spain0
 
31 May – Ljubljana
 
  Portugal1
 
  Portugal (a.e.t.)5
 
 
  Italy3
 

Quarter-finalsEdit

Netherlands  2–1  France
Report
Attendance: 1,672[49]

Denmark  2–2 (a.e.t.)  Germany
Report
Penalties
5–6

Spain  2–1 (a.e.t.)  Croatia
Report
Attendance: 1,886[51]

Portugal  5–3 (a.e.t.)  Italy
Report

Semi-finalsEdit

Netherlands  1–2  Germany
Report

Spain  0–1  Portugal
Report
Attendance: 1,910[54]
Referee: Glenn Nyberg (Sweden)

FinalEdit

Germany  1–0  Portugal
Report

GoalscorersEdit

There were 83 goals scored in 31 matches, for an average of 2.68 goals per match.

4 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

1 own goal

AwardsEdit

The following awards were given at the conclusion of the tournament:

Team of the tournamentEdit

After the tournament the Under-21 Team of the Tournament was selected by the UEFA Technical Observers.[58]

Position Player
Goalkeepers   Andrei Vlad
  Marco Carnesecchi
  Diogo Costa
Defenders   David Raum
  Diogo Queirós
  Nico Schlotterbeck
  Mads Bech Sørensen
  Perr Schuurs
  Victor Nelsson
  Ridle Baku
  Jorge Cuenca
Midfielders   Fábio Vieira
  Dani de Wit
  Gonzalo Villar
  Vitinha
  Niklas Dorsch
  Denis Makarov
  Arne Maier
Forwards   Luka Ivanušec
  Lukas Nmecha
  Jacob Bruun Larsen
  Dany Mota
  Javi Puado

BroadcastingEdit

EuropeEdit

Country/region Broadcaster
Free Pay
  Austria ORF
  Belgium RTBF
  Bulgaria BNT
  Croatia HRT
  Czech Republic ČT
  Denmark DR
  France France Télévisions
  Hungary MTV
  Ireland Sky Sports
(YouTube, non-England games only)[59]
Sky Sports
(England games only)[60]
  United Kingdom
  Italy RAI
  Germany ProSiebenSat.1[61]
  Netherlands NOS (Netherlands games only and Final)[62]
  Russia Match TV
  Portugal RTP[63]
  Romania TVR[64]
  Slovenia RTV Slovenia
  Spain Mediaset España
  Sweden SVT[65]
  Switzerland SRG SSR
  Turkey TRT
  Ukraine UA:First

Outside EuropeEdit

Country/Region Broadcaster
  China Super Sports
  India Sony Six
  Japan Wowow
Latin America ESPN
Middle East beIN Sports
North Africa beIN Sports
  United States ESPN, TUDN

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe, the match was played behind closed doors.

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit