2021 ICC Men's T20 World Cup

The 2021 ICC Men's T20 World Cup is the seventh ICC Men's T20 World Cup tournament,[3][4] with the matches taking place in the United Arab Emirates and Oman from 17 October to 14 November 2021.[5][6] The West Indies are the defending champions.[7][8]

2021 ICC Men's T20 World Cup
Logo of ICC World T20.png
Dates17 October – 14 November 2021
Administrator(s)International Cricket Council
Cricket formatTwenty20 International
Tournament format(s)Group stage and knockout
Host(s) India[n 1]
 UAE
 Oman
Participants16[1]
Matches45[2]
Official websitet20worldcup.com
2016
2022

There was due to be a preceding 2020 T20 World Cup held in Australia from 18 October to 15 November 2020,[9][10][11] but in July 2020, the International Cricket Council (ICC) confirmed that this tournament had been postponed, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[12][13][14] In August 2020, the ICC confirmed that India would host the 2021 tournament as planned, with Australia being named as the host for the succeeding 2022 tournament.[15] However, in June 2021, the ICC announced that the tournament had been moved to the United Arab Emirates due to growing concerns over the COVID-19 pandemic situation in India, and a possible third wave of the pandemic in the country.[16] The tournament began on 17 October 2021,[5] with the tournament's final scheduled to be played on 14 November 2021.[17] The preliminary rounds of the tournament are being played in the UAE and Oman.[18]

Background

In April 2020, the ICC confirmed that despite the COVID-19 pandemic, the tournament was still planned to go ahead as scheduled.[19][20] However, the following month a senior ICC official said that it would be "too big a risk" to host the tournament in 2020,[21] The ICC also stated that reports of postponing the tournament were inaccurate, with multiple contingency plans being looked at.[22] A decision on the tournament was originally deferred until the ICC's meeting on 10 June 2020,[23] with a further announcement scheduled to be made in July 2020.[24] In June 2020, Earl Eddings, the chairman of Cricket Australia, said that it was "unlikely" and "unrealistic" that the tournament would take place in Australia as scheduled. Eddings also suggested that Australia could host the event in October 2021, and India stage the tournament a year later in 2022. The ICC also considered moving the tournament to be played around the next Women's ODI World Cup, which was originally scheduled to take place in New Zealand for February 2021.[25]

A month before the official postponement, Australian federal tourism minister Simon Birmingham announced that the Australian government expected that the country's borders would be closed to international travel until 2021.[26] The ICC also confirmed that either Australia or India, the hosts for the tournaments originally scheduled to take place in 2020 and 2021 respectively, would host this tournament.[27][28] In August 2020, the ICC confirmed that India are expected to host the 2021 tournament, with Australia expected to the 2022 tournament.[29] In the same month, the ICC confirmed that Sri Lanka and the United Arab Emirates were being considered as back-up venues for the tournament.[30] In April 2021, the ICC's CEO Geoff Allardice confirmed that back-up plans were still in place if India were unable to host the tournament due to the pandemic.[31] Later the same month, Dhiraj Malhotra of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) confirmed that the UAE would be used as a contingency,[32] if the pandemic in India continued to get worse.[33] The BCCI were also in talks with Oman as a potential co-host of the tournament.[34] On 1 June 2021, the ICC gave the BCCI the deadline of 28 June 2021 to make its decision on where the tournament would be played.[35] Regardless of the actual location of the tournament, the ICC also confirmed that the BCCI would remain as the hosts of the competition.[36] Later, the ICC confirmed that the tournament had been moved to the UAE and Oman.[6] It was the first time for both the UAE and Oman to be hosting a global ICC event, and also the first occasion that a cricket World Cup was being held entirely outside of the Test-playing nations.[37]

Less than two weeks before the start of the tournament, Oman was impacted by Cyclone Shaheen which passed only a few miles north of the tournament venue in Al-Amerat. Pankaj Khimji, chairman of Oman Cricket, stated that "we were so close to being virtually wiped out [...] had this had happened over here in this area, I’d have said goodbye to the World Cup".[38]

