January 2021 Baghdad bombings

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The January 2021 Baghdad bombings was a terrorist attack that occurred on 21 January 2021, carried out by two suicide bombers at an open-air market in central Baghdad, Iraq.[1] They killed at least 32 people and injured another 110. The capital city hasn’t seen a terrorist attack since 2019.[2]

January 2021 Baghdad bombings
Part of the ISIL insurgency in Iraq
Baghdad bombings aftermath - Jan 2021 19.jpg
Baghdad bombings aftermath, the Market
Baghdad is located in Iraq
Baghdad
Baghdad
LocationBaghdad, Baghdad Governorate, Iraq
Date21 January 2021 (21 January 2021)
TargetShia Muslims
Attack type
Suicide bombing
WeaponsExplosive belt
Deaths34 (including two attackers)
Injured110
PerpetratorIslamic State of Iraq and the Levant
MotiveAnti-Shi'ism

BackgroundEdit

Since late 2017, the period in which the Islamic State was defeated, terrorist attacks in Iraq became rare. From 2003 to 2017, attacks were common in the entire country, with Baghdad and nearby cities being the main targets. The last major deadly attack against civilians, during the post-war period, occurred in January 2018 at the same location, leaving at least 35 people dead.[3]

AttackEdit

In the early hours of the morning, a clothing market in Tayaran Square, central Baghdad, was crowded as people were shopping after the market recently reopened, after being closed for about a year due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Iraq. An attacker entered and yelled “My stomach is hurting!" in Arabic. As nearby people got close to him, he pressed a detonator in his hand and blew himself up, killing several people.[4] A second suicide bomber then struck and killed people who were helping victims of the first bombing. 32 civilians were killed and more than 110 others wounded in the bombings, several of whom are in critical conditions.[5]

ResponsibilityEdit

Amaq News Agency credited Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant bombers.[6] The claim, which was released hours after the attack, stated that the organization targeted Shia Muslims. This was later backed up by an official statement from ISIL claiming responsibility for both attacks.[7][8]

AftermathEdit

The Kata'ib Hezbollah militia accused the United States, Israel and Saudi Arabia of being responsible for the attack, vowing to transfer the "battle" into Saudi Arabia.[9]

On 22 January 2021, missile and drone strikes targeted Saudi capital Riyadh. Iraqi militia “The True Promise Brigades” claimed responsibility and said the attacks were done as revenge for the bombings done by ISIL, which they accuse Riyadh of supporting.[10] Saudi government held the Yemeni Houthi movement responsible but the Houthis denied launching the strike.[11] On 28 January, Abu Yasser al-Issawi, a senior ISIS commander, was killed by Iraqi Armed Forces in Al-Chai Valley, southern Kirkuk.[12]

International reactionsEdit

Bahrain,[13] Canada,[14] Egypt,[14] France,[15] Iran,[14] Kuwait,[13] Jordan,[14] Lebanon,[14] Malaysia,[16] Tunisia,[14] Turkey,[17] Saudi Arabia,[13] the United Arab Emirates,[13] Qatar,[14] the United States,[14] Yemen,[14] as well as the partially recognised State of Palestine[14] condemned the attacks.

The Gulf Cooperation Council condemned the attack with the Secretary-General Nayef Al-Hajraf “offering condolences and sympathy to the families of the victims and wished the injured a speedy recovery.”[13]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Suicide Bombing in Crowded Baghdad Market Kills at Least 15". The New York Times. 21 January 2021. Archived from the original on 21 January 2021. Retrieved 21 January 2021.
  2. ^ Aqeel Najm, Jomana Karadsheh, Kareem Khadder and Tamara Qiblawi. "At least 32 killed as first suicide bombing in nearly 2 years rocks Baghdad". CNN. Archived from the original on 22 January 2021. Retrieved 22 January 2021.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  3. ^ "Iraq attack: Twin suicide bombings in central Baghdad kill 32". BBC News. 21 January 2021. Archived from the original on 21 January 2021. Retrieved 21 January 2021.
  4. ^ "First big suicide attack in Baghdad for three years kills at least 32". Reuters. 21 January 2021. Archived from the original on 23 January 2021. Retrieved 21 January 2021.
  5. ^ "Deadly twin suicide attack hits central Baghdad". Al Jazeera English. 21 January 2021. Archived from the original on 21 January 2021. Retrieved 21 January 2021.
  6. ^ "ISIL takes responsibility for deadly Baghdad suicide bombings". Al Jazeera English. 22 January 2021. Archived from the original on 22 January 2021. Retrieved 22 January 2021.
  7. ^ "Iraq bombing: IS says it was behind deadly suicide attacks in Baghdad". BBC News. 22 January 2021. Archived from the original on 22 January 2021. Retrieved 22 January 2021.
  8. ^ "Islamic State claims responsibility for Baghdad's suicide attack". Reuters. 22 January 2021. Archived from the original on 22 January 2021. Retrieved 22 January 2021.
  9. ^ "كتائب حزب الله: ثالوث الشر والسنة وراء مجزرة بغداد والسعودية ستدفع الثمن بانتقال الحرب لها". Rudaw Media Network. 22 January 2021. Retrieved 27 January 2021.
  10. ^ Welle (www.dw.com), Deutsche. "Will Saudi Arabia become a new drone battleground? | DW | 29.01.2021". DW.COM. Retrieved 1 February 2021.
  11. ^ "Saudi air defenses thwart new Houthi attack on Riyadh". Arab News. 22 January 2021. Retrieved 27 January 2021.
  12. ^ "Iraqi army kills 7 Daesh\ISIS terrorists, northern Iraq". Anadolu Agency. 27 January 2021.
  13. ^ a b c d e "Saudi Arabia, GCC condemn twin suicide bombing in central Baghdad". Arab News. 21 January 2021. Archived from the original on 23 January 2021. Retrieved 22 January 2021.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Baghdad bombing sparks global condemnation". Anadolu Agency. Archived from the original on 21 January 2021.
  15. ^ étrangères, Ministère de l'Europe et des Affaires. "Iraq - Attack in Baghdad (21 Jan. 2021)". France Diplomacy - Ministry for Europe and Foreign Affairs. Archived from the original on 21 January 2021. Retrieved 22 January 2021.
  16. ^ Bernama (22 January 2021). "Malaysia strongly condemns terrorist attacks in Baghdad". Astro Awani. Retrieved 24 January 2021.
  17. ^ "Turkey condemns deadly terror attack in Iraqi capital". Anadolu Agency. 21 January 2021. Archived from the original on 21 January 2021. Retrieved 21 January 2021.