Teams and qualification

As of 31 December 2018, the top nine ranked ICC Full Members, alongside hosts India, qualified directly for the 2021 tournament.[39][40] Of those ten teams, the top eight ranked sides qualified for the Super 12s stage of the tournament.[39] Sri Lanka and Bangladesh did not qualify for the Super 12s, instead being placed in the group stage of the competition.[39] They were joined by the six teams who had qualified for the tournament via the 2019 ICC T20 World Cup Qualifier.[39] Of the teams in the ICC Men's T20I Team Rankings, the United Arab Emirates and Nepal could only qualify through regional competitions.[11] The top four teams from the group stage will then advance to the Super 12s.[39]

Papua New Guinea were the first team to secure their position via the Qualifier, after they won Group A of the tournament, finishing above the Netherlands on net run rate.[41] It was the first time that Papua New Guinea had qualified for a World Cup in any format.[42] Ireland became the second team to qualify via this route after they won Group B, also on net run rate.[43]

In the first match in the playoffs, the Netherlands qualified for the T20 World Cup when they beat the United Arab Emirates by eight wickets, after the UAE only scored 80 runs in their innings.[44] The second qualifier match saw Namibia advance to their first T20 World Cup after beating Oman by 54 runs.[45] Scotland beat tournament hosts the United Arab Emirates in the third qualifier by 90 runs to secure their place in the T20 World Cup.[46] Oman become the final team to qualify for the T20 World Cup, when they beat Hong Kong by 12 runs in the last playoff match.[47]

In August 2021, concerns and doubts were raised over the participation of Afghanistan cricket team in the tournament ever since Afghanistan was brought under the control of the Taliban.[48] Afghanistan's team media manager Hikmat Hassan confirmed that Afghanistan would play in the T20 World Cup, despite the political turmoil in the country.[49] On 6 October 2021, the Afghanistan team left Kabul, travelling to Doha, Qatar, for a training camp before the start of the tournament.[50]

Means of qualification Date Venue Berths Qualified
Host nation 7 August 2020 1   India
ICC Men's T20I Team Rankings
(Top 9 teams in rankings who played in the last WT20, excluding the hosts)[39]
31 December 2018 Various 9   Pakistan
  Australia
  England
  South Africa
  New Zealand
  West Indies
  Afghanistan
  Sri Lanka
  Bangladesh
2019 ICC Men's T20 World Cup Qualifier 18 October–3 November 2019   United Arab Emirates 6   Netherlands
  Papua New Guinea
  Ireland
  Namibia
  Scotland
  Oman
Total 16

Match officials

On 7 October 2021, the ICC named the match referees and the on-field umpires for the tournament.[51][52]

Match referees

Umpires

Squads

Each team selected a squad of 15 players before 10 October 2021.[53] Each team was also able to select up to seven additional players, if needed, with regards to COVID-19.[54] On 10 August 2021, New Zealand were the first team to announce their squad for the tournament.[55] All the teams announced their preliminary squads by 12 September 2021.[56]

Schedule and broadcasting

With a total of 45 matches, the T20 World Cup will be composed of two rounds. Round 1 will include twelve matches between eight teams (Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Ireland, Netherlands, Scotland, Namibia, Oman and Papua New Guinea) from which four teams will progress to the Super 12s.[57] The Super 12s, scheduled to start from 24 October 2021, will consist of 30 matches between the four teams from Round 1 and the top eight ranked T20I teams. Those teams will be split into two groups of six each. This will be followed by the two semi-finals and then the final.[5] On 16 July 2021, the ICC confirmed the groups for the tournament,[58] which were decided on the rankings of the teams as of 20 March 2021.[59] On 17 August 2021, the ICC confirmed the final fixtures for the tournament including the first round and super 12 matches.[60]

The ICC named all of the official broadcasters for the tournament on its website, including details on television coverage, digital content for in-match clips and highlights, and audio listings.[61]

Venues

On 17 April 2021, the BCCI proposed the name of the cities which are scheduled to be hosting the matches.[62] Bangalore, Chennai, Dharamshala, Hyderabad, Kolkata, Lucknow, Mumbai, and New Delhi were the venues along with Ahmedabad, hosting the final of the event.[63] On 18 April 2021, it was announced that Pakistan would play two of their group matches in Delhi, while Mumbai and Kolkata would host the semi-finals.[64] On 28 June 2021, BCCI President Sourav Ganguly confirmed that due to the COVID-19 situation in the country the board has officially communicated to the ICC about their decision to move the event from India to the UAE.[65] Some of the preliminary round matches of the event are also set to be held in Oman.[66][67] On 29 June 2021, the ICC confirmed that the T20 World Cup would be played in the UAE and Oman.[68] The tournament will take place in four venues: the Dubai International Cricket Stadium, the Sheikh Zayed Cricket Stadium, the Sharjah Cricket Stadium, and the Oman Cricket Academy Ground.[69] During July 2021, the Tolerance Oval in Abu Dhabi was awaiting accreditation by the ICC to also be used as one of the venues for the tournament.[70]

  United Arab Emirates   Oman
Dubai Sharjah Abu Dhabi Muscat
Dubai International Cricket Stadium Sharjah Cricket Stadium Sheikh Zayed Cricket Stadium Oman Cricket Academy Ground
Capacity: 25,000[71] Capacity: 27,000[72] Capacity: 20,000[73] Capacity: 3,000[74]
       
Venues in UAE
Venues in Oman

Prize money

On 10 October 2021, the ICC announced the prize money for the tournament.[75]

Stage Prize money (US$) Teams/match Total
Winners $1.6 million 1 $1.6 million
Runner-up $800,000 1 $800,000
Losing semi-finalists $400,000 each 2 $800,000
Bonus for winning every "First round" match $40,000 per match 12 $480,000
Teams get knocked out in the "First round" $40,000 each 4 $160,000
Bonus for winning every "Super 12" match $40,000 per match 30 $1,200,000
Teams get knocked out in the "Super 12 stage" $70,000 each 8 $560,000
Total $5.6 million

Warm-up matches

First round

Group A

Pos Team Pld W L NR Pts NRR Qualification
1   Sri Lanka 1 1 0 0 2 2.607 Advance to Super 12
2   Ireland 1 1 0 0 2 1.755
3   Namibia 2 1 1 0 2 −1.163
4   Netherlands 2 0 2 0 0 −1.240
Updated to match(es) played on 20 October 2021. Source: icc-cricket.com


18 October
14:00
Scorecard
Netherlands  
106 (20 overs)
v
  Ireland
107/3 (15.1 overs)
Max O'Dowd 51 (47)
Curtis Campher 4/26 (4 overs)
Gareth Delany 44 (29)
Pieter Seelaar 1/14 (2.1 overs)
Ireland won by 7 wickets
Sheikh Zayed Cricket Stadium, Abu Dhabi
Umpires: Marais Erasmus (SA) and Rod Tucker (Aus)
Player of the match: Curtis Campher (Ire)
  • Netherlands won the toss and elected to bat.
  • Curtis Campher became the first bowler for Ireland to take a hat-trick in T20Is.[76]
  • Curtis Campher also became the third bowler to take four wickets in four balls in T20Is.[77]

18 October
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
Namibia  
96 (19.3 overs)
v
  Sri Lanka
100/3 (13.3 overs)
Craig Williams 29 (36)
Maheesh Theekshana 3/25 (4 overs)
Bhanuka Rajapaksa 42* (27)
JJ Smit 1/7 (1 over)
Sri Lanka won by 7 wickets
Sheikh Zayed Cricket Stadium, Abu Dhabi
Umpires: Adrian Holdstock (SA) and Paul Reiffel (Aus)
Player of the match: Maheesh Theekshana (SL)
  • Sri Lanka won the toss and elected to field.

20 October
14:00
Scorecard
Netherlands  
164/4 (20 overs)
v
  Namibia
166/4 (19 overs)
Max O'Dowd 70 (56)
Jan Frylinck 2/36 (4 overs)
David Wiese 66* (40)
Pieter Seelaar 1/8 (2 overs)
Namibia won by 6 wickets
Sheikh Zayed Cricket Stadium, Abu Dhabi
Umpires: Michael Gough (Eng) and Langton Rusere (Zim)
Player of the match: David Wiese (Nam)
  • Namibia won the toss and elected to field.

20 October
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
Sri Lanka  
171/7 (20 overs)
v
Wanindu Hasaranga 71 (47)
Josh Little 4/23 (4 overs)
Innings break
Sheikh Zayed Cricket Stadium, Abu Dhabi
Umpires: Nitin Menon (Ind) and Paul Wilson (Aus)
  • Ireland won the toss and elected to field.

22 October
14:00
Scorecard
v

22 October
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
v

Group B

Pos Team Pld W L NR Pts NRR Qualification
1   Scotland 2 2 0 0 4 0.575 Advance to Super 12
2   Oman 2 1 1 0 2 0.613
3   Bangladesh 2 1 1 0 2 0.500
4   Papua New Guinea 2 0 2 0 0 −1.867
Updated to match(es) played on 19 October 2021. Source: icc-cricket.com


17 October
14:00
Scorecard
Papua New Guinea  
129/9 (20 overs)
v
  Oman
131/0 (13.4 overs)
Assad Vala 56 (43)
Zeeshan Maqsood 4/20 (4 overs)
Oman won by 10 wickets
Oman Cricket Academy Ground Turf 1, Muscat
Umpires: Kumar Dharmasena (SL) and Chris Gaffaney (NZ)
Player of the match: Zeeshan Maqsood (Oma)

17 October
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
Scotland  
140/9 (20 overs)
v
  Bangladesh
134/7 (20 overs)
Chris Greaves 45 (28)
Mahedi Hasan 3/19 (4 overs)
Mushfiqur Rahim 38 (36)
Brad Wheal 3/24 (4 overs)
Scotland won by 6 runs
Oman Cricket Academy Ground Turf 1, Muscat
Umpires: Richard Kettleborough (Eng) and Ahsan Raza (Pak)
Player of the match: Chris Greaves (Sco)

19 October
14:00
Scorecard
Scotland  
165/9 (20 overs)
v
  Papua New Guinea
148 (19.3 overs)
Richie Berrington 70 (49)
Kabua Morea 4/31 (4 overs)
Norman Vanua 47 (37)
Josh Davey 4/18 (3.3 overs)
Scotland won by 17 runs
Oman Cricket Academy Ground Turf 1, Muscat
Umpires: Kumar Dharmasena (SL) and Richard Kettleborough (Eng)
Player of the match: Richie Berrington (Sco)
  • Scotland won the toss and elected to bat.

19 October
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
Bangladesh  
153 (20 overs)
v
  Oman
127/9 (20 overs)
Mohammad Naim 64 (50)
Bilal Khan 3/18 (4 overs)
Jatinder Singh 40 (33)
Mustafizur Rahman 4/36 (4 overs)
Bangladesh won by 26 runs
Oman Cricket Academy Ground Turf 1, Muscat
Umpires: Chris Gaffaney (NZ) and Ahsan Raza (Pak)
Player of the match: Shakib Al Hasan (Ban)
  • Bangladesh won the toss and elected to bat.


21 October
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
Oman  
v

Super 12

Qualification Country
Host   India
Rankings   Afghanistan
  Australia
  England
  New Zealand
  Pakistan
  South Africa
  West Indies
Advanced from first round TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD

Group 1

Pos Team Pld W L NR Pts NRR Qualification
1   Australia 0 0 0 0 0 Advance to Knockout Stage
2   England 0 0 0 0 0
3   South Africa 0 0 0 0 0
4   West Indies 0 0 0 0 0
5   A1 0 0 0 0 0
6   B2 0 0 0 0 0
First match(es) will be played on 23 October 2021. Source: icc-cricket.com


23 October
14:00
Scorecard
v

23 October
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
v

24 October
14:00 (N)
Scorecard
  A1
v
  B2


27 October
14:00
Scorecard
v
  B2

28 October
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
v
  A1

29 October
14:00
Scorecard
v
  B2

30 October
14:00
Scorecard
v
  A1

30 October
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
v

1 November
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
v
  A1

2 November
14:00
Scorecard
v
  B2

4 November
14:00
Scorecard
v
  B2

4 November
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
v
  A1


6 November
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
v

Group 2

Pos Team Pld W L NR Pts NRR Qualification
1   Afghanistan 0 0 0 0 0 Advance to Knockout Stage
2   India 0 0 0 0 0
3   New Zealand 0 0 0 0 0
4   Pakistan 0 0 0 0 0
5   A2 0 0 0 0 0
6   B1 0 0 0 0 0
First match(es) will be played on 24 October 2021. Source: icc-cricket.com


24 October
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
India  
v

25 October
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
v
  B1


27 October
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
  B1
v
  A2

29 October
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
v

31 October
14:00
Scorecard
v
  A2


2 November
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
v
  A2

3 November
14:00
Scorecard
v
  B1

3 November
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
India  
v

5 November
14:00
Scorecard
v
  A2

5 November
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
India  
v
  B1


7 November
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
v
  B1

8 November
18:00 (N)
Scorecard
India  
v
  A2

Knockout Stage

Semi-finals Final
      
1 Team A1
4 Team B2
Winner semi-final 1
Winner semi-final 2
2 Team A2
3 Team B1

Semi-finals

10 November
18:00 (D/N)
Scorecard
TBD
v
TBD

11 November
18:00 (D/N)
Scorecard
TBD
v
TBD

Final

14 November
18:00 (D/N)
Scorecard
TBD
v
TBD

Notes

  1. ^ The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) retained the hosting rights to the tournament, with the matches taking place in the UAE and Oman.

References

  1. ^ "Ganguly, Sawhney and Shah get countdown to ICC Men's T20 World Cup 2021 underway". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  2. ^ "Australia is next with two T20 World Cups coming in 2020". International Cricket Council. Archived from the original on 25 November 2018. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  3. ^ "World T20 renamed as T20 World Cup". International Cricket Council. Archived from the original on 23 November 2018. Retrieved 24 November 2018.
  4. ^ "World T20 to be called T20 World Cup from 2020 edition: ICC". Archived from the original on 24 November 2018. Retrieved 24 November 2018.
  5. ^ a b c "T20 World Cup set to begin on October 17 in UAE; final on November 14". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 25 June 2021.
  6. ^ a b "ICC Men's T20 World Cup shifted to UAE, Oman". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 29 June 2021.
  7. ^ "Brathwaite sixes take WI to thrilling title win". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 3 April 2016.
  8. ^ "World Twenty20: West Indies beat England to claim second title". BBC Sport. Retrieved 3 April 2016.
  9. ^ "Australia and New Zealand to host World Twenty20 in 2020". abcnet.au. 10 February 2015. Archived from the original on 25 October 2015. Retrieved 10 February 2015.
  10. ^ "IPL now has window in ICC Future Tours Programme". ESPN Cricinfo. 12 December 2017. Archived from the original on 13 December 2017. Retrieved 12 December 2017.
  11. ^ a b "The road to the men's ICC World T20 Australia 2020 heads to Kuwait as regional qualification groups are confirmed". International Cricket Council. Archived from the original on 20 April 2018. Retrieved 20 April 2018.
  12. ^ "Men's T20 World Cup postponement FAQs". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  13. ^ "Men's 2020 T20 World Cup postponed because of coronavirus". BBC Sport. 20 July 2020. Retrieved 21 July 2020.
  14. ^ "ICC postpones T20 World Cup due to Covid-19 pandemic". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 21 July 2020.
  15. ^ "Venue for postponed 2020 ICC Men's T20 World Cup confirmed". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 7 August 2020.
  16. ^ http://bitwize.com.lb, Bitwize-. "Oman cricket ground cleared to hold Twenty20 World Cup matches". Times of Oman. Retrieved 25 June 2021.
  17. ^ "ICC T20 World Cup 2021 to take place in UAE from October 17". SportsTiger. Retrieved 28 June 2021.
  18. ^ Acharya, Shayan. "T20 World Cup set to begin on October 17 in UAE; final on November 14". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 25 June 2021.
  19. ^ "ICC update following Chief Executives' meeting". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 23 April 2020.
  20. ^ "Men's T20 World Cup and Women's 50-over World Cup plans ongoing - ICC". BBC Sport. Retrieved 23 April 2020.
  21. ^ "T20 World Cup would be 'too big a risk' in 2020". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  22. ^ "ICC statement on election of next Chair". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  23. ^ "ICC defers decision on 2020 T20 World Cup to June 10". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 28 May 2020.
  24. ^ "ICC Board update". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  25. ^ "T20 World Cup 'unrealistic' and 'unlikely' this year - Cricket Australia chairman". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 16 June 2020.
  26. ^ Macmillan, Jade (17 June 2020). "Australian borders likely to stay closed until next year, Tourism Minister says". abc.net.au. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 17 June 2020.
  27. ^ "ICC Men's T20 World Cup in Australia postponed". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  28. ^ "World Cup call paves the way for summer like no other". Cricket Australia. Retrieved 21 July 2020.
  29. ^ "Men's T20WC 2021 in India, 2022 in Australia; Women's CWC postponed". International Cricket Council. 7 August 2020. Retrieved 25 September 2020.
  30. ^ "Sri Lanka, UAE among back-up venues for 2021 T20 World Cup". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 12 August 2020.
  31. ^ "ICC CEO Geoff Allardice: 'Back-up plans' in place if India cannot host T20 World Cup". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 7 April 2021.
  32. ^ "T20 World Cup could be moved to United Arab Emirates, says BCCI". BBC Sport. Retrieved 29 April 2021.
  33. ^ "BCCI mulls moving T20 World Cup to UAE in 'worst case scenario'". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 30 April 2021.
  34. ^ "Oman in the fray to co-host T20 World Cup". CricBuzz. Retrieved 5 June 2021.
  35. ^ "ICC gives BCCI June 28 deadline for T20 World Cup decision". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 1 June 2021.
  36. ^ "ICC announces expansion of global events". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 1 June 2021.
  37. ^ Radley, Paul (29 June 2021). "T20 World Cup will move to UAE and Oman, confirms ICC". The National. Archived from the original on 3 July 2021. Retrieved 3 July 2021.
  38. ^ "Oman faced losing cricket World Cup due to Cyclone Shaheen". Al-Jazeera. 6 October 2021. Retrieved 9 October 2021.
  39. ^ a b c d e f "Direct qualifiers for ICC Men's T20 World Cup 2020 confirmed". International Cricket Council. Archived from the original on 1 January 2019. Retrieved 1 January 2019.
  40. ^ "Afghanistan earn direct qualification in 2020 T20 World Cup". ESPN Cricinfo. January 2019. Archived from the original on 1 January 2019. Retrieved 1 January 2019.
  41. ^ "Vanua, Bau dig PNG out of 19 for 6 hole to seal T20 World Cup qualification". ESPN Cricinfo. Archived from the original on 27 October 2019. Retrieved 27 October 2019.
  42. ^ "PNG make history, secure qualification for Men's T20 World Cup 2020". International Cricket Council. Archived from the original on 27 October 2019. Retrieved 27 October 2019.
  43. ^ "Ireland qualify for T20 World Cup after Jersey shock Oman". RTE. Retrieved 27 October 2019.
  44. ^ "UAE beaten by Netherlands as T20 World Cup hopes hang in the balance". The National. Archived from the original on 29 October 2019. Retrieved 29 October 2019.
  45. ^ "Smit, spinners carry Namibia to historic first T20 World Cup". International Cricket Council. Archived from the original on 29 October 2019. Retrieved 29 October 2019.
  46. ^ "T20 World Cup Qualifier: Scotland beat UAE to qualify for finals". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 30 October 2019. Retrieved 30 October 2019.
  47. ^ "Oman come from behind against Hong Kong to claim T20 World Cup spot". International Cricket Council. Archived from the original on 30 October 2019. Retrieved 30 October 2019.
  48. ^ "'Afghanistan Will Play in ICC Men's T20 World Cup 2021'". news18.com. Retrieved 17 August 2021.
  49. ^ "Afghanistan will play T20 World Cup, preparations are on: Media manager". The Times of India. Retrieved 17 August 2021.
  50. ^ "Andy Flower named Afghanistan consultant for T20 World Cup". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 9 October 2021.
  51. ^ "20-strong contingent of match officials announced for ICC Men's T20 World Cup 2021". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 7 October 2021.
  52. ^ "ICC T20 World Cup 2021 Match Official Appointments" (PDF). ICC. Retrieved 9 October 2021.
  53. ^ "T20 World Cup: Full squad list for tournament in UAE and Oman". BBC Sport. Retrieved 9 September 2021.
  54. ^ "Limit on squads at ICC events increased to 30 in response to Covid-19". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 17 August 2021.
  55. ^ "New Zealand name T20WC squad within 32-man group for Asian expedition". ICC. Retrieved 19 August 2021.
  56. ^ "Men's T20 World Cup 2021 - what the squads look like". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 13 September 2021.
  57. ^ "T20 World Cup group stages preview: A team-by-team breakdown". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 17 July 2021.
  58. ^ "ICC Men's T20 World Cup groups announced". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  59. ^ "T20 World Cup 2021: India and Pakistan to face off in Super 12s". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  60. ^ "ICC Men's T20 World Cup 2021 fixtures revealed". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 17 August 2021.
  61. ^ "Fans worldwide invited to 'Live The Game' via unparalleled coverage of ICC Men's T20 World Cup 2021". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 18 October 2021.
  62. ^ "BCCI proposes nine venues for men's T20 World Cup to ICC". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 20 April 2021.
  63. ^ "BCCI picks nine venues for ICC T20 World Cup 2021 to be held in India: Reports". Hindustan Times. 17 April 2021. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  64. ^ "Delhi to host 2 Pakistan ties, Ahmedabad final of T20 World Cup". News18. 18 April 2021. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  65. ^ "ICC T20 World Cup 2021 to take place in UAE from October 17". SportsTiger. Retrieved 28 June 2021.
  66. ^ "ICC T20 World Cup to be played in UAE and Oman from October 17: report". geo.tv. Retrieved 28 June 2021.
  67. ^ http://bitwize.com.lb, Bitwize-. "T20 World Cup to kick off on October 17 in UAE, final on November 14: Report". Times of Oman. Retrieved 28 June 2021.
  68. ^ "T20 World Cup to take place in UAE and Oman, confirms ICC". SportsTiger. Retrieved 29 June 2021.
  69. ^ "ICC Men's T20 World Cup shifted to UAE, Oman". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 29 June 2021.
  70. ^ "'Broadcast-ready' Tolerance Oval part of Abu Dhabi Cricket expansion". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 July 2021.
  71. ^ "T20 world cup venue guide Dubai International Stadium". t20worldcup.com. Retrieved 13 September 2021.
  72. ^ "Sharjah Cricket Stadium". t20worldcup.com. Retrieved 11 September 2021.
  73. ^ "T20 world cup venue guide Sheikh Zayed Cricket Stadium". t20worldcup.com. Retrieved 13 September 2021.
  74. ^ "Oman Cricket Academy Ground". t20worldcup.com. Retrieved 11 September 2021.
  75. ^ "ICC Men's T20 World Cup 2021 Prize Money details announced". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 10 October 2021.
  76. ^ "Curtis Campher takes four wickets in four balls vs Netherlands in T20 World Cup". SportStar. Retrieved 18 October 2021.
  77. ^ "Ireland pacer Curtis Campher becomes third bowler to take four wickets in four balls in T20Is". ANI News. Retrieved 18 October 2021.
  78. ^ "Shakib Al Hasan becomes leading wicket-taker in T20Is". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 17 October 2021.

External links